Platt Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Platt Family Coat of Arms

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Platt Coat of Arms Meaning

Platt Name Origin & History

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Platt Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Platt blazon are the escallop, leopard’s face, fleur-de-lis and bezant. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and or .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Platt Name

PLATT

The name Platt is an Anglo-Saxon surname which is believed to have originated from one of two sources, both topographical. The first, it is believed the name may be derived from medieval English, possibly a deviation of the word plaett or plat which translates to “inn” possibly referring to an inn keeper or someone who lived near an inn. The second source, suggest the surname Platt or any variation of its spelling, may be of French-Norse origin coming from the word plat meaning a “level” or “flat”.

Surnames in Britain prior to the Norman conquest were largely unheard of. In the small settlements and villages which existed during earlier times, residents found little need for surnames as everyone in these communities new each other and a given name would usually suffice. However, with the passage of time, population growth and expansions of communities as villages gave way to towns and cities, it became necessary to add a qualifier to a people’s names to distinguish them, one from another. Therefore one person may have been identified by their given name plus their occupation while another may have been identified by their given name and one of their parent’s names. The introduction of surnames by the Norman aristocracy after the invasion seemed to be the next logical step in this evolution. There was a boundless supply from which surnames could be formed, in addition to the use of patriarchal/matriarchal names or reference to the individuals occupation, there were things such as defining physical traits, a familiar geographical location or a topographical landmark found near the individuals home or birthplace, the name of the village in which the person lived, and so much more. Soon, surnames would come not just to represent an individual but whole families.

There often exists variations in spelling of many surnames, as with many given names which date back to the early centuries. The variation in spelling of both given and surnames during this time period can be attributed to a lack of continuity regarding guidelines for spelling which was compounded by the diversity of languages in use in European countries at this time. The variations in the spelling of the surname Platt include but not limited to; Platt, Plat, Platte, Plait, Plate, and Blatt among others.

The earliest record of any variation of this surname is that of John de la Platt which appears in the Worcester tax rolls from 1242 These rolls, were a series of census and tax records kept by the English Treasury by order of King Henry III, with the oldest dating back to the 12th century. They hold the distinction of being the oldest consecutive set of records detailing English governance in the United Kingdom. These records span a period of over 700 years and have proven invaluable to researches over the years. Additional tax rolls show records of Geoffrey de Platte from Lancashire in 1285, Johannes de Plattes from Yorkshire in 1397, and Robert Plattes from York in 1590.

The first recorded immigrant to America bearing the surname or any variation of the spelling was Gilbert Platt and his son Lawrence who arrived in 1635 and settled in Virginia. Peter Platt landed and settled in Virginia in 1702 and Samuel Platt arrived and settled in Virginia in 1703.

There were also many immigrants to the British Common Wealth countries of Canada and New Zealand bearing the surname Platt. Isabella Platt landed in 1834 and settled in Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada as did Alex Platt who landed in 1862 and settled in Victoria, British Columbia. Edmund and Elizabeth Platt and their children Walter and Alice landed in 1876 and settled in Wellington, New Zealand. George Platt landed in 1880 and settled Auckland, New Zealand.

Worldwide, the highest concentration of people with the surname Platt are found in the United Kingdom, Australia, the United States, New Zealand, and Canada. By state, the largest percentile of those with the surname Platt live in Florida, Utah, and South Carolina.

There are many persons of note who bear the surname Platt. One such notable person is General Sir William Platt who was born in Cheshire, England. He was a highly decorated and revered officer in the British Army. Platt attended Sandhurst Royal Military College, graduating in 1905, at which time he was commissioned to the army and was station in India on the North-West Frontier. For his meritorious service he won the Distinguished Service Order. During World War I, Platt fought in France and Belgium and was promoted to brigade-major. In 1939, Platt was appointed a Companion of the Order of the Bath and by the time England entered World War II, Platt had been promoted to major general. He spent the majority of World War II in North Africa. Platt retired from the army once the war was over.

Platt Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Plastow, co. Essex; granted 6 Feb. 21 Elizabeth). Ar. on a bend betw. three escallops az. a bezant. Crest—A shoveller, wings expanded ppr.
2) (Wigan, co. Lancaster). Az. on a chev. betw. three escallops ar. as many leopards’ faces gu.
Same Arms. Crest—A bird volant az. wings ar. and sa. holding in the beak an escallop of the first.
3) (London and Kentish Town, co. Middlesex; granted by Camden, Clarenceux, to Richard Platt, of London, brewer). Or, fretty sa. on each joint a plate. Crest—A demi lion ramp. ppr. holding in the paws a plate.
4) Same Arms. Crest—A garb or, banded vert.
5) Vert three quatrefoils ar. each charged with a lion's head erased sa.
6) (Deanwater, co. Chester; granted to Robert Platt, Esq., of that place, son and heir of George Platt, of Stalybridge, Stockport). Motto—Labitur et labetur. Per fess dancettée ar. and gu. a pile and three frets, one and two, counterchanged. Crest—A demi wolf gu. semée of plates, armed and langued az. holding in the dexter paw a wreath ar. and gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489