Rose Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Rose Family Coat of Arms

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Rose Coat of Arms Meaning

Rose Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Rosse.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Rose. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Rose Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Rose blazon are the rose, falcon, water bouget and boar. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, azure and gules .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The falcon is a bird long associated with hunting and we need look no further than a liking for this pursuit for its presence on many early coats of arms. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Falcon We also find many of the accessories used in falconry depicted on arms, and a surprising number of terms from the art of falconry have found use in modern English idioms and the interested reader is recommended to search out the origins of the phrases hoodwinked and “cadging” a lift.

A wide variety of inanimate objects 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281 appear in coats of arms, so of them still recognisable today, others now rather obscure. The images used are often simplified and stylised, the water bouget is a typical case of the later, such that the casual observer would be hard pressed to discern its function. It represents in fact a yoke with two skins attached to be worn over the shoulder and has been found in coats of arms almost from the beginning of the art. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water Bouget. Somewhat literally, Wade suggests that their appearance on arms may have been due to a holder who had “brought water to an army or beseiged place”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P114

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Rose Name

Rose Origin:

Scotland, England

Origins of Rose:

The surname of Rose is first found in the Scottish culture, and this surname is believed to have stemmed from the Ross Clan of Scotland. This surname of Rose is also believed to be a locational surname from the country of Normandy. Because the surname of Rose is said to be locational, this means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. This place “Rots” from which the surname of Rose is said to hail is near the area of Caen in Normandy, and is said to have derived from the Old Germanic word “rod” which can be translated to mean “clearing.” The surname of Rose can also be topographical for someone who lives in or near a clearing. Topographical surnames are used to describe people who live near a distinguishable landmark within an area, and can easily be identified as such. The final possible meaning of the surname of Rose is that it was used as a nickname for someone who was like the flower, roses. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress.

Variations:

More common variations are: Rowse, Roose, Rosse, Ros, Ross, Rous, Rush, Ress, Rouse, Rowse, Rosie

History:

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Rose was found within the country of Scotland. One person who was named as Muriel de Rots was mentioned in the document titled “A Genealogical Deducation of the Family of Rose of Kilravock” in the year of 1333. This document was written under the reign of one King David II, King of Scotland who ruled from the year 1329 to the year 1371. Those who are known by the surname of Rose within the country of Scotland can be found in the northern areas of Scotland. One area that is said to have a particularly high concentration of people who carry the surname of Rose within the country of Scotland is the area known as Inverness-shire.

England:

Within the country of England, there is a sizeable population of people who bear the surname of Rose. The areas with the largest population of people who are known by the surname of Rose can be found within the counties of Essex, Kent, and Sussex, as well as the areas in and around the city of London.

United States of America:

There are many people within the United States of America who bear the surname of Rose. The areas with a large concentration of people who bear this surname include California, New York, Pennsylvania, and Ohio.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Rose: United States 175,309; England 39,186; Brazil 20,971; Canada 17, 919; Australia 16, 169; Uganda 13,443; Nigeria 12,991; Algeria 12,406; France 12,393; India 10,724

Notable People:

Rusty Rose (1942-2016) who was and entrepreneur from America who was also the owner of the Texas Rangers from the year 1989 to the year 1997

Ralph Rose (1885-1913) who was an Olympic athlete from America who competed in the hammer toss, the shot put, and in discus and who earned three gold medals, two silver medals, and one bronze medal and the 1904 Summer Olympic Games

Charlies “Charlie” Grandison Rose III (1939-2012) who was a politician from America and who was also North Carolina representative to the United States Congress from the year 1973 to the year 1997

Irwin A. Rose, who is a biologist from America, who, along with two others, was awarded the 2004 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

Wesley Herman Rose, who was born in 1918 and who was the President of Fred Rose Music as well as the founder of the Country Music Association in the year 1958, and who was also named Country Music Man of the Year in the year 1963

Major General Maurice B Rose (1899-1945) who was a WW11 General from America who earned, among many other decorations, the Croix de Guerre

Rose Family Gift Ideas

Browse Rose family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (London; Nicholas Rose, temp. Henry VII. and Henry VIII., his dau. Martha, m. John Haydon, Alderman and Sheriff of London. Visit. London, 1568). Az. a falcon volant or, a double tressure flory counterflory of the last, on a canton ar. a rose gu.
2) (Cransley Hall, co. Northampton). Sa. a fess or, betw. three roses barbed and seeded ppr. Crest—Out of a mural crown a demi lion ramp.
3) (Wolston Heath, co. Northampton). Ar. on a chev. az. betw. three roses gu. a water bouget betw. two mullets of six points pierced of the field, quartering Holden, viz., Vert a fess erm. betw. two pheons point upwards in chief, and a buglehorn in base ar. Crest—A cubit arm erect vested sa. cuffed ar. holding in the hand a rose slipped and leaved ppr.
4) (The Ferns, co. Sussex). Motto—Non sine sente Rosa. Or, a chev. betw. three water bougets az., quartering Holden. Crest—A lion holding a rose in his paw.
5) (London; Alderman Sir William Anderson Rose, Lord Mayor of London, 1862-3, Col. Royal London Militia). Motto—Constant and true. Ar. a lion pass. guard. az. betw. three water bougets sa. a crescent for diff. Crest—A harp or, stringed ar.
6) (Abingdon, co. Berks, formerly of Great Yarmouth, co. Norfolk; the late Richard Rose, Esq., of Abingdon, who was killed at the seige of Attoor, in India, in 1768, left an only child, James Dowsett Rose, Esq.). Sa. on a pale ar. three roses gu. seeded and slipped ppr. Crest—A rose gu. seeded and slipped ppr. betw. two wings erm.
7) (Waddesden, co. Bucks). Az. a chev. erm. betw. three water bougets ar. Crest—A buck trippant ar.
8) (Harland, co. Derby). Sa. on a chev. ar. three roses gu. seeded and barbed ppr. in the dexter chief point a close helmet of the second.
9) (London). Az. a falcon volant within a double tressure flory counterflory or, on a canton ar. a rose gu.
10) (Easter Gate, co. Sussex; granted 16 Feb. 1681). Erm. an eagle displ. sa. beaked and membered gu. debruised with a bendlet componée or and az.
11) Sa. on a pale or, three roses gu. Crest—A rose gu. betw. a pair of wings ppr.
12) Gu. on a chev. or, betw. three horseshoes ar. as many roses of the first.
13) Sa. a chev. betw. three roses ar.
14) Gu. a chev. ar. betw. three rose leaves ar.
15) Ar. an eagle sa. depressed with a bend gobonated or and gu.
16) (Montreal, Canada, and Queen’s Gate, London, bart.). Mottoes— Above the crest, Audeo; and below the shield, Constant and true. Or, a boar’s head couped gu. armed and langued az. betw. three water bougets sa. on a chief of the second three maple leaves of the first. Crest—A harp or, stringed az.
17) (Rayners, co. Bucks, bart.). Motto—Probitate ac virtute. Az. a chev. invected erminois betw. three water bougets in chief and one in base ar. Crest—A stag ar. collared, and resting the dexter foreleg on a water bouget az.
18) (Reg. Ulster’s Office). Sa. on a chev. ar. three roses gu. barbed vert, seeded or. Crest—A peacock in his pride ppr. beaked or.
19) (Kilravock, co. Nairn). Motto—Constant and true. Or, a boar’s head couped gu. betw. three water bougets sa. Crest—A harp az.
20) (Markinch, Provost of Inverness, 1679). Motto—Quo spinosior fragrantior. The same, within a bordure indented gu. Crest—A dexter hand holding a slip of a rose bush ppr.
21) (Ballevit, co. Ross). Motto—Armat spina rosas. Or, a boar’s head couped gu. betw. three water bougets sa. a bordure az. charged with three garbs and as many boars’ heads couped alternately of the field. Crest—A rose gu. stalked and leaved ppr.
22) (lnsch, 1680). Motto—Magnes et adamas. Or, a boar's head couped gu. betw. three water bougets sa. a bordure of the second, charged with six mullets of the first. Crest—A rose gu. stalked and barbed vert.
23) (James Rose, Knight of the Swedish Military Order of the Sword, 1814). Motto—Pro patria. Az. three water bougets or, on a chief wavy ar. the badge of the Royal Swedish Military Order of the Sword pendent from a mural crown gu. betw. a sword erect ppr. and an anchor pale sa. Crest—Out of a mural crown or, an eagle’s head ppr. charged on the neck with a rose gu.
24) (Huntingdon, Canada, 1872). Mottoes—Over the crest, Audeo; below the arms, Constant and true. Or, a boar's head couped gu. betw. three water bougets sa. on a chief of the second three maple leaves of the first. Crest—A harp or, stringed az.
25) (Foxhall, co. Tipperary; confirmed by Betham, Ulster, to Wellington Anderson Rose, Esq., of Foxhall, son of Richard Anderson Rose, Esq., of Foxhall, grandson of Thomas Maunsell Rose, Esq., of Aghabeg and Rathkeal, great-grandson of Richard Rose, Esq., of Limerick, by Mary, his wife, dau. of John Anderson, Esq., of. Foxhall, great-great-grandson of George Rose, Esq., of Limerick, by Susanna, his second wife, dau. and co-heir of Richard Stephens, Esq., of Newcastle, co. Limerick, and Barnstaple, co. Devon, and to the descendants of their ancestor, Thomas Rose, of Morgans, co. Limerick). Motto—Non sine sente rosa. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, per pale ar. and or, a chev. gu. betw. three water bougets sa., for Rose; 2nd, per chev. ar. and gu. in chief two eaglets displ. az., for Stephens; 3rd, ar. a saltire betw. two mullets in chief and in base gu. and two boars’ heads erased in fess sa., for Anderson. Crests—1st: A demi lion ramp ar. holding in the dexter paw a rose gu. slipped vert.; 2nd: An eagle, wings elevated sa. preying on a lion’s gamb erased ppr.; 3rd: An oak tree ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Falcon
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water Bouget
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P114