Robinson Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Robinson Family Coat of Arms

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Robinson Name Origin & History

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Robinson Name

Surname Name Meaning, Origin, and Etymology
This is a baptismal surname meaning “the son of Robin”. Robin is a diminutive of the old Anglo-Saxon personal (first name) Robert. It derives from the Germanic/Teutonic words hrothi and bertha, meaning “fame bright”. The name Robert was introduced into Britain from mainland Europe during the Norman Conquest of 1066 AD and it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. The name was born by numerous Kings and other nobles (ex. Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland in 1306 and Robert I King of France in 922 AD). There was a character in English folklore called Robin Goodfellow (or Puck) that was a sprite or fairy known for his mischievous behavior who may have popularized the use of this given name. The family was first established in northern England along the Scottish border, yeomanry who bore the stag trippant as their armorial bearing.

Spelling Variations
Common spelling variants or names with similar etymologies include Robin, Robins, and Robbins. Foreign equivalents include Robbi (Norse) and Robyns (Flemish).

Popularity & Geographic Distribution
The last name ranks Rogers ranks 27th in popularity in terms in the United Status as of the 2000 Census, and. The name ranks particularly high in the following six states:  Michigan, Alabama, South Carolina, Maryland, Mississippi, and Delaware. In England, the last name is also very common: it ranks 15th in popularity. It ranks highest in the eight following counties: Yorkshire, Lancashire, Durham, Lincolnshire, Cumberland, Northamptonshire, Westmorland, Bedfordshire. The name is common throughout the English speaking world:  Scotland (111th), Wales (53rd), Ireland (369th), Canada (30th), New Zealand (16th), Australia (24th), and South Africa (278th).

The 1890 book Homes of Family Names by H.B. Guppy states “Distributed all over England, except in the southwest, where it is either absent or extremely rare. Its great home is in the northern half of the country, the numbers rapidly diminishing as we approach the south of England. Northamptonshire may be characterised as the most advanced stronghold of the Robinsons on their way to the metropolis. Robson, which is, I suppose, a contraction of this name, is essentially a north of England name, being very numerous in Northumberland and county Durham, and extending in diminished numbers across the border into the shires of Roxburgh and Dumfries”. It should also be noted that many of the bearers of this name live in the Province of Ulster.

Early Bearers of the Surname
The Hundred Rolls of 1273 AD, a census of Wales and England, known in Latin as Rotuli Hundredorum, documents two people bearing this surname: Dera Robins in county Cambridgeshire and John Robin in county Oxfordshire. The Poll Tax of Yorkshire in 1379 AD lists two people bearing this surname:  Roger Robynsoun, Roger Robyn-man (the servant of Robin), and Adam Robyn-man. A one John Richard Robunson in 1324 AD in the Court Rolls of the manor of Wakefield. The tenement (apartment house) of John Robynson in Irvine (a city in North Ayshire, Scotland) is mentioned in 1426 AD. John Robynsone was bailie (a municipal or civic offier) of Glasgow in 1477 AD. An early baptism includes Arthur Robinsonne at St. Peter Cornhill in London in 1606.

History, Genealogy, and Ancestry
The famous genealogist Bernard Burke’s book “The Landed Gentry” discusses three branches of this family: Robinson of Denston Hall, Robinson of Knapton House, and Robinson of Silksworth.

The first branch begins with a mention of Christopher William Robinson, Esq. of Denston Hall in county Suffolk and Dullingham House in county Cambridgeshire. He was born in 1830 and assumed the name and arms of Jeaffreson and in 1870 he married Mary, daughter of John Dunn Gardner of Chatteris. Burke traces the lineage or pedigree of this branch to Christopher Heaffreson who was born in 1699.

The second branch begins with a mention of Sir Henry Robinson, Knight of Knapton House Norfolk who was Justice of the Peace and DL,L, as well as Standard Bearer and Lieutenant Commander of the Queen’s Body Guard of Gentlemen-at-Arms. He was born in 1805 and in 1842 he married Lucy, daughter of William Dodge Cooper-Cooper of Todington Manor and had five children with her: Henry Matthew Cooper (1851), Constance (married Reverend W.H. Cooke), Elizabeth Caroline, Lucy Henrietta Maria (married Commander Albert Battiscombe, Royal Navy of the Daedalus), and Georgina Lindsay. He was the son of George Robinson and Hannah Atkinson.

The third branch begins with a mention of William Robinson Robinson, Esq. of Silksworth Hall in county Durham who was Justice of the Peace and D.L. He was born in 1804 and in May of 1839 he married Sarah Dorothy, daughter of William Grey of Norton and had the following issue with her: William Grey (1846), Thomas Middleton (1849, Lieutenant of 14th Regiment),  John George (1852), Sarah Margaret (married Lieutenant Colonel William Hopper Williamson in Brussels), Elizabeth Joanna, Mary Ann, and Harriet Grey. He was the son of Thomas Robinson Grey. Burke traces the lineage of this line back to Thomas Robinson of Sunderland in county Durham who in 1727 married Margaret, daughter and co-heir of Sir William Middleton. They had issue together: William (his heir), Thomas (1728), Anne (married Chipchase Grey), Margaret, and Elizabeth (married Adam Scott, Esquire and M.D.).  The family bore the a coat of arms with the following heraldic blazon: Vert, gutte d’eau on a chevron between three bucks trippant or, as many cinquefoils gules for Robinson, quartering Ettrick, Middleton, Strivelyn, Heyton, Wharton, Ayre, Greyt, and Kirkby.

Edward Robinson was born in 1170 AD in Donnington, Somerset, England. He had a son named John who was born in 1191 AD in the same town. John married Albreda Gifford and had a son with her also named John. This John was born in 1217 in the same town and married Elizabeth Pannall. They had a son named Richard. Richard was born in 1249 AD and married Edith Colvil. They had a son named Thomas who was born in 1270 AD. Thomas married Edith Reppes and they had a son named James. James was born in 1300 AD in Cambridge, England. He married Thomasine Fielding and they had a son named Richard. Richard Robinson was born in 1330 in Yorkshire and he married Isabel Hastings with whom he had a son named John. John was born in 1360 and he married Anne (Baikie) Gunn. Together they had a son named George who was born in 1380 AD in Halbertt Castle, Caithness, Scotland. George was known as “The Gunn” and prior to his death in Germany, he had a son named Robert. Robert was born in 1465 in Redriff, Surrey. He had four children: John, Robert, Catherine, and Christopher. His son Christopher was born in 1502 in Nottinghamshire and he married Anne Savage. They had three issue together: Elizabeth (Lord), Christopher, and William. His son Christopher was born in 1520 in Steeple, Essex and he married Anne Fenton.  They had five issue together: John, Amy, Elizabeth, William, and Bennett. His son John was born in 1551 in Sturton, Nottinghamshire. He married a woman named Ann and had several children with her including John, Katherine, Mary Ellen, and Ann. His son Reverend John Robinson was born in 1576 and he married Bridget White. They had many issue together: Ann, William, John, Thomas, Bridget (Lee), William, John, Thomas, Isaac, James, John, Mercy, Samuel, Favor, William, Fear, and Jacob. His son Thomas was born in 1607 in the Netherlands. He went to America and married a woman named Mary Cogan with whom he had the following issue: Josiah, Samuel, Ephraim, Thomas, James, Joseph, and Mary. His son Thomas was born in Scituate, Massachusetts in 1653 and he married Sarah Denison Perkins. They had six children: Elizabeth, Joseph, Thomas, Sarah (Perry), John, and James. His son James was born in Roxbury, MA in 1689 and he married Patience Ruggles with whom he had the following issue: Sarah, James, Thomas, Samual, Thomas, Dorothy, Denison, Joseph, and Hannah. His son Denison was born in 1725 and married Martha Perry. They had children together including Joseph, Lucy, Abigail, Martha, Denison, Elizabeth, Elijah, and Hannah. His son Elijah Robinson was born in 1765 in Barre, MA. He married Bathsheba Nye and they had issue: Samuel Ruggles, Nancy, Dennison, Alice R., William Nye, Martha P. and Arathusa Jones. His son Samuel was born in 1788 in the same town and he married Sally Converse. They had the following issue together: Lemuel, Carolin, Jaspar Rupert, Alice Ruggles, Bathsheba Nye, and Abigail Keeler. His daughter Carolina was born in 1823 in Vermont and married Daniel Reynolds with whom she had numerous issue.

Early American and New World Settlers
Early colonial settlers include: 1) Edward Robinson who came to St. Christopher’s Barbados in 1634,  2) Robert Robinson who came to New England from the port of London aboard the Christian in March of 1634, 3) David & Joseph Robinson who came to the Barbados aboard the Peter Bonaventure in 1635, 4) Thomas Robinson who came to the Barbados aboard the Ann & Elizabeth in 1635, 5) William Robinson who came to Barbados in 1635 aboard the Mathew of London, 6) Joseph Robinson who came to Virginia board the Thomas & John in June of 1635, 7) Elizabeth Robison who came to New England aboard the Blessing, with Nicholas (her husband?) and Sara (her daughter?) and Joseph, Mary, and Katharine, 8) Mathew and John Robinson who came to Virginia in 1635 aboard the America, 9) Thomas Robinson came to Virginia aboard the Assurance in July 1635, 10) Henrie Robinson who came to Virginia aboard the Primrose in 1635, 11) Joyce Robinson who came in the Globe to Virginia in 1635, 12) Mary Robinson who came in the George in August of 1635,13) Isack Robinson who came to New England in the Hopwell in September 1635, 14) Joseph & Thomas Robinson who came to Barbados in the Expedition in November 1635, 15) Leonard who came to the Barbados in the Falcon in December 1635, 16) Sir Robert Robinson (Governor of Bermuda), 17) Christopher Robinson (Secretary of Virginia), 18) Richard Robinson who lived at the Indian thicket in Virginia in 1623, 19) John who lived in Virginia (at Elizabeth Cittie?)  in 1623, 20) William Robinson who lived at Warwick Squeak, 21) John Robinson who came on the Margrett and John in 1622 at the age of 21, 22) Jeremy Robinson of Singleton who was 28 years who was a hoopmaker, 23) William Robinson, son of Leonard and Ann, was baptized in 1679 in Barbados, 24) James Robinson in the Barbados (had 6 acres of land, two servants, and one slave),and 25) John in the Barbados (had 12 acres of land and 4 slaves).

Other early American settlers include John (Virginia, 1606), Isaac & Bridget Robinson (Plymouth, MA in 1629), Constance Robinson (New England 1634), Goodwyn John Robinson (Maryland 1637), Daniell Robinson (Boston 1651), George Robinson (Virginia 1706), and David Robinson (South Carolina 1716). One of the earliest settlers in Canada was William Robinson who came in 1677 to Ferryland, Newfoundland.

Mottoes
The Robinson family has various mottoes including: 1) Foi est tout (Faith is everything), 2) Qualis ab incepto (The same as the beginning), 3) Virtute non verbis (By valour not by boasting), 4) Sola in Deo salus (Safety alone in God), 5) Spes mea in futuro est (My hope is in the future), 6) Propere et provide (Quickly and cautiously), 7) *Vincam malum bono (I will overcome evil by good), 8) Loyal au mort (Loyal to death), 9) Post nubila Phoebus (After clouds sunshine), 10) Virtus pretiosior auro (Virtue is more precious than gold), 11) Intemerata fides (Faith undefiled), 12) Dulcis amor patriae (The love of one’s country is sweet).

*Be not overcome of evil, but overcome evil with good, Romans XII 21

Grantees
We have 56 coats of arms for the Rodgers surname depicted here. These 56 blazons are from Bernard Burke’s book The General Armory of England, Ireland, and Scotland, which was published in 1848. The bottom of this page contains the blazons, and in many instances contains some historical, geographical, and genealogical about where coat of arms was found and who bore it.  Some people who bore Robinson family crests in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries include:

1) Robinson, George, M.P., of Carlisle, co. Cumberland, and Moor Place, Bucks., 25 Oct. 1731,
2) Samuel, Chamberlain of the Citv of London, 2 June 1728
3) Sir Thomas [Bart.]. K.B. [1742]. Supporters, [1742]
4) [Sir Thomas Robinson. Bart.], Baron Grantham [7 April 1761].
5) Robinson to Weddell. [7 May 1803, 2nd] Baron Grantham. Quarterly Arms, [1803]
6) Robinson , of Gosport. Hampsh.
7) William, of Bath, co. Somerset, late a Colonel, 1772,
8) Robinson to Hewett, (Dame Dorothea, wife of Sir George, Bart.), of co. Leic. and Northampton, 1773,
9) to Montagu [3 June 1776]. Matthew [4th] Baron Rokeby. of co. Northumberland and Kent, 1 July 1776,
10)Robinson, Morris, Baron Rokeby [of Armagh, by Ulster Bung of Arms]. [Supporters] 9 June 1801.
11) Robinson before Pease, Joseph. (Match), [1783]
12) Robinson, Thomas, of Kingston-upon-Huil, co. York, and Newark-upon-Trent, co. Nottingham.
13) Robinson, late Freind, Ven. John [Freind, Archd. of Armagh], of co. York (afterwards Bart. [14 Dec. 1819]
14) late wife of Boulton, of co. Staff. Arms to descendants, [1794]
15) of Whitbarrow, Greystoke, co. Cumberland, [1795]
16) of Streatham, co. Surrey, and Nottingham Place [London ?], [1807]
17) Margaret (Southwell, wife of), Capt. (Sir George Abercrombie] Robinson, Bart [11 Nov. 1823]), of London, [1807]
18) Robinson after Vyvyan, of Nansloe, Tresmarrow, Trelowarren, co. Cornw., and Lamerton, co. Devon [1818]
19) Robinson, Major C. B., of Birmingham, co. Warw., [1823]
20) Viscount Goderich [28 April 1827, Frederick John Robinson], (Marq. [Earl of] Ripon).
21) James Sunderland, of Ormesby, co. York, [1828]
22) Robinson to Burton, David, of Cherry Burton, co. York, and the Inner Temple, London, [1828]
23) to Lowten, . . . ., of CO. Lane, [1830]
24) of Kirby Frith, co. Leic, [^837]
25) of Tottenham (D.L.), co. Middx., [1838]
26) Robinson, late Grey, William Robinson, of Sunderland, Silksworth and Norton. all co. Durham, 1838,
27) William, of Liverpool and Seedly, co. Lane, [1839]
28) Robinson to Nowell, of co. York, and Westmorland, [1843]
29) of Chesham Street [London ?], [1845]
30) [John Beverley ?], C. J., C.B., Bart. [21 Sept. 1854], of Beverley House, Toronto, Upper Canada, [1854]
31) M.D., of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, co. Northumberland, Assist. Army Surgeon, [1856]
32) Robinson, late Jeafferson, Christopher William Pigott, of co. Camb. and Suff., 1857,
33) Robinson to Norcliffe, of co. York, [1862]
34) of Heathbank, Kersal, co. Lane, [1863]
35) Joseph Beryn, of (Robinson Estate) Griqualand, South Africa, [1873]
36) John Charles, of Newton, and Eight-holds, Swanage, co. Dorset, 1876,
37) F. E., of Stanmore, co. Middx., 1894,
38) Rev. Thomas, Vicar of Ewshot Hurst, Farnham, Hampsh., 1898

Notables
Famous people with this last name include: 1) Jack Roosevelt “Jackie” Robinson  (1919-1972) who was the first African American to play in Major League Baseball (MLB) in the United States, 2) Abraham Robinson (1918-1974) who was a mathematician known for non-stand analysis and infinite numbers, 3) Perry Morris Robinson (1938) who is an American jazz composer and clarinetist, 4) Ray Charles Robinson (1930-2004) who was an African American singer, songwriter, and musician who pioneered soul music, and 5) Sugar Ray Robinson (1921-1989) who was an American professional boxer from Detroit, MI.

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Browse Robinson family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Newby, co. York, bart., extinct 1689; descended from William Robinson, an ancient Hamburgh merchant; Metcalf Robinson, Esq., of Newby, was created a bart. 1660, d. s. p., when his estates devolved on his nephew, William Robinson, ancestor of the Marquess of Ripon). Vert a chev. betw three bucks standing at gaze or.
2) (Earl of Ripon; Frederick John Robinson, second son of Thomas, second Lord Grantham, and brother of Thomas Philip, Earl de Grey, was created Earl of Ripon 1833; his lordship’s son and successor was created Marquess of Ripon 1871). Vert a chev. betw. three bucks at gaze or. Crest—Out of a coronet composed of fleurs-de-lis a buck at gaze or. Supporters—On either side a wivern or, gorged with a collar barry of three, the middle ar. the othera az. Motto—Foi est tout.
3) (Marquess and Earl of Ripon, created 1871). Same Arms. Crest—Out of a coronet composed of fleurs-de-lis or, a mount vert, thereon a stag at gaze of the first. Supporters—On either side a greyhound reguard. sa. Motto—Qualis ab incepto.
4) (Rokeby, co. York). Vert a chev. betw. three roebucks trippant or. Crest—A roebuck, as in the arms. Motto—Virtute non verbis.
5) (Rokeby Park, co. York, bart., extinct 1794; represented by Lord Rokeby). Vert on a chev. or, betw. three bucks trippant of the last pellettée as many cinquefoils gu. Crest—A buck trippant or, pellettée.
6) (Baron Rokeby, created 1777; the fourth lord assumed the surname of Montagu 1776. See Montagu, Baron Rokeby). Vert on a chev. betw. three roebucks trippant or, as many quatrefoils gu. Crest—A roebuck trippant or. Supporters—On either side a buck ppr. ducally gorged and chained or, charged on the shoulder with a quatrefoil. Motto—Sola in Deo salus.
7) (Cranford, co. Northampton, and Stretton Hall, co. Leicester, bart.). Vert a buck trippant within an orle of trefoils slipped or; augmentation granted in 1633: quarterly, crenellée gu. and or, in the first quarter upon a tower ar. a lion of England pass, guard or. Crest—A buck trippant or, collared and lined yert, the collar charged with three trefoils slipped or.
8) (Batt’s House, co. Somerset, bart.). Per fess embattled az. and gu. two chev. betw. three bucks trippant ar. attired and hoofed of the third. Crest—A buck trippant in front of park pales ppr. Motto—Spes mea in futuro est.
9) (Beverley House, Toronto, Upper Canada, bart.). Per chev. vert and az. on a chev. nebulée betw. three stags trippant or, a unicorn’s head couped betw. two cinquefoils of the first. Crest—A stag trippant or semée of lozenges az. and resting the dexter forefoot on a millrind sa. Motto—Propere et providè.
10) (Rokeby Hall, co Louth, bart.). (co. Suffolk). Vert on a chev. or, betw. three bucks trippant of the last and pellettée, as many quatrefoils gu. Crest—A buck, as in the arms. Motto—Sola in Deo salus.
11) (Reading, co. Berks; Rev. William Robinson, D.D., Prebendary of Westminster, and Rector of Long Whatton, co. Leicester, Visit. Leicester, 1619; son of John Robinson, Esq., of Reading, and grandson of William Robinson, descended from the North). Vert on a chev. betw. three stags statant or, as many trefoils slipped gu. a crescent for diff.
12) (London, Chief Waiter of the Custom House. Visit. London, 1568). Vert on a chev. betw. three stags atatant or, as many trefoils gu. Crest—A stag statant or, pellettée.
13) (Sithney, co. Cornwall; Thomas Robinson, Esq., of Sithney, Visit. Cornwall, 1620, son of William Robinson, of same place, third son of William Robinson, of Worcester). Per pale ar. and gu. a bend engr. sa.
14) (Helstones, co. Cornwall). Per pale ar. and gu. a bend engr. sa.
15) (Moore Place, co. Bucks; granted 25 Oct. 1731). Ar. on a chev. embattled and counter-embattled az. betw. three stags ppr. a salmon naiant of the field. Crest—On a mural coronet chequy ar. and az. a stag’s head cabossed ppr. Motto—Vincam malum bono.
16) (co. Chester). Vert a fret erm. on a chief or, three escallops of the second.
17) (Trethevas, co. Cornwall). Vert a chev. betw. three bucks trippant or. Crest—A buck's head erased.
18) (Nansloe, co. Cornwall). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, vert on a chev. betw. three bucks trippant or, as many crosses pattee az., for Robinson; 2nd and 3rd, Vyvyan, of Trelowarren [which see]. Crest—A buck's head az. erased erm. attired and charged with three lozenges conjoined in fesse or. Motto—Loyal au mort.
19) (Nicholas Robinson, Bishop of Bangor, 1566-85). Az. a chev. betw. three sheafs of arrows, points down ar.
20) (John Robinson, Bishop of Bristol, 1710-13, and of London, 1714-23). Vert on a chev. betw. three bucks trippant or, as many trefoils gu., from a window at Bristol; another, from a window at Fulham, London, Or, on a chev. vert betw. three bucks trippant ppr. as many cinquefoils of the field.
21) (Henry Robinson, Provost of Queen’s College, Oxford, and Bishop of Carlisle, 1598-1616). Az. a flying fish in bend ar. on a chief of the second three roses gu., from his portrait in Queen's Coll.; another, from Cole’s MS., British Museum, Vert a flying fish in bend ar. on a chief of the second a rose gu. betw. two torteaux.
22) (Hendon Lodge, co. Durham). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, vert on a chev. ar. betw. three bucks trippant or, as many cinquefoils gu., for Robinson; 2nd and 3rd, ar. on a bend sa. betw. three pellets as many swans of the first, for Clark. Crest—A stag trippant or.
23) (Herrington, co. Durham; descended from William Robinson, living 1502). Vert a chev. betw. two cinquefoils pierced in chief trippant in base or. Crest—A stag trippant or.
24) (Silksworth Hall, co. Durham). (co. Middlesex, and Herrington and Sunderland, co. Durham). Vert guttee d’eau on a chev. betw. three bucks trippant or, as many cinquefoils gu. Crest—A buck or, supporting with the dexter foreleg an escutcheon quarterly gu. and gold, in the 1st quarter a cross flory ar. Motto—Post nubila Phoebus.
25) Vert on a chev. betw. three goats pass, or, as many lozenges gu. Crest—Out of a mural coronet per pale gu. and or, a demi stag per pale of the last and first, the horns counterchanged.
26) (Sir Christopher Robinson, Knt., King’s Advo¬ate, of Bedford Square, London). Vert a chev. or, betw. three bucks trippant ppr. Crest—A buck statant ppr.
27) (Hill Redware, co. Stafford). Vert on a chev. betw. three bucks trippant or, as many cinquefoils gu. Crest—A buck trippant or.
28) (co. Stafford). Per bend wavy or and gu. two escallop shells counterchanged.
29) (Haveringate Bower, co. Essex). Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three stags trippant ppr. Crest—A stag trippant, as in the arms.
30) (Aigburth, co. Lancaster). Vert on a chev. betw. three stags at gaze or, each charged on the shoulder with a martlet sa. as many gates gu. Crest—On a crown vallary a stag at gaze or, supporting with the dexter forefoot an escutcheon per saltire purp. and of the last, charged with a saltire erm. Motto—Virtute non verbis.
31) (Kingston-upon-Hull, co. York; an ancient family of that town; the heiress, Anne Reynolds, only child of Pickering Robinson, Esq., of Rawcliffe, m. in 1774, John Rogers, of Yarlington, co. Somerset, High Sheriff of the co. 1804). Vert a chev. betw. three bucks trippant or.
32) (William Robinson, LL.D., of Tottenham). Per pale or and vert on a chev. betw. three stags trippant as many trefoils all counterchanged. Crest—A stag per pale or and vert resting the forepaw on an escutcheon vert, charged with a trefoil gold. Motto—Virtus pretiosior auro.
33) (granted to James Robinson, Esq., of Sunderland). Vert a chev. erminois betw. two cinquefoils pierced in chief and a stag trippant in base or, a border engr. of the last. Crest—A mount vert, thereon a stag reguard. or, holding in the mouth a cross calvary in bend sinister gu. the dexter forepaw resting on a cinquefoil pierced, as in the arms.
34) (Boston, co. Lincoln). Vert on a cher. betw. three bucks trippant or, as many suns gu. Crest—A buck pass. sa. bezantée.
35) (London). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three bucks trippant ppr. on a chief az. a sword erect of the first, hilt or, betw. two double keys endorsed and linked of the third.
36) (London, and Drayton Bassett, co. Stafford). Per pale or and az. a cross patonce counterchanged, a chief quarterly of the first and second, in the dexter chief and sinister base points two lions pass. guard. az. in the sinister chief and dexter base three bezants. Crest—A goldfinch ppr. standing on the sun in splendour or.
37) (London, and co. York, 1634). Or, on a chev. gu. betw. three stags trippant vert as many cinqufefoils of the first. Crest—A stag trippant vert, attired or, bezantée.
38) (Cransley, co. Northampton, and co. Northumberland, 1611). Vert on a chev. betw. three bucks or, as many lozenges gu. Crest—Out of a mural coronet chequy ar. and gu. a demi buck or, attired ppr.
39) (Bath, co. Somerset; granted 1772, to William Robinson, Esq.). Vert on a chev. betw. three bucks trippant or, a wreath of laurel betw. two cinquefoils gu. Crest—On a mural coronet gu. a buck at gaze or.
40) (Kentwell Hall, co. Suffolk, bart., extinct 1743; Sir Thomas Robinson, Knt., Prothonotary of the Common Pleas, was created a bart. 1682; the third bart. d. s. p.). Vert on a chev. betw. three bucks trippant or, as many cinquefoils gu. Crest—A buck trippant or.
41) (Southwold, co. Suffolk). Same Arms, the cinquefoils slipped. Crest—A stag’s head erased or.
42) (certified May, 1779, to Capt. John Robinson). Vert on a chev. betw. three bucks trippant or, each charged on the side with an erm. spot sa. as many cinquefoils gu. Crest—A stag trippant or, charged on the side with an erm. spot sa.
43) (Kirby Frith, co. Leicester). Vert a chev engr. ar. betw. two stags statant at gaze or, semée of torteaux in chief and a stirrup leather of the third in base. Crest—A mount vert, thereon a stag statant at gaze or, semée of tor- tcaux, attired gu. betw. the attires an estoile gold, the dexter foot resting on a stirrup iron sa.
44) Vert on a chev. betw. three bucks trippant or, as many cinquefoils ar. Crest—A buck trippant or.
45) Vert a chev. betw. three bucks or. Crest—On a ducal coronet or, a mount vert, thereon a buck of the first.
46) Or, three bars wavy az. in chief four fleurs-de-lis sa. on a canton of the field a bend gu. charged with a crescent ar.; another,
47) Vert a fret or, on a chief of the second three escallops erm.
48) Vert a chev. betw. two cinquefoils in chief and a buck pass, in base all or.
49) Az. a flying fish in bend ar. on a chief of the last three roses gu. seeded or, barbed vert.
50) (Frederick Robinson, M.D., Scots Fusilier Guards). Vert on a chev. erm. betw. two stags trippant ar. two swords in saltire ppr. betw. as many cinquefoils of the field. Crest—Upon a mount vert amid fern ppr. a stag trippant or, guttée vert.
51) (Dullingham, co. Cambridge, and Denston Hall, co. Suffolk; exemplified to Christopher William Pigott, Esq., on his assuming by royal licence, 1857, the surname of Robinson). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, vert on a chev. betw. three stags Statant or, as many trefoils gu., for Robinson; 2nd and 3rd, az. a fret ar. on a chief dancettée of the last three leopards’ faces gu., for Jeaffreson. Crests—1st, Robinson: A stag statant or, pellety attired ar.; 2nd, Jeaffreson : A talbot's head erased ar. eared gu.
52) (Griqualand West, South Africa, and of London; granted to Joseph Benjamin Robinson). Vert three bezants chevronwise betw. two chevronels, the whole betw. three demi stags couped or. Crest—A demi stag or, charged with two chevronels vert, supporting with the dexter leg a flagstaff in bend sinister ppr. therefrom a banner vert charged with a bezant.
53) (Reg. Ulster's Office to George and William Robinson, appointed Prothonotaries to the Court of Common Pleas in Ireland by patent, 14 March, 1605). Barry of six gu. and or, a lion ramp. sa. crowned of the second. Crest—A boar’s head fessways or, couped gu. thrust through the jaw with a spear, point upwards ar.
54) (granted by Carney, Ulster, temp. William III., to William Robinson, Paymaster-General of the Forces in Ireland, who served in several offices of trust under Charles II. and William III.; descended from an ancient family in co. York). Vert a chev. erm. betw. three stags trippant or, on a canton ar. a castle gu. Crest—A stag's head erased or.
55) (Provost of Banff, 1785). Gu. on a chev. engr. betw. three wolves’ heads erased ar. a cinquefoil az. Crest—A talbot’s head and neck ar. Motto—Intemerata fides.
56) (John Charles Robinson, Esq., Swanage, co. Dorset, and Portinan Square, London). Vert on a chev. or, betw. three stags trippant reguard. of the last as many crosses bottonnee fitchee of the first. Crest—A stag ppr. holding in the mouth three cinquefoils slipped vert, and resting the dexter forefoot on a chaplet of roses also ppr.

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