Popham Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Popham Family Coat of Arms

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Popham Coat of Arms Meaning

Popham Name Origin & History

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Popham Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Popham blazon are the buck’s head, chief and fesse. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and argent.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The chief is an area across the top of the field 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40. It appears in many different forms and can itself be charged with other charges and ordinaries, 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief, being treated almost as if it were a completely separate area. In its simplest form it can be clearly identified. Early examples include the award by Henry III of England to the knight Robert de MORTEYN BRETON of Ermine, a chief gules.

The chief is an area across the top of the field 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40. It appears in many different forms and can itself be charged with other charges and ordinaries, 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief, being treated almost as if it were a completely separate area. In its simplest form it can be clearly identified. Early examples include the award by Henry III of England to the knight Robert de MORTEYN BRETON of Ermine, a chief gules.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Popham Name

Popham Origin:

England

Origins of Popham:

It is an English geographical surname. It acquired from the small Hampshire hamlet named as Popham near the town of Basinstoke. It was first listed over one thousand years ago in the spelling of Popham and is the only example that we know of a place name from before the Norman invasion of 1066, which has proceeded down over the many centuries, while handling its real spelling. This record was then crushed by the reality that nobody knows what it really means. There is a suggestion that it may acquire from the old word “popol” which means a rock, and so, the whole meanings of the name is a house (ham) made of stones. Geographical Surnames are frequently “from” names. That is to say, names given as easy recognition to people after they departed from their original hamlet or town, to move any other place, even though this could be the next hamlet. Spelling over the centuries being at best erratic and local pronunciation very thick, often lead to the creation of variants. Again, this does not seem to have occurred with Popham, making it uncommon. Almost every English surname has added at least an “e” at the similar point in history.

Variations:

More common variations are: name, came, Papham, Pophem, Pofham, Poyphom, Paupham, Puapham, Bpham.

England:

The surname Popham first appeared in Hampshire at Popham, a hamlet south of Basingstoke. It was considered that “an ancestor, Gilbert de Popham, resided in the period or King John and there the elder line continued till Henry VI.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Popham had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Popham settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Popham who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Edward Popham, nephew of George Popham settled in Maine in 1607. George Popham (1550-1608) English settler from Plymouth to New England aboard the Gift of God from Somerset in 1607 who founded the short-lived Popham Colony and Fort Popham, located near the present-day town of Phippsburg, Maine. Richard Popham, who arrived in Maryland in 1661.

The following century saw more Popham surnames come. Some of the people with the surname Popham who settled in the United States in the 19th century included William Popham at the age of 27, arrived in West Indies in 1812. Thomas F Popham at the age of 51, landed in New York in 1815. Richard Popham settled in New York in 1820. James Popham at the age of 60, landed in New York, NY in 1850.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Popham who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Eliza Popham arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Oriental.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Popham: United States 2,250; England 860; Wales 192; New Zealand 173; Canada 149; South Africa 110; Australia 98; Scotland 46; Thailand 6; Japan 2.

Notable People:

Alexander Popham (1605–1669), was an English representative of Parliament.

Alix Popham (born 1979), is a Welsh rugby union player.

Arthur E. Popham (1889–1970), was a British art professor.

Edward Popham (1610–1651), was a General-at-Sea during the English Civil War on the Parliamentarian side.

George Popham (1550–1608), was an administrating colonist in Maine born in Somerset, England.

Home Riggs Popham (1762–1820), was a British naval officer and inventor of a numeric code for signal flags.

John Popham (military commander) (died the 1460s), under Henry V, speaker of the House of Commons under Henry VI.

John Popham (Lord Chief Justice) (1531–1607), was an announcer of the House of Commons and senior Chief Justice of England.

Lana Popham (born 1968), is a Canadian leader in the 39th Parliament of British Columbia.

Stephen Popham (1745–1795), was a representative of Parliament of Ireland for Castlebar, made improvements to Chennai, India.

Thurstan de Popham was an officer of Hampshire in 1150.

Robert Brooke-Popham (1878–1953), was a British air chief manager.

Popham Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Popham, co. Hants, temp. King John; the last male heir of the chief line, Sir Stephen Popham, Knt., of Popham, left four daus. his co-heirs, viz., Margery, m. Thomas Hampden, Esq.; Eleanor, m. John Barentine Esq.; Elizabeth, m. John Wadham, Esq. ; and Alice, to Humphrey Foster, Esq.). (Huntworth, co. Somerset; descended from Sir Hugh Popham, Knt., of Huntworth, second son of Robert Popham, Esq., of Popham, m. Joan, dau. and heiress of Sir Stephen de Kentisbury, Knt.). (Bagborough, co. Somerset; originally, from the time of Edward III., of Huntworth). (Shanklin, Isle of Wight; descended from George Popham, Esq., of Barwick Bassett, younger son of Alexander Popham, Esq., of Littlecott, M.P. co. Somerset, and one of the Protector’s Upper House; Mary. dau. and heir of John Popham, Esq., of Shanklin and Kitehill, m. the Rev. Richard Walton White, and their son, Francis White, Esq., assumed by royal licence 1853, the additional surname of Popham). (Lynton, co. Devon. Visit. Devon, 1620). Ar. on a chief gu. two bucks heads cabossed or. Crest—A buck's head erased ppr.
2) (Littlecott, co. Wilts; descended from Sir John Popham, Lord Chief Justice of England temp. Queen Elizabeth, second son of Alexander Popham, Esq., of Huntworth; the last male representative of Popham, of Littlecott, Francis Popham, Esq., of Littlecott, d. s. p. 1780,. having devised his estates to (the son of his sister Anne, m. to William Leyborne Leyborne, Esq.) his nephew, Edward William Leyborne, who took the name and arma. of Popham, and became General Leyborne Popham, of Littlecott). Motto—Mens pristina mansit. Same Arms and Crest, quartering Leyborne, Az. six lions ramp. ar.
3) Ar. a fesse gu. two bucks' heads in chief of the last.
4) Ar. on a fess gu. two bucks’ heads or.
5) Gu. a fess betw. two bucks’ heads ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse