Stedman Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Stedman Family Coat of Arms

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Stedman Coat of Arms Meaning

Stedman Name Origin & History

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Stedman Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Stedman blazon are the cross crosslet, virign and chequy. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and gules .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, being symetrical both vertically and horizontally and having an additional cross bar on each arm. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

The middle ages was a deeply religious time, and since the bulk of heraldry was developed in countries that were almost entirely Christian it is no surprise that religious and church symbology was widely adopted for use in coats of arms. The XXXX Is a typical such usage. As well the adoption of religious imagery for the nobility, the Church itself has made extensive use of arms, such Ecclesiastical Heraldry 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P600 is a major subject in its own right, somewhat less “martial” than that of the nobility and with its own terms and special meanings. The Virgin Mary is used in this context, appearing in the arms of certain religious adminstrative regions, known as “Sees” in England, and, somewhat more frequently in European arms.

Chequy (a word with a surprising number of different spellings!) is what is known as a treatment, a repeating pattern usually used to fill the whole background of the shield with a series of alternately coloured squares 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy. These squares are usually quite small (there should be at least 20 in total), giving the appearance of a chess board, but any combination of colours may be used. It can also be used as a patterning on some of the larger ordinaries, such as the pale and fess, in which case there are three rows of squares. Wade, an authority on heraldic meaning groups chequy with all those heraldic features that are composed of squares and believes that they represent “Constancy”, but also quotes another author Morgan, who says that they can also be associated with “wisdom…verity, probity…and equity”, and offers in evidence the existence of the common English saying that an honest man is a ”Square Dealer” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Stedman Name

Stedman Origin:

England, Scotland

Origin of Stedman:

It is a fascinating and unique surname. It has two specific possible origins. Both origins are professional. The first origin of the name acquires from the word “stoda or steda,” which means a horse, also “man,” which means an outstanding man, which means the man who is the guard of the horse. The second origin of the surname is that its first component is associated with the Ancient English “stede,” if this word converted then we will get its meaning in the form of land or property and thus a person maybe worked as a manager and supervisor. The surname was first listed in the second half of the 13th Century, at the same time during the previous documentation included as John le Stedman in the Warrant of Court for the City of London, which was dated 1306, and Robertus Stud hyrd in the Poll Tax Roll of Yorkshire in 1379. In the new era, the name has a different form of spellings consisting of Steadman, Stedman, Steedman, Stedmond and Studman.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Steadman, Steedman, Stiedman, Stedmann, Steidman, Steudman, Stuedman, Steddman, Stedmian, Stedaman.

England:

The name Stedman first originated in Gloucestershire where they held a family seat from very ancient times, where they were kings of Castle.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard Stedeman, which was dated 1273, in the Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire. It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272 – 1207. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Stedman settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Stedman who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Nathaniel Stedman, Elizabeth and Isaac Stedman; all these people settled in Boston Massachusetts in the same year in 1635. Elizabeth Stedman at the age of 26, landed in in America in 1635. Isaac Stedman, who arrived in Massachusetts in 1635 and Isack Stedman at the age 1 landed in New England in 1635.

Some of the people with the name Stedman who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Alexander Stedman and Charles Stedman both arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the same year 1746.

Some of the people with the name Stedman who settled in the United States in the 19th century included F a P Stedman landed in San Francisco, California in 1849. D P Stedman, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Stedman who settled in the Canada in the 19th century included Nathaniel Stedman and William Stedman both arrived in Canada in the same year in 1816. John Stedman landed in Canada in 1832.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Stedman who settled in the Australia in the 19th century included James Stedman, an English prisoner from Surrey aboard the “Ann” in August 1809, settling in New South Wales, Australia.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Stedman who settled in the New Zealand in the 20th century included Herbert Stedman at the age of 18, arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “S. S. Waimana” in 1926.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Stedman: United States 5,733; England 2,086; Wales 226; Australia 979; Scotland 184; Canada 389; South Africa 438; Germany 168; Dominica 112.

Notable People:

Arthur Stedman (1868–1958), was a British builder.

Bert Stedman (born 1956), is an American congressman from Alaska.

Charles Stedman (1753–1812), was a British Army officer, author, and professor.

Charles Harrison Stedman (1805–1866), was an American creator medical society.

Charles Manly Stedman (1841–1930), was a famous congressman and advocate from North Carolina.

Chris Stedman (born 1987), is an American author and interfaith advocate.

Daniel Stedman was an American film producer.

Edmund Clarence Stedman (1833–1908), was an American poet, judge, and journalist.

Edward Stedman (1842–1925), was a senior British Indian Army manager.

Elizabeth Clementine Stedman (1810–1889), was an American author.

Fred Stedman (1870–1918), was an English cricket player.

Geoffrey Ernest Stedman (born 1943), is a New Zealand chemist.

Ivan Stedman (1895–1979), was an Australian swimmer.

Stedman Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Gloucester). Or, a cross crosslet vert. Crest—A demi virgin ppr. hair dishevelled, holding in the dexter hand a cross crosslet vert.
2) (Dolgoer, co. Brecknock). Chequy or and gu. a chief erm.
3) (co. Salop). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three boars' heads couped (another, erased) sa. Crest—A peacock’s head betw. two wings, in the beak an adder ppr.
4) Vert a fess ar. betw. two pheons in chief and an anchor in base or. Crest—An anchor ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P600
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100