Steel Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Steel Family Coat of Arms

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Steel Coat of Arms Meaning

Steel Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Steele.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Steel. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Steel Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Steel blazon are the lion’s head, furison and bend. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 The head of the lion also appears alone on many coats of arms, but its use in this form is largely to enable a clear difference from similar arms that use the complete animal, and its significance should be taken to be the same as the lion entire, being a symbol of “deathless courage”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P59

Furison is an ancient word, now fallen out of use, but means fire-iron or fire-steel – the peice of metal struck against a flint to create a spark and ignite a fire. It has been used as play on words for families named STEEL or BLACK. 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P292

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Steel Name

Steele Origin:
England, Scotland

Origins of Name:
The surname of Steele has many possible origins from which it derives. The first of these possible origins is that it may derive from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “style” which can be translated to mean “steel.” This Old English word was often used as an occupational name for someone who was a foundry worker, or one who worked with steel. The next possible origin for this surname of Steele comes from a nickname for someone who was so firm that they might be referred to as obstinate, or someone who was able to absorb the true rigors that come with life. These people were often said to be “as true as steel” if they were reliable or “as hard as steel.” Another possible origin for this surname of Steele comes from England and Scotland. This origin says that this surname of Steele may be locational, as there are places in both England and Scotland that are called Steel, or Le Stele. These places are located in Ayrshire, Berwickshire, Shropshire, Dumfriesshires, and Northumberland. This name derives from the word “stigol” which is an Old English pre 7th century term. It is defined to mean a “stile or steep ascent.”

Variations:
More common variations are: Steeley, Steelle, Steelee, Sateele, Steelye, Steehle, Steeleh, Stteele, Styeele, Stieele, Steel, Stelle, Stell, Steill

England:
The first known recorded spelling of the Steele surname was in the country of England during the year of 1203. One person, by the name of Robert Stel, was mentioned and recorded in the Pipe Rolls of Oxfordshire. This document was ordered and decreed under the reign of one King John. King John was known as and commonly referred to as the “Lackland” throughout the ages of history, and ruled from the year of 1199 to the year 1216. Those who bear the surname of Steele can be found in the counties of Cheshire, Yorkshire, Lancashire, Cumberland, Durham, Northumberland, and Staffordshire.

Scotland:
In Scotland, the surname of Steele is said to be locational, and there are various spellings of the surname in this country. In the country of Scotland, there are many people who carry the surname of Steele. These people are said to be in high concentrations primarily in the counties and areas of Ayrshire and Lanarkshire.

United States of America:
During the European Migration, many settlers fled from their home country in search of a new life. The United States, which at that time in history was referred to as the New World or the Colonies, was often the destination most sought after during this time of disgruntled leadership. The United States of America promised freedoms that were never afforded to these European citizens ever before. The first person to bear the surname of Steele was the Steele family. James Steele, Mary Steele, Rachel Steele, and Joan Steele all arrived in the city of Nantucket, Massachusetts in the year of 1631. George Steele may have also arrived in the state of Massachusetts in the year 1631, but settled in the city of Cambridge. Henry Steele also arrived in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the year 1632. Those who bear this surname of Steele can be found in the states of California, Washington, Missouri, Indiana, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Illinois and Michigan.

Steele Today:
United States 97,542
England 15,810
Canada 9,648
Australia 7,462
South Africa 4,785
Scotland 2,980
New Zealand 1,773
Jamaica 1,428
Northern Ireland 1,312
Wales 892

Notable People:
William Mitchell “Bill” Steele (1885-1949) who was an American MLB pitcher who played from the year 1910 through the year 1914 from America

William O. Steele (1917-1979) who was an author, most notably recognized for his book The Perilous Road, which was the recipient of the Newbery Medal in the year 1959, and was from America

William Randolph Steele (1842-1901) who was a Delegate from the Territory of Wyoming from the year 1873 to the year 1877, who was a politician from America

Fletcher Steele (1859-1971) who was a landscape architect from America

Allen Mulherin Steele Jr. (born in 1958) who was an award-winning author in the genre of science fiction who was from America

Michael Stephen Steel (born in 1958) who was the former chairman of the Republican National Committee, and was the first African American to hold this position, was also the Lieutenant Governor of the State of Maryland from the year 2003 to the year 2007

Jason Sean Steele (born in 1990) who is a goalkeeper from England

Steel Family Gift Ideas

Browse Steel family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Derwent Bank, co. Cumberland). Ar. a bend chequy ea. and erm. betw. two lions’ beads erased gu. on a chief az. three billets or. Crest—A lion’s head erased gu.
2) (Scotland, 16th century). Az. three furisons or.
3) (Carfin, co. Lanark, 1866). Motto—Steel to the back. Or, three furisons sa. Crest—A dexter arm in bend, the hand grasping bend einisterways a broadsword ppr.
4) Ar. a bend chequy sa. and erm. betw. two lions’ heads erased gu. a chief az. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi ostrich, wings endorsed gu.
5) Ar. a bend chequy erm. and sa. betw. two lions’ heads erased gu. on a chief az. three billets or. Crest—A lion’s head erased gu.
6) (Lieut.-Gen. Sir Thomas Montagu Steele, K.C.B.). Erm. a sword bendwise ppr. within two bendlets engr. the whole betw. as many lions’ beads erased gu. on a chief of the last a mural crown betw. two billets or. Crest—In front of two swords in saltire ppr. a lion’s head erased quarterly ar. and gu. charged with four billets counterchanged.
7) (Hampstead, co. Dublin, bart.). Mottoes—In bello invictus, in amore probus; and, Absque labore nihil. Ar. a bend counter-componee sa. and or, betw. two lions' beads erased gu. on a chief az. three billets of the third. Crest—A demi eagle displ. holding in the beak a snake all ppr.
8) (Rathbride, co. Kildare; descended from Lawrence Steele, Clerk in the House of Commons, Ireland, 1662-97, who claimed descent from Steele, of Giddy Hall, near Sandbach, co. Chester. He purchased from the Trustees for Forfeited Estates, 1702, Rathbride, co. Kildare, which bad been forfeited by Francis Leigh for his adhesion to James II.). Ar. a bend compony counter-compony sa. and of the first betw. two lions’ heads erased gu. on a chief per pale az. and of the third two billets of the field. Crest—A demi eagle, wings elevated, holding a serpent in tbe beak all ppr. and charged on each wing with a billet, as in the arms. Motlo —Semper fidelis.
9) (Dublin; confirmed to William Edward Steele, Esq., M.D., Assistant-Secratary, Royal Dublin Society; descended from Steele, of Rathbride). Motto—Semper fidelis. Or, a bend compony counter-compony sa. and ar. betw. two lions’ heads erased gu. on a chief per pale az. and of the fourth two billets of the field. Crest—A demi eagle, wings elevated, holding a serpent in the beak all ppr. and charged on each wing with a billet, as in the arms.
10) (Scotland). Motto—Prudentia et animis. Ar. a bend chequy sa. and erm. betw. two lions’ heads erased gu. on a chief az. two billets or. Crest—A lion’s head erased gu.
11) Ar. a bend chequy sa. and erm. betw. two lions’ heads erased gu. a chief az. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi ostrich, wings endorsed gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P59
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P292
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49