Rowland Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Rowland Family Coat of Arms

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Rowland Coat of Arms Meaning

Rowland Name Origin & History

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Rowland Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Rowland blazon are the lion rampant, pale and pile wavy. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

The Pale is one of the major, so called ordinaries, significant objects that extend across the entire field of the shield. The pale being a broad vertical band up the centre of the shield 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale. In origin, the word probably has its roots in the same place as palisade, a defensive wall made of closely space upright timbers. Indeed, it is possible that the original “pales” arose where a wooden shield was constructed of vertical planks painted in different hues 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1. This is perhaps why Wade, a writer on Heraldic Symbology suggested that denotes “military strength and fortitude” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47.

The pile was originally quite a simple shape, being a triangle reaching from the top of the shield down to a point near the lower centre 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile. It can also be given a decorative egde style, and Wavy works well in this respect. It is, for obvious reasons, associated with both water and the sea 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40. Indeed, a roundel with alternating bars of azure and argent (blue and white) is known by the shorthand term fountain, representing water at the bottom of a well 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water. Other colours have also been used and the result can be very pleasing to the eye.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Rowland Name

Rowland Origin:

Scottish and English

Origins of Name:

The surname of Rowland is believed to be of an early medieval English origin, and may come from two sources. The first source is the Norman personal name, “Rolant” or “Rollant” which comes from the Germanic elements “hrod” which means renown, or to be renowned, and “land” which means land or territory. “Rolant” or “Rollant” was a popular personal name in the Middle Ages, due to the fame of one of Charlemagne’s warriors who had this name. Also in England, in Derbyshire and Sussex, the name is derived from an Old Norse phrase, “ra lundr.” “Ra” means roebuck, and “lundr” means wood or grove; thus this phrase literally translates to “wood of the Roebuck.” Thus, the surname of Rowland is deemed to be locational, meaning that the original people to have this surname moved from a roebuck grove to another area, often to seek out work, and they were best identified by the name of their birthplace. There are different variations of the surname Roland. The Irish spelling is O’Rothlian, the French and German spelling is Roland, while the English and Scottish spelling is Rowland.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Rowlands, Roland, Rolandson, Rowlland, Rrowland, Roweland, Rowaland, Rowlannd, Raowland, Rowlande, Rowind, Rolan, Rowlandson, Rolance, Rollance, Rollons

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname Rowland is believed to be that of Simon Rolland, who was a witness in the “Assize Court Rolls of Lincolnshire” in 1218, during the reign of King Henry II, who was also called “The Frenchman” and ruled from the year 1216 to the year 1272. According to the Derbyshire Church Registers, Humfridus Rowland and Johana Hadfield were married on August 25, 1604 at Baslow, an Anthony Rowland and Ann Pirson were married on January 7 1715 at Eyam. During The Great Migration, those with the Rowland name settled in the states of Virginia, North Carolina, New York, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, Connecticut, Georgia, and Pennsylvania. John Rowland was the first recorded settler in America with the Rowland surname, and he landed in the state of Virginia in 1635. Shortly after John Rowland settled in America, both Jo Rowland, aged twenty-one years, and Richard Roland, aged twenty years, sailed in the year 1635 as well. Jo Rowland landed in Bermuda, and Richard Rowland landed in the state of Virginia. Lewis Rowland and Daniel Rowland both settled in the state of Virginia between the years of 1652 and 1653. Lewis Rowland landed in the state of Virginia in 1652, while Daniel Rowland settled in the state of Virginia in 1653.

Scotland:

In Scotland, the surname of Rowland originated in the Ayrshire region. From this central location, the name swept across Scotland, spreading into Lanarkshire, Stirlingshire, Midlothian, East Lothian, Roxburghshire, Orkney Island, and Inverness-shire.

Wales

In the north of Wales, Rowland was a common personal name. The first location it could have emerged as a surname was in Caenarvonshire. In 1671, John Rowlands became a successful banker in London, and returned to Wales to build his home at Pla y Nant. The family line would remain there for 100 years.

Ireland

The Rowland surname in Ireland is the anglicized version of O’Rothlain, meaning descendant of Rothlain. One Rowland family from Ireland would emigrate to Iowa in 1854.

Rowland Today:

United States 40,354

Nigeria 23,689

England 13, 428

Australia 3,641

Canada 2,507

South Africa 2,338

Uganda 1,120

Wales 892

New Zealand 812

Ghana 639

Notable People:

Michael Evan “Mike” Rowland (born in 1953) former MLB (Major League Baseball) pitcher from America, who played from the year 1980 to the year 1981

Michael Rowland (1963-2004) jockey from America who died as a result of head injuries sustained during a race in February of the year 2004

Clarence Henry “Pants” Rowland (1879-1969) former MLB (Major League Baseball) manager for the Chicago White Sox from the year 1915 to the year 1918, from America

Landon H. Rowland (1937-2015) former 15th President of Kansas City Southern Railway from the year 1990 to the year 1991, from America

Wirt C. Rowland (1887-1946) who was an architect from America

Frank Sherwood Rowland (1927-2012) who was a chemistry professor at the University of California at Irvine, and was an American Nobel laureate

Major John Sharpe Rowland (1795-1863) who was the Superintendent of the Western and Atlantic Railroad during the American Civil War, and was also an American planter and politician in South Carolina and Georgia

John A. Rowland who was an early settler and rancher in America in the nineteenth century, in the San Gabriel Valley area of Los, Angeles California, and Rowland Heights, California was named after him

John Howell “Bo” Rowland (1903-1964) who was an American football player, and coach of both the sports of football, and basketball

Roy Rowland (1910-1995) was an American film director who was nominated for the American Directors Guild of America, and also was married to the MGM (Means Great Movies) chief, Louis B. Mayer

Kelly Rowland, who is an American model, dancer, and former singer of the group Destiny’s Child

Rowland Family Gift Ideas

Browse Rowland family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Carew, in the Isle of Anglesea). Or, a lion ramp. gu.
2) (co. Salop). (Saxonbury Lodge, Frant, co. Sussex). Or, three pales gu. Crest—Out of a, ducal coronet or, a demi talbot ar.
3) (Egham and Barnes, co. Surrey). Sa. a pile wavy ar.
4) Sa. a pile wavy ar. issuing from the dexter chief to the sinister base. Crest—A demi lion ramp gu. holding by the blade a sword erect, hilt or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pile
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water