Steven Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Steven Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Steven Coat of Arms Meaning

Steven Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Steven. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

steven coat of arms

Steven Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Steven blazon are the hand, crescent, mullet and chevron. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and argent.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The hand, unless we are told otherwise is a dexter (right) hand shown palm outwards and fingers upwards.6A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305. It demonstrates faith, sincerity and justice, and in the form of two right hands clasped can mean union or alliance7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92. There is a special form called the “Hand of Ulster” which is a sinister hand gules on an argent background (a left hand, red upon white). Originally the Badge of Ulster, the Province of Northern Ireland, it has come to be used as an addition to existing arms, in an escutcheon (small shield) or canton (small square) to indicate that the holder is also a Baronet.8Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Steven Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Steven Name

Steven Origin:

England, Greek

Origins of Steven:

It is an original name of Greek origin, from the participant name “Stephanas,” itself from “stephanos,” which means crown or top on the head. The name appeared in England before the Norman invasion of 1066, but only as a priest’s name in its learned (Latin) form of “Stefanus,” which was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086. After the invasion, the name became famous in England, and all over the Christendom in the Middle Ages, slightly because of the popularity of St. Stephen, the first Christian saint, who was pushed to death at Jerusalem three years after the death of Christ. The particular name also produced by King Stephen of England, famous as “Count of Blois,” who ruled from 1135 – 1154. There are many different spelling forms of the new surname produced from the particular name; these contain as Stephen, Steffan (a Welsh variant), Steven and Stiven, with the pet name forms as Stephens, Steffens, and Stevens. The naming of Benjamen Stephen listed at St. Bride’s, Fleet Street, London, in March 1661. A Royal symbol gave to the family of the name from Gloucester is a silver shield, on a blue bend three silver lions’ heads removed, at the peak being out of a gold ducal coronet, a silver dolphin’s head.

Variations:

More common variations are: Steaven, Stieven, Stueven, Stevene, Steeven, Staeven, Steveni, Steveny, Steyven, Stoeven.

England:

The origins of the surname Steven was found in Gloucestershire where people descended from FitzStephen, a Breton fighter who ultimately defeated from Count Stephen of Brittany and with Willliam the invader into England and fought the war of Hastings in 1066. Stephen FitzAirard was the commander of the “Mora,” the ship which introduced William the invader from Normandy, His son Thomas FitzStephen who was commander of the ill-fated white ship, which disappeared Barfleur, Normandy, in November 1120.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert Stephen, dated about 1260, assistance in the “Assize Court Rolls of Cheshire.” It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Steven had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Steven settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Steven who settled in the United States in the 17th century included William Steven arrived in Virginia in 1636. John Steven landed in Maryland in 1648. Richard Steven came to Virginia in 1651. Martha Steven landed in Virginia in 1670.

Some of the people with the surname Steven who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Anne Steven arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1745. James Steven, Sarah Steven, Christian Steven at the age of 23 and Christine Steven, all arrived in North Carolina in the same year 1775. Chrn Steven at the age of 23 landed in New York, NY in 1775.

The following century saw more Steven surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Steven who settled in the United States in the 19th century included William Steven at the age of 32, landed in New York in 1812. David Steven arrived in New York, NY in 1834. Matthias Steven landed in Washington Division, Pennsylvania in 1842. Bern Anton Leopold Steven landed in America in 1849.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Steven who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Joseph Steven at the age of 39 arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship “Phoebe Dunbar.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Steven: United States 6,765; England 2,673; Tanzania 20,953; Nigeria 16,812; Malaysia 3,465; Indonesia 1,995; Rawanda 3,157; Uganda 12,696; Vietnam 3,180; Papua New Guinea 6,725.

Notable People:

Carlo Steven Krakoff (November 1974 – July 2011), well-known as Carl Steven. He was an old American child actor and voice artist. He was a citizen of Glendale, California.

Fisher Stevens was born as Steven Fisher in November in the year 1963. He is an American actor, producer, director, and author. As an actor, he is famous for his portrait of Chuck Fishman on Early Edition.

Steven Family Gift Ideas

Browse Steven family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More steven Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Ar. on a chev. betw. two crescents in chief and a sinister hand in base couped gu. as many mullets of the field.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92
8. Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105