Pratt Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Pratt Family Coat of Arms

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Pratt Coat of Arms Meaning

Pratt Name Origin & History

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Pratt Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Pratt blazon are the elephant, mullet, bezant and martlet. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, azure and sable .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The Elephant is not common on shields, although it occurs sometimes as a supporter of the shield and its trunk or proboscide is very frequently to be found in crests. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Elephant In meaning, it tends to adopt its more common usage and is said to represent someone who is both “sagacious and courageous”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P64

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Pratt Name

Pratt Origin:

Belgium, England, Ireland

Origins of Name:

The surname of Pratt has Anglo-Saxon origins, and is derived from the Old English Pre 7th Century word “praett” which can be translated to mean “a trick.” This surname most likely derived from a nickname for someone who performed tricks, such as a magician or a conjuror. This surname was most likely derived from either the occupation of a person or group, or was created based on the characteristics, such as physical attributes or peculiarities, mental and moral characteristics, habits, or the way that someone dressed. Occupational surnames were given to the original bearer because the name denoted their actual occupation. These surnames became hereditary after the original bearer, but often denoted that the son had followed in his father’s footsteps and taken up the same occupation.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Pratty, Peratt, Pratti, Pratte, Pratto, Pratta, Paratt, Poratt, Piratt, Pruatt

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Pratt was in the country of England, in the year of 1179. One person, by the name of Wilfric Prat was mentioned in the document called the “Seals Register” of the county of Suffolk. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of King Henry II of England, who ruled from the year 1154 to the year 1189. Other mentions of the surname of Pratt can be found throughout history in the country of England. Aedmund Pret was mentioned in the Pipe Rolls of Berkshire in the year 1192, and one Dereman le Prat was recorded in Kent in the year 1198. In church records, one Abell Pratt, who was the son of Arthur Pratt, was christened at the church of St. Bartholomew Exchange in the city of London in the year of 1567. Those who carry the surname of Pratt in the country of England can be found in high volume in the county of Norfollk.

United States:

During the 1600’s settlers in Europe began to feel disgruntled with their homeland. These settlers began to look for new lives, and new freedoms that were not afforded to them in the country of their birth. Many of these people were migrating to the United States of America because this land promised freedom from religious persecution, the promise of new land, and the promise of little to no taxation. This migration of people was referred to as the European Migration, and brought many new people to the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as The New World or The Colonies. The first person who bore the surname of Pratt in the United States of America was one Phineas Pratt, who arrived in Plymouth, Massachusetts, in the year 1622. Thomas Pratt set sail for the New World in the year 1635, when he was only seventeen years of age. Thomas Pratt settled in the state of Virginia in the same year.Those who bear the surname of Pratt in the United States of America can be found in the states of Massachusetts, New York, California, New Jersey, Ohio, Michigan, Missouri, Iowa and the state of Washington in higher concentrations than the rest of the United States.

Pratt Today:

United States 69,880

Sierra Leone 21,063

England 12,750

Australia 6,935

Canada 6,026

Nigeria 3,821

South Africa 3,543

Ghana 3,275

Liberia 3,213

The Bahamas 1,758

Notable People:

Betty Rosenquest Pratt (1925-2016) who was an amateur tennis player from America who was the co-winner of the 1956 U.S. National Championships

Daria Pratt (1860-1938) who was an Olympian from America who won the bronze medal for golf at the 1900 Summer Olympic Games

Brigadier-General Don Forrester Pratt (1892-1944) who was an Assistant Comrade of the General 101st Airborne Division of North-West Europe from America, and served from the year 1942 to the year 1944

Major-General Henry Conger Pratt (1882-1966) who was a Commanding General of the Western Defense Command who was from America, and served from the year 1944 to the year 1945

Spencer William Pratt (born in 1983) who is a television personality from America

Kyla Alissa Pratt (born in 1986) who is an actress and singer from America, best known for her work on Barney & Friends, Let’s Stay Together, The Proud Family and many more

Murray Fletcher Pratt (1897-1956) who was a science fiction writer from America, as well as an author of fantasy and history

Theodore Pratt (1901-1969) who was a writer from America

Bela Lyon Pratt (1867-1917) who was a sculptor from America

Pratt Family Gift Ideas

Browse Pratt family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Marquess of Camden). Motto—Judicium parium aut lex terrae. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, sa. on a fess betw. three elephants’ heads erased ar. as many mullets of the first, for Pratt; 2nd and 3rd, sa. a chev. betw. three spears’ heads ar. the points embrued, for Jeffreys. Crests—1st, Pratt: An elephant’s head erased ar.; 2nd: A dragon's head erased vert, holding in the mouth a sinister hand couped at the wrist gu. and about the neck a chain, and pendent therefrom a portcullis or. Supporters—Dexter, a griffin sa. beak and claws gu.; sinister, a lion ramp. or, each gorged with a collar ar. charged with three mullets sa.
2) (Ryston Hall, co. Norfolk; descended from Edmund Pratt, Esq., Lord of the Manor of Carles in Hockwold, temp. Henry VIII.). Motto—Rident florentia prata. Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. two pellets, each charged with a martlet of the first in chief, and another pellet in base, charged with a trefoil slipped ar. three mascles or, quartering Gylour, viz., Sa. on a chev. ar. betw. three pewits' heads erased erm. beaked gu. as many annulets of the field. Crest—Betw. a branch of oak and another of pine ppr. each fructed or, a wolf's head per pale ar. and sa gorged with a collar, charged with three roundles, all counterchanged, langued and erased gu.
3) (Hathern, co. Leicester, and Southwark, co. Surrey; granted 23 August, 1601). Az. three bezants, each charged with a martlet of the first, a chief or. Crest—A demi unicorn salient or, holding in the paws a mascle az.
4) (co. Leicster). Sa. a chev. or, in base three bezants, each charged with a martlet az. Crest—A demi unicom or, holding a lozenge az.
5) (co. Norfolk). Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three pellets, each charged with a martlet of the field, as many mascles or. Crest—A wolf's head par pale ar. and sa. Another Crest—A lion's head couped sa. pierced in bend sinister by a broken spear or.
6) (London). Ar. on a fess az. three mascles or, betw. as many pellets, on each an annulet of the first.
7) (co. Suffolk). Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three pellets each charged with an escallop or, as many mascles of the third. Crest—A lizard vert, ducally gorged and lined or.
8) Ar. on a chev. sa. betw. three pellets as many mascles or. Crest—A wolf's head erased quarterly ar. and sa.
9) (co. Meath; Joseph Pratt, Esq., temp. Charles II.; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1680, his wife Lydia, dau. of Abraham Clement, of Killenacrate, co. Cavan). Ar. on a chev. betw. three pellets, each charged with a martlet of the field, as many mascles of the last. Crest—A falcon ppr. belled and jessed or.
10) (Youghal and Castlemartyr, co. Cork; granted by Betham, Ulster, to Lieut-General John Pratt, Rev. James Pratt, Rector of Kilnglory, co. Cork, Colonel Charles Pratt, and the descendants of their grandfather, James Pratt, Esq., of Youghal). Gu. on a fess or, three mullets sa. betw. as many elephants’ heads erased of the second, tusked ar. Crest—An elephant’s head erased sa. tusked or.
11) (Cabra Castle, co. Cavan; confirmed by Betham, Ulster, to Rev. Joseph Pratt, of that place). Motto—Virtute et armis. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a chev.sa. betw. three pellets, each charged with a martlet of the first, as many mascles of the field, for Pratt; 2nd and 3rd, or, an adder curling and erected on its tail sa., for Coach. Crest—A lion's head erased gu. pierced through the back of the neck with a broken spear ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Elephant
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P64
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122