Southall Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Southall Family Coat of Arms

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Southall Coat of Arms Meaning

Southall Name Origin & History

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Southall Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Southall blazon are the cinquefoil, rock and martlet. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, gules and argent .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

The rock, says Guillim in his “Display of Heraldry” signifies “safety, refuge and protection” and we can clearly understand why. 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P225 It occurs more often in Scottish arms than in English (that nation having a much rockier landscape) and is almost always drawn in natural colours. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Rock

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Southall Name

Southall Origin:

England

Origins of Southall:

This surname is from old English in origin. It is regional from any of the different areas named as Southall or South Hall. These acquire before 7th-century old English words “suth” which means south, and “halh,” which means a hall or castle, or can mention a region within a dale or clear land. Without knowing the particular atmosphere of every region, it is not possible to say with the accurate idea. It said that the old hamlet of Southall in Middlesex, now a part of Greater London, was first listed as Sudhalle in the pipe rolls of the year 1212, but other Southall’s in the divisions of Worcestershire and Shropshire are known to have introduced some name heritors. The surname first listed in the second part of the 13th century. Other previous examples derived from remaining parish records of the very early times consist those of Nycholas Sowthall and Jone Fuller who married at St. Olave’s, Old Jewry, in the city of London in February 1539, while in April 1595, John Southall married Rachell Harvie at Aylesbeare, in Devonshire. The name also well listed in the Birmingham region of Warwickshire, and example being that of John, the son of Thomas Southall, who named at St. Martin’s parish in July 1749.

Variations:

More common variations are: Southhall, Southalla, Southwall, Souuthall, Southal, Suthall, Southll, Southell, Southwal, Southoll.

England:

The origins of the surname Southall found in Suffolk where people held a family seat as kings of the castle. After the war of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having overcome to King Harold, given most of Britain to his different champions. It was not unusual to find a champion, or a priest, with 60 or more championships stretched all over the country.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Nicholas de Suthalle, dated about 1273, in the “Hundred Rolls of Norfolk.” It was during the time of King Edward 1st, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Southall had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Southall settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Southall who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Martha Southall landed in Virginia in the year 1713. William Southall arrived in Virginia in 1714.

The following century saw much more Southall surnames come. Some of the people with the name Southall who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Solomon Southall at the age of 45, landed in New York in the year 1812.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Southall who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Peter Southall who was an English prisoner from Warwick, who shifted aboard the ship “ Asia” in October 1824, coming in New South Wales, Australia. John Southall who was an English prisoner from Warwick, who shifted aboard the ship “ Albion” in October 1826, coming in New South Wales, Australia.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Southall who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Alfred Southall arrived in Auckland, New-Zealand aboard the ship “ Bombay” in the year 1863.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Southall: United States 3,754; England 3,745; Australia 553; Canada 243; South Africa 183; Scotland 98; Wales 384; Germany 134; New-Zealand 178; Spain 43.

Notable People:

Leslie Nicholas “Nicky” Southall was born in January in the year 1972. He is an English professional football player who is a senior officer at National League South side Maidstone United.

Neville Southall MBE was born in September 1958. He is an old Welsh international football player.

Brian Michael Southall was born February in the year 1982 in Detroit, Michigan. He is an American guitar player, drummer, keyboardist, vocalist, director, and band manager.

Patricia “Pat” Annette Smith (née Southall), was born in 1971. He is an American inventor.

Southall Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Quarterly, gu. and or, on a bend ar. a martlet betw. two cinquefoils of the first. Crest—A rock sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P225
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Rock
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79