Pryer Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Pryer Family Coat of Arms

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Pryer Coat of Arms Meaning

Pryer Name Origin & History

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Pryer Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Pryer blazon are the escallop and bar wavy. The two main tinctures (colors) are vert and gules.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). It is also possible to place decorative edges along bars, typically these are smaller than those found on the major ordinaries like the fess and pale, but have the same design and share the same meanings. The decorative edge pattern Wavy, is a typical example of this. For obvious reasons it is associated with both water and the sea 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40. Indeed, a roundel with alternating bars of azure and argent (blue and white) is known by the shorthand term fountain, representing water at the bottom of a well 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water. Other colours have also been used and the result can be very pleasing to the eye.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Pryer Name

Pryer Origin:

England

Origins of Pryer:

This unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and acquires from the Olde English pre 7th Century “prior” which means former, and would have started as a professional name for a servant. After that, the name became a nickname for a person showing the qualities related to priest. The formulation of surnames from nicknames was a common practice in the Middle Ages, and many modern-day surnames acquire from old nicknames relating to particular features, as in this example “the official one.” The surname was first noted in the early 13th Century, and other early registrations contain Roger le Priur, recorded in the Feet of Fines of Cambridgeshire (1237), and Nicholas le Prior, an observer in the Assize Court Rolls of Somerset (1268). In the new era, the surname has many various spellings such as Prier, Prior, Pryer and Pryor. In January 1541, Ellen Pryor married John Ashbey at the Parish of St. Lawrence Jewry and St. Mary Magdalene, Milk Street, London. A Royal symbol given to the family represents three red chevronels on an ermine curve, between four gold stars of eight points wavy, the peak being a star (as in the arms). The Saying, “Malo mori quam feodari,” converts as, “I would rather die than be dishonored.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Puryer, Peryer, Paryer, Proyer, Prayer, Preyer, Pryear, Pryuer, Poryer

England:

The surname Pryer first appeared in Derbyshire where they held a family seat from very early times and were given lands by Duke William of Normandy, their true King, for their outstanding support at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Roger Priur, dated about 1205, in the “Curia Regis Rolls of Suffolk.” It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199 – 1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Pryer had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Pryer landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Pryer who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Daniell Pryer, who came to New England in 1635 at the age of 13. Daniell Pryer at the age of 13, arrived in New England in 1635. Peter Pryer at the age of 26, landed in Virginia in 1635. John Pryer, who landed in Virginia in 1656. Thomas Pryer, who arrived in Virginia in 1663.

People with the surname Pryer who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Thomas Pryer, who came to Virginia in 1764.

The following century saw more Pryer surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Pryer who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Joseph Pryer, who arrived in New York in 1836.

Canada:

Individuals with the surname Pryer who landed in Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Edward Pryer U.E. who settled in Parr Town, Saint John, New Brunswick near the year 1784.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Pryer who landed in Australia in the 19th century included F. Pryer arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Mary Ridgway” in 1839.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Pryer: United States 819; England 774; Australia 215; Canada 80; Scotland 33; New Zealand 12; Wales 2; South Africa 2; Spain 1; Austria 1.

Notable People:

Kathryn Pryer was born in July 1990. She is an Australian football (soccer) player. She played for the Central Coast Mariners in the Australian W-League during the 2008–09 season. Kathryn made her debut against Perth Glory on Saturday, November 2008 after being replaced for team-mate Trudy Camilleri.

Pryer Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (France). Or, on two bars gu. eight escallops ar. a bordure vert.
2) (High Elms, Baldock,co. Herts). Ar. three bars wavy sa. on a chief gu. a saltire or. Crest—A demi lion ramp.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water