Pomeroy Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Pomeroy Family Coat of Arms

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Pomeroy Coat of Arms Meaning

Pomeroy Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Pomery.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Pomeroy. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Pomeroy Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Pomeroy blazon are the lion rampant, annulet and border invecked. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and gules.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

The border, (sometimes bordure) is a band running around the edge of the shield, following the edge contours and being differently coloured, possibly holding a series of small charges placed on top of it 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bordure. To distinguish it from similar arms, heraldic artists developed a series of decorative edges (obviously these are applied only to the inner edge). Invected is a very pleasing decorative pattern, the exact opposite of the decoration known as engrailed. It consists of a series of small arcs joined side by side, with points inwards, (i.e. a series of outward “bulges”). Wade suggests that these closely related decorative edges can be taken to signify “earth or land” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Pomeroy Name

This interesting and unusual surname acquires from two possible origins.  It may be of French locational origin from any of the following places in France, La Pommeraye, in Calvados and Seine-Inferieure, or Saint Sauveur La-Pommeraie in La Manche, which received their name from the old French “Pommeroie”, meaning apple orchard, from the Latin word “pomum”, apple.  More common variations are: Pomeroya, Pomerroy, Pomweroy, Pommeroy, Pomroy, Pomero, Pmeroy, Pomeray, Pommery.

The surname Pomeroy first found in Devon Where “the old family of Pomeray founded by the Norman continued to possess the Barony of Berry, until the attainder of Sir Thomas Pomeroy in the reign of Edward VI. ” The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ralph de Pomerai,  dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Devonshire and Somerset. It was during the reign of King William I, who was known as “William the Champion”, dated 1066-1087.  Surname all over the country became  a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Some of the people with the name Pomeroywho arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Eltweed Pomeroy, who settled with his wife in N antasket in 1630.  Eltweed Pomeroy, who landed in New England in 1633.  Medad Pomeroy, who arrived in North Hampton, NH in 1660.  Joseph Pomeroy, who arrived in New England in 1678.  james Pomeroy and Theophilus Pomeroy, who settled in Barbados in 1685. Some of the people with the surname Pomeroywho arrived in the Canada in the 19th century included Mr. Benjamin Pomeroy U.E. who settled in St. Andrews, Charlotte County, New Brunswick c. 1784.

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Browse Pomeroy family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Chalfont, St. Giles, co. Bucks). Ar. a lion ramp. sa. a bordure invecked gu. Crest—A fir-cone vert charged with a bezant.
2) (Berry-Pomeroy, co. Devon. Visit. Devon, 1620). Or, a lion ramp. and a bordure engr. gu. Crest—A lion sejant or, holding in the dexter forepaw an apple vert.
3) (cos. Devon and Worcester). Or, a lion ramp. gu. within a bordure engr. sa.
4) (Viscount Harberton). Motto—Virtutis fortuna comes. Or, a lion ramp. gu. holding betw. the paws an apple ppr. Crest—A lion ramp. gu. holding betw. the paws an apple ppr. Supporters—Two wolves, the dexter ppr., sinister ar., both plain collared and chained or.
5) Chequy gu. and ar. on a chev. sa. three annnlets or. Crest—A lion’s head erased gu. charged with four bezants and crowned with a ducal coronet ppr.
6) (granted to James Pomeroy, Esq., of Epping). Or, a lion ramp. gu. a bordure engr. sa. charged with eight crosses pattée ar. Crest—A fir cone erect ppr. charged with a fret or, betw. two fir-sprigs also ppr.
7) (granted 14 Oct. 1841, to James Pomeroy, and without the crest, to Emily Pomeroy Pomeroy, formerly Wakefield, the children of Robert Wakefield, of Clapton, in the parish of Hackney, Middlesex, gentleman, by Mary, his wife, dau. and co-heir of Thomas Pomeroy, Esq., late of Epping). Or, a lion ramp. gu. a bordure engr. sa. Crest—A lion sejant gu. holding in his dexter paw an apple or.
8) (St. Collumb, co. Cornwall, and co. Devon). Or, a lion ramp. a bordure engr. gu. a crescent for diff. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a lion’s head guard, gu.
9) (Tregny, co. Cornwall). Or, a lion ramp. gu. a bordure engr. sa. Crest—A lion sejant gu. holding In the dexter paw an apple or.

3 Comments

  • Gail Pomeroy says:

    How long does it take to ship or mail to NEw Brunswick Canada?

    • John Lehman says:

      Ms. Pomeroy,

      It shouldn’t take long. Unless things get hung up at customs, which I believe is unlikely with two friendly, first world nations such as the US and Canada, it should be about a week between the time you place the order and when you get it at your door. If you order by next week, I’d say you have a 99% chance of having it by Christmas Eve. Please contact me at info@coadb.com for more information.

      From Zazzle: “Please note that international deliveries can average 2-7 days with Express shipping or 4-21 days with Standard shipping. For the most accurate estimate, please feel free to place a mock order. During checkout, you will be presented the available shipping options, based on which Zazzle site you are using and the shipping destination.”

  • Gail Pomeroy says:

    How long does it take to ship or mail to NEw Brunswick Canada?
    Send info

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bordure
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40