Player Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Player Family Coat of Arms

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Player Coat of Arms Meaning

Player Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Player. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.
player coat of arms

Player Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Player blazon are the pale and arm in armour. The three main tinctures (colors) are guttee de sang, azure and ermine .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The Pale is one of the major, so called ordinaries, significant objects that extend across the entire field of the shield. The pale being a broad vertical band up the centre of the shield 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale. In origin, the word probably has its roots in the same place as palisade, a defensive wall made of closely space upright timbers. Indeed, it is possible that the original “pales” arose where a wooden shield was constructed of vertical planks painted in different hues 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1. This is perhaps why Wade, a writer on Heraldic Symbology suggested that denotes “military strength and fortitude” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47.

The Arm appears frequently in the crest of a coat of arms, often armoured and described in some detail as to its appearance and attitude. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:arm It can also appear on the shield itself as a charge. The arm itself is said to signify a “laboorious and industrious person” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P92, whilst the arm in armour may denote “one fitted for performance of high enterprise” 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P184

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Player Name

Player Origin:

England, Ireland

Origins of Player:

According to the early recordings of the spellings of this surname, this name is listed in many spelling forms such as Plaw, Play, Plea, Pley, Ple, Ply and in the inherited form as Player and Pleyer. This unusual surname is of 7th century Olde English origins, and has two distinct origins. The first origin of the name is that it is a professional surname for an artist or a singer, acquiring from the Olde English pre 7th Century “pleg,” which means to play or perform. A second possible description is that it is a nick name for a prominent opponent who participated in competitions of sports or athletics on the ‘plai-stow.’ Professional surnames ultimately showed the real profession of the name holder, and then became genetics. However, nicknames provided in the first example related to the profession, or to a difference of qualities, like physical characteristics or particularity, or also considered similar to an animal’s or bird’s characteristics or individuality. Previous examples of the surname derived from remaining parish records in the district of Greater London consist of John Play at St Botolphs Bishopgate in May 1549, Margarett Ply who married Robert Barwell at St Giles Cripplegate in November 1587, and George Plaw at St James Dukes Place, Westminster, in July 1695. Two remarkable name holders recorded in the “Documentations of National Biography,” were Thomas Player (1608 – 1672), and Thomas Player (junior) who passed away in 1686. Both fought, and both were selected Chamberlain of the City of London.

Variations:

More common variations are: Palayer, Plyer, Playr, Plaer, Payler, Ployer, Pleyer, Blayer, Pilyer, Pulyer.

England:

The origins of the surname Player were found in Middlesex where people held a family seat from early times and their first recording is shown on the previous poll rolls derived by the old lords of Britain to develop the rate of taxation of their activities.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John le Pleyer, dated about 1296, in the pipe rolls of the division of Hertfordshire. It was during the time of King Edward I, dated 1272- 1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varietions of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with the name Player had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Player settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Player who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Elizabeth Player landed in Virginia in 1652. John Player and Richard Player, both arrived in Virginia in the same year in 1653. Thomas Player came to Maryland in 1654, and Robert Player settled in Nevis in 1663.

The following century saw more Player surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Player who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Jan F Player arrived in San Francisco in the year 1851.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Player who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Edward Player, Margaret Player, David Player and Sarah Player, all arrived in Wellington, New-Zealand aboard the same ship “ Alfred The Great” in the same year in 1859.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Player: United States 4,125; England 1,640; Australia 665; Canada 412; South Africa 603; Scotland 98; Wales 102; Germany 269; Brazil 159; Pakistan 1,509.

Notable People:

Gary Player DMS, OIG is a South African professional golf player, well-known as one of the most successful players in the golfing world.

Scott Darwin Player was born in December 1969. He is an old NFL, CFL, and UFL punter. He was selected by the Birmingham Barracudas as a free agent in the year 1995. He also played college football at Florida State.

Tchissakid Dre Player (born February 4, 1992) is a Canadian football player who is a current free agent. He player for the BC Lions in the second round of the 2014 CFL Draft.

Player Family Gift Ideas

Browse Player family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Hackney, co. Middlesex). Motto—Servitute clarior. Az. a pale or, guttée de sang. Crest—An arm in armour fessways holding a broken lance all ppr.
2) Az. a pale erm. Crest—An armed arm in bend couped below the elbow, the hand supporting a broken spear erect all ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:arm
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P92
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P184