Rigdon Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Rigdon Family Coat of Arms

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Rigdon Coat of Arms Meaning

Rigdon Name Origin & History

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Rigdon Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Rigdon blazon are the pile, cross crosslet fitchee and cock’s head. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The pile was originally quite a simple shape, being a triangle reaching from the top of the shield down to a point near the lower centre 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile. A clear example being that of CHANDOS awarded in 1337, Or a pile gules. There is some argument as to the origin, Wade suggests some similarity with the meaning of “pile” in construction (a foundation) and hence that the shape could be adopted by those who have demonstrated some ability in the building trade 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48. An earlier writer, Guillim, perhaps more plausibly suggested that the shape echoes those of a pennant or triangular flag 8A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P52 The shape is quite distinctive however and became popular, leading to many embellishments to distinguish it from its close fellows, with multiple piles meeting at various points, starting from various edges and with additional decoration, leading to potentially quite complex descriptions!

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

The cock, and other members of its avian family are often found in coats of arms, although telling them apart simply from their images can sometimes be a challenge! Many times the precise choice of species arises as a play on words on the family name, sometimes now lost in history. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cock The cock itself, Wade points out is a “bird of great courage” and might be used as a symbol of “watchfullness”, being the herald of the dawn. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Rigdon Name

Rigdon Origin:

England

Origins of Rigdon:

The surname of Rigdon is a locational surname that comes from the country of England. Since the surname of Ridgon is said to be a locational surname, this means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Rigdon, the locations from which the original bearers of the surname would have hailed are spread throughout the country of England. The most prominent location from which the surname of Rigdon derives can be traced to the lost village of Rigden, which was said to be located in the county of Kent. The word itself can be traced to the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “ric” which can be translated to mean “a stream,” and the addition of the word of “denu” which can be translated to mean “a valley.” Another possible origin of the surname of Rigdon is that it is a topographical surname. A topographical surname is used to describe someone who lived on or near a residential landmark. This landmark could be either man made or natural, and would have been easily identifiable in the area from which it hailed, thus making the people who lived near it easily distinguished. In the case of the surname of Rigdon, those who lived on or near a valley with a stream running through it would have been given this surname.

Variations:

More common variations are: Ridodon, Riegdon, Rigadon, Rigaudon, Rigden, Regdon, Ragdon, Rogdon, Rigdan, Rigton, Rikdon, Rigdin, Regodon, Ragodon, Regudon

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Rigdon can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Richard Rikedoun was mentioned in the document known as the Assize Rolls of the county of Kent in the year of 1317. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward II, who was known throughout the ages and commonly referred to as one “Edward of Caernafon.” King Edward II of England ruled from the year of 1307 to the year of 1327. Other mentions of the surname of Rigdon in the country of England include one Amos Rigdon who was baptized in the year of 1563, and one Samuel Rigdon who was christened in the year of 1565. Both of these baptisms occurred in Kent, where a large majority of those who bear the surname of Rigdon are found.

United States of America:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Rigdon in the United States was one Charlotte Rigdon who arrived in America in 1903.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Rigdon: United States 5,748; Canada 9; Kazakhstan 2; Iraq 1; Kuwait 1; Mexico 1; India 1

Notable People:

Robley S. Rigdon, who served as a Brigadier General in the National Guard in Georgia, and who was from America.

Commander William M. Rigdon (1904-1991) who served as the Assistant Naval Aide in the United States White House from the year of 1942 to the year of 1953.

Kevin Rigdon (born in 1956) who was a two-time Tony Award winner, and a four-time Drama Desk Award winner, and was a scenic designer and lighting designer from America.

Paul David Rigdon (born in 1975) who was a former MLB, also known as Major League Baseball, pitcher who played from the year of 2000 to the year of 2001, and who was from America.

Sidney Rigdon (1793-1876) who was a leader during the early stages of the Latter Day Saint, also known as LDS, movement, and who was from America.

Jay Rigdon, who served as a Candidate for the U.S. Representative from the state of Indiana in the 3rd District in the year of 2002, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Charles L. Rigdon, who served as an Attorney in Wyoming in the year of 1914 to the year of 1921, and who was a politician from America.

Rigdon Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Dowsby, co. Lincoln). Or, on a pile engrailed azure three crosses crosslet fitchee of the first. Crest—A cock's head proper combed and wattled gules beaked or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48
8. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P52
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cock
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80