Rosier Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Rosier Family Coat of Arms

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Rosier Coat of Arms Meaning

Rosier Name Origin & History

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Rosier Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Rosier blazon are the rose, chevron and pelican in piety. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.12The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The parrot is a fairly recent usage, but the ancient form of popinjay was more common 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Parrot. Commonly coloured vert (green) with beak and legs gules (red) it is usually depicted with a high degree of realism. 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P249

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Rosier Name

Rosier Origin:

France

Origin of Rosier:

According to early recordings of the spellings of the name, this name is listed as Rosier, Rossier, Rozea, Rozia, Rozzier, and many more. It is frequently connected to a 17th century Huguenot Protestant foreigner name in the British Islands. However, it is of French origins. It was listed initially in the county of Languedoc, Forez, and Auvergne. Perhaps, the name is a professional one and initially given to a producer or raiser of roses. Rose petals were mostly used in the early times for medical purposes, and also for fragrance in perfumes and clothes coloring. The Huguenots, started to arrive in Britain from about the year 1580, but it was not till the cancellation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685 that the flow developed into a flood. The damage to France in specific was excessive as many of the foreigners were the most experienced artists in Europe.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Rossier, Rousier, Roesier, Roisier, Roosier, Roissier, Roussier, Roessier, Rohssier, Rozier.

France:

The name Rosier first originated in Savoy in the Rhone-Alpes area of the French Alps, where this famed family held a family seat from ancient times.

Later examples of recordings consist of Bartholomew Rosier at the parish of St Martin Pomeroy in the city of London, in April 1638, James Roszier at St Dunstan’s Stepney, in August 1804, and after that Jean Rosier de Magnieu, dated 1680 in Forez, France.

It was during the time of King Louis X1V who was known to be “The Sun King,” 1643 – 1715.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Rosier settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Rosier who settled in the United States in the 17th century included James Rosier who settled in Maine in 1602. James Rosier who arrived in Maine in 1605. Morgan Rosier who settled in Virginia in 1618. Eliza Rosier who came to Virginia in 1650. Eliza Rosier, who came to Virginia in 1650.

Some of the people with the name Rosier who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Laurence Rosier, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1732. DeBeau Rosier, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1753. George Rosier, who came to New York in 1797.

Some of the people with the name Rosier who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Gabriel Rosier, at the age of 46, landed in Missouri in 1848. Carl Rosier, who settled in New York, NY in 1850. Michael Rosier, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851. Rosalie Rosier, at the age of 17, landed in New York in 1854.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Rosier: United States 4,212; England 1,059; Netherlands 1,387; South Africa 237; Australia 466; France 5,339; Haiti 5,744; Belgium 765; Brazil 238; Germany 336.

Notable People:

Cathy Rosier was a model and artist, who was born in Martinique, French West Indies, in January 1945 and died in Marrakech, Morocco, in May 2004 from a heart attack.

Frederick Rosier (1915–1998), was a Royal Air Force officer.

Jean-Louis Rosier (20th century), was a French racecar driver.

Joseph Rosier (1870–1951), was an American politician from West Virginia. He was born in Wilsonburg, West Virginia. He got his early education from public schools and graduated from Salem College in 1895. In 1890, Rosier was a master of the village school at Bristol, West Virginia and was head of the public schools of Salem in 1891 and 1892. In 1893 and 1894, he was the controller of schools in Harrison Division, West Virginia and was a representative of the ability of Salem College from 1894 to 1896.

Michèle Rosier (1930- ), is a film producer, scripter and fashion developer who made the V de V sportswear monogram. She has also worked as a movie director, producer and scripter since 1973.

Rosier Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Vicomte de Magnieu - Forez D'azur à trois chevrons d'or au chef du même chargé de trois roses de gueules Supports deux lions.
2) (co. Rutland). Argent on a chief indented sable (another, gules) three roses or. Crest—A pelican in her nest proper.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
12. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Parrot
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P249