Seabrook Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Seabrook Family Coat of Arms

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Seabrook Coat of Arms Meaning

Seabrook Name Origin & History

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Seabrook Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Seabrook blazon are the rose, cross crosslet fitchee and lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and argent .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 16Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 17Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 18A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Seabrook Name

Seabrook Origin:

England

Origins of Seabrook:

This interesting and unique surname is of English sources and is a geographical name from a region so named in Buckinghamshire, acquiring from the Old English pre 7th Century river name “Sorge” which means “Run out,” “moving slowly” and “broc” which means ” stream, water source.” The surname is sometimes dated back to the early 16th Century. Variations in the style of the spelling contain Seabrocke, Seabrook, Sebrook, etc.. Bernard Seabrocka married Christian Dandell at St. Andrew by the Wardrobe, London in June 1558. Margaret, daughter of William James Seabrooke, named at St. Margaret, Westminster in July 1599, and Mary Seabrook, married Robert Tyson at Allhallows London Wall in July 1663. One, Mary Seabrook at the age of 48, a famine traveler, moved from London aboard the “Northumberland” obligated for New York in August 1846.

Variations:

More common variations are: Seabrooke, Seabroook, Seabrrook, Sea Brook, Sebrook, Seabroke, Sawbrook, Seabrock, Saybrook, Ceabrook.

England:

The surname Seabrook first appeared in Essex where “William Sebright of Sebright, in Much Beddow, residing in the rule of Henry II is the offspring of this old family who removed into this division (Worcestershire) at a very old time.”

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ales Sebroke married Richard Wood, dated about 1539, in the “St. Mildred Poultry with St. Mary Colechurch”, London. It was during the time of King Henry VIII, who was known to be the “Good King Hal,” dated 1509-1547. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Seabrook had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Seabrook settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 19th, and 20th. Some of the individuals with the name Seabrook who landed in the United States in the 19th century included Sarah Seabrook at the age of 32 landed in America in 1821. A.J. Seabrook at the age of 24 settled in America from London, in 1893.

The following century saw more Seabrook surnames arrive. Some of the population with the name Seabrook who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Ava Gould Seabrook emigrated to America, in 1907. Dorothy Seabrook settled in America from London, England in 1907. Edna May Seabrook moved to the United States in 1907. Flora Mary Seabrook shifted to America from Chelmsford, England in 1909. Esther M. Seabrook moved to the United States in 1910.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Seabrook who landed in Canada in the 20th century included Fedelia Seabrook came to Vancouver B. c., Canada, in 1910. Francis H. Seabrook came to Vancouver BC, Canada, in 1910. Elisabeth Seabrook arrived in Toronto, Canada, in 1919.

Australia:

People with the surname Seabrook who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Henry William Seabrook arrived in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) sometime between 1825 and 1832. Joseph Seabrook arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Taymouth Castle.” Elizabeth Seabrook arrived in South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship “Aurora.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Seabrook: United States 3,111; England 2,275; Canada 1,323; Australia 808; South Africa 384; New Zealand 83; Hong Kong 83; Scotland 79; Belgium 30; Guernsey 30.

Notable People:

Brent Seabrook was a Canadian-born ice hockey player for the Chicago Blackhawks.

David Seabrook was a British author and scholar.

Keith Seabrook was a Canadian-born ice hockey player for the Abbotsford Heat and younger brother of Brent Seabrook.

Larry Seabrook was an American political leader and representative of New York City Council.

Whitemarsh Benjamin Seabrook was a pre-Civil-War Democratic administrator of South Carolina.

William Buehler Seabrook was an American adventurer, traveler, and scholar.

Wil Seabrook was an American indie rock musician.

Seabrook Family Gift Ideas

Browse Seabrook family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. a lion pass. gu. in chief a cross crosslet fitchee sa. Crest—A hand erect ppr. holding a cross crosslet fitchee in pale gu.
2) Ar. three roses sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
17. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
18. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60