Savage Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Savage Family Coat of Arms

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Savage Coat of Arms Meaning

Savage Name Origin & History

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Savage Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Savage blazon are the lioncel, unicorn, pheon and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 11A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.The Lioncel, whilst it may sound exotic, is simply a term when there several lions lion in the same shield. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:lion

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The unicorn is an intresting example that is still part of our own mythology today. The unicorn as illustrated on even the most ancient coat of arms is still instantly recognisable to us today, and shares many of the same poses that both lions and horses can be found in. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn. Wade, the 18th century heraldic writer suggested that were adopted as symbols because of “its virtue, courage and strength”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 17Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 18A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Savage Name

Savage Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Name:

The surname of Savage comes from a nickname which was used in early European times. This surname in particular comes from a time when nicknames were used habitually to describe someone, and it was eventually so used that it became an identifier rather than just a nickname. These nicknames were first used as a description of physical attributes or particularities of a person, such as their moral compass or their dress and attire according to their occupation. The surname of Savage is of an early medieval English origin, deriving from the Middle English and Old French words of “salvage” and “sauvage” which translate to mean “wild,” “uncontrolled” or “out of control.” This surname was recorded in the Doomsday Book of 1086, which encompassed the “Great Survey” of England.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Salvage, Sauvage, Savvage, Saviage, Saviage, Savaage, Savahge, Saavage, Sa-Vage

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Savage was in the Doomsday Book for Herefordshire in the year 1086, which was said to encompass the “Great Survey” of England. One Edric Saluvage was recorded and mentioned in this book in the year 1086, under the rule of King William I, who was also commonly referred to as “William the Conqueror” and ruled from the year 1066 to the year 1087. Other mentions of this surname include various spellings of this surname, and include Robert le Sauuage, who was recorded in Surry in 1198, Ralph le Savage, who was recorded in Suffolk in 1268, and the great Co. Down family of Savage, Savage of the Ards, who were recorded in the Province of Ulster.

Ireland:

In Ireland, the surname of Savage was translated to Gaelic and then turn into “Mac an tSabhasaigh” which caused the English settlers there to become Hibernicized.

William le Sauvage from Kent participated in the Ulster invasion in 1177 and built a castle on the top of hill Ardkeen in the region of Down. Over the centuries, the Savages would become fully intertwined in the Irish landscape and would war with other Irish clans often.

United States of America:

During the Great Migration, also known as the European Migration, which began in the 1600’s, English settlers became disgruntled with their leadership and the way that their homeland was being run. Oftentimes during this time period, they set off in search of a better life, and settled on the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as the Colonies or the New World. This New World promised religious freedom, better conditions for living, and the possibility to acquire land. Among these settlers who migrated to the New World were people with the surname of Savage. The first person recorded to set foot on American soil with the surname of Savage was one Thomas Savage, who was just twenty-seven years of age when he embarked on the journey to New England, from London, on the ship named the “Planter” in the 1635 in the month of April. It is possible that people with the surname of Savage were destined to arrive in America sooner, but did not make the journey due to poor living conditions on the transport ships that were bringing them here. During this time, many people died from starvation and disease, or came to the new country with these ailments. Those with the surname of Savage who did make it to America safely lived in the states of Maine, New York, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, California, Washington, Illinois, Virginia, Michigan, and the state of North Carolina.

Savage Today:

United States 57,700

England 18,004

Nigeria 11,004

Canada 6,596

Australia 6,100

Sierra Leone 4,681

South Africa 3,908

Northern Ireland 1,955

New Zealand 1,811

Ireland 1,299

Notable People:

Claudia Von Savage, who is an American Republican politician, and a Delegate to the Republican National Convention from New Jersey in the year 2004

Augustus Alexander “Gus” Savage (1925-2015) who was an American politician, and a Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Illinois from the year of 1981 to the year 1993

Henry Wilson Savage (1859-1927) who was an American theatrical manager

John Savage (born in 1949) who was born with the name John Youngs, and is an American Genie Award nominated actor best known for his roles in The Deer Hunter in the year 1978, Hair in the year 1979, and The Godfather: Part III in the year 1990

Arthur William Savage (1857-1938) who was an American businessman, inventor, and explorer, the founder of Savage Arms in 1894, and was best known for producing the Savage model 99

Adam Whitney Savage (born in 1967) who is an American industrial design and special effects designer and fabricator and a two-time Primetime Emmy Award nominee

Jess W. Savage who was an American politician, and the Mayor of Albany Oregon in the year 1949

Savage Family Gift Ideas

Browse Savage family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (West Bergholt and Copsford, co. Essex, 1611). Chequy or and gu. a lion ramp. erm. a canton az. Crest—Two lions’ gambs erased erm. supporting a pillar gobony or and gu. capital and base of the second.
2) (Baron Abinger). Motto—Suis stat viribus. Chequy or and gu. a lion ramp. erm. on a canton az. a castle triple-towered ar. Crest—A Tuscan column chequy or and gu. supported on either side by a lion’s gamb ermines erased gu. Supporters—Two angels vested ar. tunics az. wings or, in the exterior hand of each a sword in bend ppr. pommel and hilt gold.
1) (Rock Savage and Clifton, co. Chester). Motto—Ware the horn. This was discarded for the ancient bearing temp. Henry VIII. Ar. six lioncels ramp. sa. N.B.—This is the ancient coat of the Savages. Sir John Savage. Knt., having inherited Clifton through his mother, Margaret, dau. and heir of Sir Thomas Daniers, obtained, 3 Henry V., a grant of the arms of that family, viz., Ar. four fusils in pale sa. Crest—A unicorn’s head erased ar.
2) (Earl Rivers, extinct 1728; descended from John Savage, Esq., of Clifton, co. Chester, sprung from Savage, of Steinesbie, co. Derby, m. temp. Edward III., Margaret, dau. and heir of Sir Thomas Daniers, Knt., of Bradley, co. Chester, with whom he obtained the manor of Clifton; eighth in descent from him was Sir John Savage, created a bart. 1611, whose son, Sir Thomas Savage, second bart., was created Viscount Savage 1626. lie m. Elizabeth D’Arcy, dau. of Thomas, third Lord D’Arcy, of Chiche, who was created, 1626, Viscount Colchester and Earl Rivers, with special remainder to his son-in-law, Sir Thomas Savage). Motto—A te pro te. Ar. six lions ramp. three, two, and one sa. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a lion's gamb erect sa. Supporters—Dexter, a falcon or, belled of the last; sinister, a unicorn ar.
3) (Brodway, co. Worcester, Visit. 1600; and Tidbury co. Gloucester, Visit. 1623). Same Arms. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a lion’s gamb erect sa.
4) (co. Chester, Visit. 1600; co. Gloucester, Visit. 1620; Tidminton and Powick, co. Worcester, Visit. 1634). Same Arms. Crest—A unicorn’s head erased ar.
5) (Elmley Lovet, co. Worcester, and Highgate, co. Middlesex). Same Arms, a crescent for diff. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a lion's gamb erect sa. charged with a crescent or.
6) (Bloxworth, co. Dorset). Same Arms, a fleur-de-lis gu. for diff. Crest—A lion’s gamb erect sa. in a ducal coronet or.
7) (Clavering-Savage, Elmley Castle, co. Worcester). Same Arms, on a canton az. a fleur-de-lis of the field. Cresl —A unicorn's head erased per fess ar. and gu. armed and crined or, in the mouth a fleur-de-lis az.
8) (Midsomer Norton, co. Somerset). Ar. on a pile az. six lions ramp. three, two, and one or. Crest—A unicorn’s head couped at the neck per fess wavy az. and sa. three bendlets ar. armed or, in the mouth a sprig of oak fructed ppr.
9) (Tatchbroke and Barford. co. Warwick; Robert Savage, a.d. 1574, son of Thomas Savage, of Barford, and grandson of William Savage, of Tatchbroke). (Clanfield, co. Oxford; Walter Savage, Visit. Oxon, 1574, second son of Thomas Savage, of Barford, co. Warwick, m. Anne, dau. of Michael Fox, of Chacombe, co. Northants). Ar. on a fess az. betw. three pheons sa. as many roses or.
10) (Castleton, co. Derby). Ar. a pale fusily sa. a crescent for diff. Crest—A unicorn’s head ar. erased gu.
11) (Hart Street, City of London). Ar. on a fess az. betw. two pheons sa. three roses or. Crest—Two arms embowed in armour ppr. issuing out of an Eastern crown or, supporting a pheon sa.
12) (co. Chester, 6 Henry VII.). Ar. two cotises dancettee sa. (another has the tinctures reversed).
13) (cos. Essex and Oxford). Ar. on a fess az. betw. two pheons of the second three roses or.
14) (co. Kent). Erm. on a chief az. three lions ramp. ar.
15) (London). Ar. on a fess az. betw. two pheons sa. three roses or.
16) (co. Sussex). Az. a chev. betw. three leopards’ faces ar.
17) (Portaferry, co. Down; an ancient Norman family established in Ireland under Sir John de Courcy, a.d. 1177. Andrew Savage, Esq., of Portaferry, representative of this family, on inheriting the fortune of his maternal grand-uncle, assumed the surname and arms of Nugent, by royal licence, in 1812). Motto—Fortia atque fidelis. (Knockadoo, co. Sligo; a branch of Savage, of Portaferry; descended from Hugh Savage, Esq., of the city of Dublin, third son of John Savage, Esq., of Ballyvarley, co. Devon, great-grandson of Rowland Savage, Esq., of the Little Ards, who d. at Portaferry in 1552. The Rev. Robert Savage, of Knockadoo, and Lukesland Home, co. Devon, d. 1841, leaving his sisters his co-heirs). (Ballymadun, co. Dublin; descended through the Knockadoo branch from Savage, of Portaferry; Francis Savage, Esq., of Ballymadun, was eldest son of Rev. Chbistopheb Kingsborocgh Savage, who was eldest son of Francis Savage, Esq., of Knockadoo). Motto—Fortis atque fidelis. Ar. six lions ramp. sa. langued gu. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a lion's gamb erect sa.
18) (Ardquin Castle, co. Down, and Lisanoure Castle, co. Antrim; a family coeval with that of Portaferry; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1665; presumed by some authorities to to have branched off at a very early period from that ancient house). Motto—Fortis atque fidelis. Same Arms, an annulet az. for diff. Crest—On waves of the sea a mermaid ppr.
19) (Sir Thomas Savage, knighted 31 Oct. 1601, by Charles, Lord Mountjoy, Lord Deputy of Ireland). Ar. six lions ramp. three, two, and one, a label of three points gu.
20) (Valentine Savage, Esq., of the city of Dublin, Deputy Clerk of the Crown temp. Charles II., m. Mary, dau. of Thomas Houghton, Esq., of Ballyanne, co. Wexford; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1670). (Reban, co. Kildare; Sir Arthur Savage, Knt., a Privy Councillor in Ireland temp. James I. and Charles I.; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1626, of his dau. Elizabeth, wife of Sir James Carrol, Mayor of Dublin). Ar. six lions ramp. three, two, and one sa.
21) (Kilcreen, co. Kilkenny; exemplified to Clayton Bayly, Esq., of Kilcreen, on his assuming, by royal licence, 1837, the surname and arms of Savage in lieu of Bayly, in compliance with the will of his uncle, Francis Savage, Esq., of Hollymount, co. Down). Motto—Fortia atque fidelis. Ar. six lioncels ramp, three, two, and one sa. Crest—Out of waves a mermaid all ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
11. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:lion
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111