Proctor Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Proctor Family Coat of Arms

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Proctor Coat of Arms Meaning

Proctor Name Origin & History

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Proctor Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Proctor blazon are the nail, martlet and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and sable .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

It is important that a coat of arms be easily recognised and so everyday objects were frequently used as clearly identifiable charges – tools 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69 being a common and important example of these, of which the nail is typical. Some of these tools are rather obscure to modern eyes, who of us nowadays would recognise a hemp-break 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P163, let alone know what to use it for! Nevertheless, for mediaeval peasant it was a clearly identifiable symbol.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.15The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Proctor Name

Proctor Origin:

England, France

Origins of Proctor:

The surname of Proctor is considered an occupational surname. In the case of the surname of Proctor, those who were given this surname originally worked as a steward. This means that the original bearer of the surname of Proctor most likely served as a steward, meaning that he actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son. In the case of the surname of Proctor, the surname itself derived from the Middle English word of “proktour, which was also spelled as “proketour,” and which itself comes from the Old French word of “procurateor,” stemming from the Latin word of “procurare,” all of which can be translated to mean “to manage.” It is believed that the occupational surname of Proctor was given to those who served as an attorney in a spiritual court, those who served as tax collectors, and those who collected alms on behalf of lepers and monks.

Variations:

More common variations are: Procktor, Procter, Prockter, Procktor, Procotor, Proctoer, Poroctor, Procteor

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Proctor can be traced to the country of England. One person, who was recorded to have the surname of Proctor, was named as one Thomas le Procurator, who was mentioned in the document known as the Hundred Rolls of Lincolnshire in the year of 1273. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward I, who was known throughout the ages, and commonly referred to throughout history as both “Longshanks,” and “The Hammer of the Scots.” King Edward I of England was such named because of the wars, conquests, and overall hardships that he waged on the country of Scotland throughout his reign, which lasted from the year of 1272 to the year of 1307. Other mentions of the surname of Proctor in the country of England include on William le Procuratur, who was mentioned as residing in the county of Lincolnshire in the year of 1292, one Johanna le Proketour, who was named within the document known as the Subsidy Rolls of the County of Yorkshire in the year of 1301, and one John Proketour, who was found in the Book of Fees of Durham Priory in the year of 1356. Those who bear the surname of Proctor within the country of England can be found in the areas in and around the city of London.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th Century, it became common for European citizens to migrate to the United States of America. Among those disgruntled people, who were just in search of a better life for them and their families, was one Allis Proctor, who arrived in the state of Virginia in the year of 1621, who carried the surname of Proctor to the United States of America. One George Proctor arrived in the state of Massachusetts, in the city of Dorchester in the year of 1637, and was followed by one Nathaniel Proctor, who landed in Maryland in 1659.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Proctor: United States 40,653; England 10,072; Canada 3,004; Australia 2,618; South Africa 2,137; Scotland 1,162; New Zealand 615; Wales 587; Northern Ireland 370; Ireland 306

Notable People:

James Edward Proctor Jr. (1936-2015) who was a politician from America who served as a member of the Maryland House of Delegates from the year 1990 to the year 2015

Haydn Proctor (1903-1996) who was a judge and politician from America who served as the president of the New Jersey State Senate during the year 1946

Thomas Proctor (1739-1806) who was a commander of the 4th Continental Artillery Regiments from as an American who was born in Ireland he served during the revolutionary war

Redfield Proctor Jr. (1879-1957) who was a politician from America who served as Vermont’s 59th Governor from the year 1923 to the year 1925

Phillip Proctor who was born in the year 1940 and who is an actor and voice actor who belongs to The Fireside Theatre and is most well-known for his voice acting roles in various Pixar films that include Toy Story 1, Toy Story 2, Monsters Inc., A Bug’s Life, and Finding Nemo

Scott Christopher Proctor who was born in the year 1977 and who is an American who is retired from the MLB

Proctor Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Wisbeach, co. Cambridge, and co. Middlesex). Or, three nails sa. Crest—A martlet gu.
(co. Middlesex, granted 1761; and London). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three martlets gu. Crest—On a mount vert a greyhound sejant ar. spotted brown, collared or.
(Thorpe-upon-the-Hill, and Springfield House, co. York). Ar. a chev. betw. ten crosses crosslet, six in chief and four in base gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P163
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
15. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45