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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Or, three bars azure on a quarter argent two lions passant gules.
2) Argent on a bend gules cotised sable three mullets pierced or.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Routh Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Routh Origin:

England

Origin of Routh:

According to early recorded spellings of this surname, this interesting and unusual name was listed in many spelling forms such as Roath, Roth, Rote, Rotte, Routh, Wreath, Wraith, Wrate, Wrates, Wroth and Wroath. It is a surname of English origins. It was acquired from the Olde English pre 7th Century word "wrath," which means offended or furious, it was a pet name for a person with a furious mind, or more possibly given to a strong, funny person of earlier times, the opposite, of a calm person. It is an example of an important set of early European surnames that were introduced from the continual use of pet names. The nicknames were introduced in the first example regarding a variation of qualities, like physical appearance or characteristics, mental and moral values, and sometimes considered attachments to an animal or bird in appearance or individuality. It has been concluded that ultimately the surname as Wraith frequently appeared in Northern England, though the spelling forms contained as Wroth and Wroath are originally from the south of the country. Documentation of the surname from early parish records consist of Anne Rote, named at St Michael Bassishaw, City of London, in July 1549, Ales Wrate married John Harte at Tottenham, in November 1559, Thomas Wrath, appears in the Friary Rolls of Yorkshire in 1587, and Mary Roath, married George Fowke, at St Benet's parish, Pauls Wharf, in the City of London, in January 1732. All over the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to interesting variants of the original spelling.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Routhy, Routhu, Raouth, Routhe, Routha, Roeuth, Routho, Routhi, Rouith, Rowuth.

England:

The surname Routh was first organized in Morayshire where they held a family seat from ancient times, and their first register arose on the early poll rolls introduced by ancient Lords of Britain to develop the rate of taxation of their services.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Routh who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Robert Routh, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1842. William F Routh, who arrived in Brazil in 1866.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Routh who settled in Canada in the 18th century included John Routh, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1774.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Routh: United States 4,278; England 661; India 43,143; Bangladesh 2,406; Brazil 270; Poland 191; Canada 171; Namibia 163; Australia 149; France 49.

Notable People:

Brandon Routh was born in the year 1979. He is an American performer, entertainer, and an old-fashion model. He was raised in Iowa before shifting to Los Angeles to seek acting work, and frequently performed on many television shows in the early 2000s.

Edward Routh was born in the year 1831 and died in 1907. He was a British expert in mathematics, famous as the remarkable coach of students qualifying for the Mathematical Tripos examination of the University of Cambridge in its prime day in the mid of the nineteenth century.

Jonathan Routh, born as John Reginald Surdeval Routh, (1927–2008) co-creator in the British style of the television show Candid Camera (1960–67) and also co-inventor with Germaine Greer and Kenny Everett in a later trial, Nice Time (1968). He released many comic books, and also designed for many years. He was also a British comedian.

Josh Routh is a modern American circus performer. He is a nationally American circus artist, and a representative of the comedian group Brothers Kaputnik, Death by Tickle and Circus Kaput. Josh studied at the festival Center in San Francisco, California and joined the Clown Conservatory where he did graduation in "Class Clown."

Martin Joseph Routh was born in September in the year 1755 and died in December in the year 1854. He was an English classical professor and administrator at Magdalen College, Oxford (1791–1854). He was born in South Elmham, Suffolk, England. He got his degree at Queen's College, Oxford, in May in the year 1770 and in July 1771, he was elected to a demyship at Magdalen College, Oxford. He got his degree with a BA in February in the year 1774 and was selected in July 1775 to a membership of Magdalen College.

Routh Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Routh blazon are the mullet, lion and bend. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 9. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 10. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 11.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 12 13 14. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 15 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 16, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 17. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 18. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 19.

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References

  • 1 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 4 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
  • 5 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 6 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 7 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 8 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
  • 9 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
  • 10 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
  • 11 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
  • 12 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
  • 13 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
  • 14 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
  • 15 A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
  • 16 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
  • 17 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
  • 18 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
  • 19 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49