Russell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Russell Family Coat of Arms

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Russell Coat of Arms Meaning

Russell Name Origin & History

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Russell Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Russell blazon are the lion rampant, escallop, cross crosslet fitchee and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, sable and gules .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Russell Name

Russell Origin:

France, England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Russell is said to be a noble and famous name throughout the ages in specifically British history. This surname of Russell is a patronymic form of a nickname, which can be translated to mean “the son of Red.” This nickname comes from the Old French words “Rous” which can be translated to mean “red” and was used as a nickname for someone who had red hair, or a red beard, and the suffix “el” which can be translated to mean “little.” Thus, the literal translation of this surname can be denoted as “little red.” It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. In this case, the surname of Russell directly derives from the nickname “Rous” which is used for someone who has red hair. This surname is patronymic, meaning that an element of it translates to mean “son of” which in this case is “el.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Roussell, Russello, Russelli, Russelle, Russella, Reusseell, Raussell, Rrussell, Ruussell, Russel, Rousell, Rowsell

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Russell is found within the country of England. One person by the name of Robert Rousel was mentioned in the Winton Rolls of Hampshire in the year of 1115. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry I, who was known throughout history and commonly referred to as one “The Administrator.” King Henry I ruled from the year of 1100 to the year 1135. Other mentions of the surname of Russell throughout the country of England including the Russells of Shropshire, whose coat of arms is well known. This coat of arms depicts six gold martlets on a black shield. The population of people who carry the surname of Russell in the country of England is rather large; England has the second highest population in the world of people who bear the surname of Russell, following only the United States of America. The areas of England that have a high concentration of those who bear the surname of Russell can be found within the city of London, and the county of Yorkshire, as well as other coastal counties and towns in the North of England.

Scotland:

There is a population of people who carry the surname of Russell within the country of Scotland. The county that has the largest concentration of those who bear the surname of Russell is within Lanarkshire.

United States of America:

During the 1600’s, it became common to move to the United States of America to escape terrible living conditions and an overreaching government. The European settlers who were experiencing this began to migrate to the United States, and this movement of people was referred to as The European Migration. The first people who were recorded to bear the surname of Russell in the United States of America were both William and Walter Russell, who were among the first settlers to land in the state of Virginia, and one John Russell, who also settled in the state of Virginia in 1623.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Russell: United States 243,874; England 45,521; Australia 26,030; Canada 22,802; South Africa 9,461; Scotland 8,118; Jamaica 4,926; New Zealand 4,734; Ireland 3,287; Liberia 2,984

Notable People:

James C. “Jay” Russell Sr. (1928-2016) who was a politician from America, and who served as a Member of the Missouri House of Representatives from the year 1962 to the year 1988

Richard Lion Russell (1924-2015) who was a finance writer from America, and who is most notably recognized for the newsletter that he created called The Dow Theory Letters which began in the year 1958

Jeanne K. Russell (born in 1950) who is an actress from America, and who is most notably recognized for her appearance on the TV series Dennis the Menace which ran from the year 1959 to the year 1963, she played Dennis’s best friend and playmate, who was named Margaret Wade

Major-General Henry Dozier Russell (1889-1972) who was a Commanding General in the 48th Division from the year 1944 to the year 1945

Brigadier-General Clinton Warden Russell (1891-1943) who was a War Department Liason Officer with Admiral Ernest J. King in the year 1942 to the year 1943

Brigadier-General Carl Austin Russell (1892-1948) who was the Deputy Chief of the Theater Group for Ground Forces, and who served on the War Department General Staff from the year 1939 to the year 1945

Russell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Russell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Kingston-Russell, co. Dorset, represented by the ducal house of Bedford; descended from Sir Ralph Russell, who m. Isabel, dau. and co-heir of James de Newmarch, Baron of Newmarch, and had livery, 8 Henry III., of all her lands in the cos. of Somerset, Wilts, and Gloucester. From an old record, temp. Henry III., it appears that the Rossells, barons of high renown in the co. Gloucester, held Kingston-Russell, near Burton, co. Dorset, by grand serjeantry, viz., “that they should present a cup of beer to our Sovereign Lord the King on the four principal feasts of the year ”). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three escallops of the first.
2) (Duke of Bedford). Motto—Che sara sara. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three escallops of the first. Crest—A goat pass. ar. armed or. Supporters—Dexter, a lion; sinister, an antelope; both gu. the latter ducally gorged and lined or, armed and hoofed gold.
3) (Earl Russell). Motto—Che sara sara. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three escallops of the field, over the centre escallop a mullet. Crest—A goat pass. ar. armed and unguled or. Supporters—Dexter, a lion gu.; sinister, an heraldic antelope gu. armed, unguled, and tufted, ducally gorged and chained, the chain reflexed over the back or, each supporter charged on the shoulder with a mullet ar.
4) (Baron de Clifford). Motto—Che sara sara. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three escallops of the first. Crest—A goat statant ar. armed or. Supporters—Dexter, a wyvern gu.; sinister, a monkey ppr. ringed round the loins and lined or.
5) (Earl of Orford, extinct 1727; Edward Russell, second son of Hon. Edward Russell, second son of Francis; fourth Earl of Bedford, Admiral R.N., having achieved a victory over the French at La Hogue, was raised to the peerage 1697, d. s. p.). Motto—Che sara sara. Same Arms and Crest, a crescent for diff. Supporters—Dexter, a lion; sinister, an antelope; both gu. and supporting an anchor sa.
6) (Swallowfield, co. Berks, bart.). Motto—Discite justiam moniti. Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three cross crosslets fitchée az. a border engr. gu. charged alternately with bezants and escallops or. Crest—A demi lion ramp. erm. charged with a fasces ppr. and bearing in his dexter paw a cross crosslet fitchée sa.
7) (Charlton Park, co. Gloucester, bart.). Motto—Nitor donec supero. Ar. a chev. betw. three goutes reversed sa. the whole within a border gyronny of eight in eight divisions or and of the second. Crest—A fountain.
8) (Chippenham, co. Cambridge, bart., extinct 1804; Sir William Russell, Knt., of Chippenham, descended from Thomas Russell, Esq., of Yaverland, Isle of Wight, who d. 16 Henry VI., a.d. 1437, was created a bart. 1629; the tenth bart. d. s. p., when his estate devolved on his aunt, Mary Russell, sister of the eighth bart., bedchamber woman to the Princess Amelia, and at her death unm. passed to her first cousin, Rev. John Russell Greenhill, LL.D., whose son was created a bart. 1831). (Laugharne, co. Carmarthen, bart.. extinct 1714; Sir William Russell, Knt., of Laugharne, ninth son of Sir William Russell, first bart. of Chippenham, was created a bart. 1660, and d. 1714, s. p. m.). (Checquer’s Court, co. Bucks, bart., extinct 1837; Rev. Samuel Greenhill, of Swincombe. co. Oxford, m. Elizabeth, dan. of John Russell, Govemor of Fort William, Bengal, and granddau. of Sir John Russell, third bart. of Chippenham, and had a son, Rev. John Russell Greenhill, who s. to the Checquers estate of the Russell family; his only son, Robert Greenhill, assumed the surname of Russell, by royal licence, 1815, and was created a bart. 1831, d. unm., when the estate passed to his kinsman, Sir Robert Frankland, seventh bart. of Thirkelby, co. York, who then assumed, by royal licence, the additional surname of Russell). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three roses of the first. Crest—A goat ar. attired or, murally gorged gold.
9) (Frankland-Russell, bart.; Sir Thomas Frankland, second bart. of Thirkelby, m. Elizabeth, second dau. of Sir John Russell, third bart. of Chippenham, by Frances, his wife, dau. of Olives Cromwell; his descendant, Sir Robert Frankland, seventh bart. of Thirkelby, his kinsman Sir Robert (Greenhill) Russell, Bart., of Checquers Court, assumed, by royal licence, the additional surname of Russell, and d. 1849, leaving four daus. his co-heirs, when the baronetcy of Thirkelby reverted to his kinsman and heir male, Sir Frederick William Frankland, as eighth bart.). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three roses of the first, for Russell; 2nd and 3rd, az. a dolphin naiant embowed or, on a chief of the last two saltires gu., for Frankland. Crests— 1st, Russell: A goat statant ar. murally gorged, armed, and hoofed or; 2nd, Frankland: An anchor erect ppr. entwined with a dolphin haurient ar.
10) (Strensham, co. Worcester, bart., extinct 1705; descended from Thomas De Russell, fourth son of Robert De Russell, of Kingston-Russell, the ancestor of the Duke of Bedford: Sir John Russell Master of the Horse to Richard II., was father of William Russell, Esq., of Strensham; Sir John Russell, Knt., of Strensham, d. 15 Aug. 1556; William Russell, Esq., of Strensham, fourth in descent from Sir John, was created a bart. 1627, his son, the second bart., left three daus. co-heirs. Visit. Worcester, 1533, 1634, and 1682-3). Ar. a chev. betw. three crosses botonnée fitchée sa. a border or, Visit. 1633. Ar. a chev. betw. three crosses crosslet sa., Visit. 1634. Crest—A chessrook or, thereon a plume of ostrich feathers gold and az.
11) (Brancepeth castle, co. Durham; formerly of Arnabie, co. Cumberland, where the family was resident for many generations. The late representative, William Russell, Esq., of Brancepeth Castle, only son of Matthew Russell, Esq., of same place, by his wife, a sister of the Right Hon. Charles Tennyson-D'Eyncourt, d. s.p., when the estates devolved on Gustavus Frederick, seventh Viscount Boyne, the husband of his sister). Ar. on a chev. betw. three crosses crosslet fitchée sa. an escallop or. Crest—A goat pass. ar.
12) (Blackbraes, co. Stirling, 1800). Motto—Che sara sara. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. betw. three pewits sa. on a chief of the third a fountain betw. two mullets or. Crest—A goat pass. holding in the mouth a thistle ppr.
13) (Hamilton-Russell, Viscount Boyne; Gustavus Frederick, seventh Viscount Boyne, m. 1828, Emma Maria, dau. of Matthew Russell, Esq., of Brancepeth Castle, and having succeeded to that estate, assumed, by royal licence, the additional surname of Russell). Motto—Nec timeo, nec sperno. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. betw. two chevronels a cinquefoil, all betw. three cross crosslets fitchée sa., for Russell; 2nd and 3rd, gu. three cinquefoils pierced erm., for Hamilton. Crests—1st, Russell: A goat pass. ar. collar gemell, and charged on the body with an escallop sa.; 2nd, Hamilton: Out of a ducal coronet or, an oak fructed of the first and penetrated transversely in the main stem by a frame-saw all ppr. Supporters—Two mermaids ppr. hair dishevelled or, each holding in the exterior hand a mirror of the last.
14) (Powick Court, co. Worcester; descended from Thomas Russell Esq., of Cardington, co. Salop, m. Dorothy Corfield, and had a son, John Russell, Esq., of Holgate b. 1608, whose great-grandson, William Russell, Esq., of Worcester, b. 1719, purchased Slaughters Court, now called Powick Court; his son, William Russell, Esq., of Powick, J. P., b. 1750, m. Elizabeth, sister and heir of Sir John Pakington, Bart., of Aylesbury, co. Bucks, and d. 1812, leaving a son and heir, John Somerset Russell, who assumed, by royal licence, the name and arms of Pakington, was created a bart. 1846, and a peer, as Lord Hampton, 1874. See Pakington, Lord Hampton). Motto—Fidelis et audax. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a chief gu. three bezants, for Russell; 2nd, or, on a chev. gu. three cocks' heads erased ar. combed and wattled of the first, for Phillips; 3rd, ar. a fess dancettee gu., for Chetle. Crest—A talbot pass. ar.
15) (Little Malvern Court, co. Worcester, and co. Hereford; descended from John Russell. m. Joan, dau. and heir of William Alderford, and was father of John Russell, whose son, John Russell, was secretary to the Princess Mary, afterwards Mary I., at Tickenhill Palace, and was appointed, 33 Henry VIII., a.d. 1541, Forester and Keeper of the Woods of the Priory of Little Malvern. John Russell, Esq., of Little Malvern, temp. George III., the last male descendant, left an only dau. and heir, Elizabeth, m. Thomas Baeinoton, Esq.). Motto—Je tiens foy. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a chev. betw. three crosses crosslet sa. a border engr. gu. bezanteée, for Russell; 2nd and 3rd, ar. on a saltire az. a tiger’s head erased or, for Alderford. Crest—A demi lion ar. holding betw. the paws across crosslet fitchée sa.
16) (Moor Green, co. Worcester, and King’s Heath, same co.; William Russell, Esq., M.P. for the co., and. High Sheriff 1839, had an only dau. and heir, Elizabeth Mary Russell, m. 1839, Joseph Bailey, eldest son of Sir Joseph Bailey, first bart. of Glanusk, and was mother of the second bart.). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three escallops of the first. Crest—A goat pass. ar. attired or.
17) (Hanley, co. Worcester; Russell, of Hanley Castle, appears in Penn’s List of those "That are to finde horse,” in co. Worcester). Ar. a chev. betw. three crosses botounée fitchée sa.
18) (Bosbourne, co. Worcester). Same Arms, a border sa.
19) (Handsworth, co. Stafford.) Motto—Quo fata vocant. Ar. a fess dancettée ermines betw. three crosses crosslet fitchée in chief and two in base sa. Crest—In front of two palm branches saltireways vert a fret or, thereon a martlet sa.
20) (Derham, or Dyrham, co. Gloucester). Ar. on a chief gu. three bezants.
21) (Stubbers, North Ockendon, co. Essex, Towcester, co. Northampton, and Southwark, co. Surrey). Ar. on a chev. betw. three crosses crosslet fitchée sa. an escallop or. Crest—A demi lion ramp. ar. collared gu. charged on the body with a chev. sa. thereon an escallop or, holding betw. the paws a cross crosslet fitchée of the third.
22) (Ham Hall, co. Stafford, and Biggin Grange, co. Northampton). Motto—Memor, amici. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, erm. a lion ramp. gu. collared ar. on a chief az. three roses of the third, for Russell; 2nd and 3rd, az. a bend engr. erminois betw. two crescents or (a canton gu. for diff.), for Watts. Crests—1st: On a mount vert a goat pass. erm. collared sa., for Russell; 2nd: A demi lion ramp. or, charged on the shoulder with a cross pattée az. the paws supporting an escutcheon of the last, thereon a fesse erminois betw. three fleurs-de-lis in chief and a cross pattée in base of the first, on an escroll issuant from the escutcheon the word “Amici” (and for diff. in the mouth of the lion a. slip of oak ppr.), for Watts.
23) (co. Essex, and Pemsoy, co. Sussex). Or, on a cross sa. five mullets ar. Crest—An adder’s head erased ppr. collared gu. ringed or.
24) (co. Gloucester). Erm. on a chief gu. three bezants (another, plates).
25) (Lord Mayor of London 1299 and 1300). Gu. on a fess erm. betw. three swans ar. as many mullets sa.
26) (London). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. a chief wavy az. on a canton or, an eagle displ. sa.
27) (Henley-upon-Thames and London). Gu. on a fess erm. betw. three swans ar. as many mullets of the first pierced or, all within a border engr. of the last.
28) (co. Northampton). Ar. a chev. az. betw. three hurts.
29) (co. Norfolk). Ar. a lion ramp. and a border gu.
30) (Badham, Thorpe, and West Burnam, co. Norfolk). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. a border of the last. Crest—A demi goat ar. attired or.
31) (co. Rutland). Az. a chev. betw. three roses or.
32) (John Russell, Bishop of Rochester, 1476-80, and of Lincoln, 1480-94). Az. two chevronels or, betw. three roses ar.
33) (arms of John Russell in the church of Taynton, co. Oxford. Visit. Oxon, 1566). Ar. a chev. betw. three crosses crosslet fitchée sa.
34) (Brocton, co. Salop; quartered hy Corfield, of Chatwell Hall; Thomas Corfield m. in 1610, Anne, dau. and co-heir of Edward Russell, Esq., of Euchmarsh and Hollyhurst). Ar. a chev. betw. three crosses crosslet sa.
35) (co. Dorset). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. a bezant betw. two escallops of the first. Crest—A demi Indian goat ramp. ar. attire, ears, hoofs, and beard sa.
36) (Workington, co. Cumberland). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three roses of the field. Crest—A goat pass. ar. attired or.
37) (Falmouth, co. Cornwall). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three escallops sa.
38) (co. Salop). Sa. a fess betw. six martlets or.
39) (Kentchurch, co. Hereford). Ar. on a bend sa. three swans ppr. membered and armed gu.
40) (co. Wilts). Or, on a bend sa. three swans ar. (another adds, three mullets ar.).
41) (Witley, co. Worcester). Sa. an inescutcheon engr. ar. charged with a chev. az. betw. three crosses crosslet fitchée of the field.
42) (granted 1618). Ar. on a fess dancettée sa. betw. three martlets gu. seven bezants. Crest—On a bezant a Cornish chough sa. wings expanded, beaked and legged
43) Ar. a fess gu. betw. three tridents sa. Crest—A. goat pass. ar. holding a trident, as in the arms.
44) (Government Park, Island of Jamaica; Robert Russell, Esq., of that place). Motto—Suum cuique. Gu. on a pile betw. two roses in base ar. a rose of the field all barbed and seeded ppr. Crest—A demi leopard ppr. gorged with a collar gemel or, and holding in the dexter paw a spur leathered also or.
45) Ar. a chev. betw. three crosses crosslet fitchée sa. Crest—A pyramid of leaves az.
46) Or, on a fesse embattled and counter-embattled sa. betw. three leopards' faces gu. an estoile (another, a mullet of six points) betw. two crescents ar.
47) Gu. on a chev. betw. three mullets ar. as many ducks sa.
48) Ar. a lion ramp gu. a chief sa.
49) Gu. on a bend sa. three ducks ar.
50) Or, on a chief sa. five mullets ar.
51) Paly of eight or and gu. a chief az.
52) Gu. a saltire betw. four leopards’ faces or.
53) Az. a fess betw. six martlets or.
54) Ar. on a fess dancettée sa. betw. three martlets gu. as many plates.
55) Gu. three pales or, a chief az.
56) Sa. a chev. betw. three roses ar.
57) Ar. a fess betw. three pairs of pincers gu.
58) Ar. on a fess gu. three bezants.
59) Ar. on a bend sa. three swans ppr.
60) Ar. a chev. betw. three roses gu.
61) Ar. three buglehorns stringed sa. garnished vert.
62) Gu. a bend sa. cotised or, betw. two mullets and as many swans ar.
63) Gu. on a bend ar. three roses of the first.
64) Sa. a lion ramp. within a bordure gu.
65) Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three escallops of the first. Crest—A goat pass, attired or.
66) Erm. a crescent gu.
67) another, Or, a chev. az. betw. three roses gu.
68) Az. on a chev. ar. three roses gu.
69) Az. three battle-axes ar.
70) Erm. a fret or, a chief gu.
71) (Baron of Killough, in the co. Down; descended from Russell, of Kingston-Russell, co. Dorset, a cadet of which house accompanied Sir John De Courcy to Ireland, temp. Henry II., and assisted him in the conquest of Ulster, from whom he received a grant of the lordships of Killough and Rathmullen, with cognizance of such pleas as constituted the possessor “ Unus Baronum Libertatis comitatis Ultoniæ." Jacob Russell was Baron of Killough, 1316; from him descended the subsequent Barons of Killough; Russell, of Quoniamstown, co. Devon, now representative of the Barons of Killough; Russell, of Seaton, co. Dublin; and Russell, of Collinstown, in same co. George Russell, Baron of Killough, d. 1598, leaving three sons: 1) Nicholas, Baron of Killough, who with his son and heir, Patrick, made an alienation of the barony and lands of Killough to his next brother: 2) John, ancestor of Russell, of Sheephouse, co. Meath; 3) James, ancestor of Russell, of Quoniamstown, co. Down). Ar. a lion ramp. gu.
72) (Sheephouse, co. Meath; descended from John Russell, second son of George Russell, Baron of Killough, d. 1598, to whom his elder brother Nicholas alienated Killough; his great-great-grandson, Thomas Russell, Esq., of Sheephouse, had six sons, all living in 1690). Same Arms. Crest—A demi lion ramp. gu.
73) (Quoniamstown, co. Down; descended from James Russell, third son of George Russell, Baron of Killough, d. 1598; the late Thomas John Russell, Baron of Killough, of Quoniamatown, representative of the family, was created a Count of the Papal States by Pope Pius IX., by letters patent dated 22 Aug. 1862, and was s., by his eldest son, Henry Patrick Marie Russell, a distinguished I traveller, now representative of the family). Motto—Che sara sara. Same Arms and Crest, quartering, Az. fretty or, on a fess ar. a boar pass, gu., for McCann, Henry Russell, Baron of Killough, the grandfather of George Russell, Baron of Killough, d. 1598, having m. Judith, dau. and heir of Cabbery McCann, of Mointnaugh.
74) (Seaton, co. Dublin; descended from Russell, Baron of Killough; confirmed by Carney, Ulster, to Bartholomew Russell, Esq., of Seaton, son and heir of Christopher Russell fifth in descent from John Russell, of same place, who was chief of the ancient house of that name in Ireland). (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1595, George Russell, Clerk of the Council in Dublin). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three escallops of the first, a border of the second.
75) (Collinstown, co. Dublin; Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office, 1619, Nicholas Russell, of that place). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief az. three escallops of the field, a border of the second. Crest (Reg. Ulster's Offlce) — A demi lion ramp. gu.
76) (Cookestown, co. Meath; Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office, 1624, Amy, wife of David Russell, of that place). Same Arms, a crescent for diff.
77) (Ballymacscanlon, co. Louth, and Jamaica; allowed by Hawkins, Ulster, 1714, as the arms of James Russell, of Jamaica, fourth son of Capt. Thomas Russell, of Ballymacscanlon, who was great-grandson of George Russell, Esq., of Sheephouse, the second son of George Russell Esq., of Killough). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three escallops ar. Crest—A demi lion ramp. gu.
78) (Brownstown and Bringham, co. Dublin; confirmed by Carney, Ulster, 1686, to Robert Russell,, Esq., of Brownstown, J.P. co. Dublin; the crest formerly granted to Patrick Russell, Esq., of Brownstown, the great-grandfather of Robert Brown, for his eminent service in the wars with O’Neill, temp. Queen Elizabeth, when he unhorsed O’Neill and took him prisoner). Quarterly, 1 st and 4th, ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief sa. three escallops of the first; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a lion ramp gu. on a chief sa. three escallops of the first, a border of the second. Crest—A demi lion ramp. or, holding betw. the paws an escutcheon ar. thereon a dexter hand couped at the wrist and erect gu. bearing the arms of O’Neill, motto over, Now St. Patrick for Ireland. Motto—In solo regit qui degit in coelo.
79) (Dublin; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1620, Thomas Russell, Sheriff of Dublin). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. on a chief az. three escallops of the fleld, a border gobony of the second and first.
80) (Galway; granted by Carney, Ulster, 1685, to Col. Theodore Russell, Governor and Mayor of Galway, formerly Colonel of a foot company in the service ot Charles II.). Motto—Fortitudo fidelis honore munerata. Per chev. embattled or and gu. three crosses crosslet fitchée counterchanged. Crest—On a laurel branch a raven all ppr.
81) (that Ilk, Scotland). Ar. a chev. betw. three pewits sa.
82) (Kingseat, co. Peebles). Motto—Agitatione purgatus. Same Arms, a border sa. Crest—A fountain ppr.
83) (Charlton Park, co. Gloucester, bart., 1832). Motto—Promptus. Ar. a chev. betw. three pewits sa. the whole within a border gyronny of eight or and of the second. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi eagle rising ppr. gorged with a mural crown or.
84) (Ashiestiel, co. Selkirk). Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three pewits sa. a mullet or, a bordure engr. az. Crest and Motto, as Kingseat.
85) (Longridge, co. Lanark, 1759). Motto—Virtus sine macula. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. betw. two crescents sa. and as many suns ppr. on a chief az. three mullets of the first. Crest—A dexter hand holding a skene ppr. and on the point thereof u pair of balances also ppr.
86) (Montcoffer, co. Banff, 1768). Quarterly, 1st, ar. a lion ramp. gu. and in chief two crescents sa.; 2nd, gu. three dirks paleways ppr. hilted and pommelled or, on the point of each a wolf's head of the last; 3rd, az. a chev. ar. betw. three suns in their splendour ppr.; 4th, gyronny of eight or and sa. Crest—A dexter hand issuing from a cloud brandishing a sword ppr.
87) (Rathen, co. Aberdeen, 1778). Motto—Memor esto. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a lion ramp gu. in chief a buck’s head cabossed of the last betw. two crescents sa.; 2nd and 3rd. gyronny of eight erm. and sa. Crest—A boar's head couped ppr.
88) (London, from Scotland, 1839). Motto—Eundo. Ar. a pile engr. az. semée of roses of the field. Crest—Out of a mural crown ar. the head of a, Newfoundland dog sa. collared or, the neck and breast also ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché