Taylor Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Taylor Family Coat of Arms

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Taylor Coat of Arms Meaning

Taylor Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Taylour, Tayler, Tayleur, Tayloure.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Taylor. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Taylor Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Taylor blazon are the lion passant, escallop, annulet and chief. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Taylor Name

Taylor Origin: England, France

Origins of Name:

The surname of Taylor derives from the Old French word “tailleur” which can be translated to mean “a cutter-out of cloth.” This surname is occupational, meaning that it was given to someone who actually carried out the occupation of being a tailor. As with other occupational surnames, it was first given to the original person who carried out this job, and then was passed on to the son if he also joined the same profession as his father. After this carry over, the surname became hereditary, meaning that it was passed down rather than actually corresponding with the occupation of the name bearer.

Variations:

More common variations are: Tayolor, Taaylor, Tayler, Tailor, Tayleur ,Taylour, Taylore, Taiylor, Tayllor, Taylorr, Tayalor, Tayloor, Ttaylor,

History:

Scotland:

Early recordings of the surname of Taylor can be found in the country of Scotland. One Alexander le Tayllur was named as the valet of Alexander in the year 1276, while in the year 1292, one John le Taillur was in charge of the mill of Selkirk and named as firmar. In the year 1296, Brice le Taillur was named as one of the prisoners from Scotland who was taken in the Dunbar Castle capture. Also in the year 1296, King Edward I, who was known as and commonly referred to throughout the ages as “Longshanks” because of his wars with the Scottish population, invaded Scotland for the first time. King Edward I demanded that the Scottish people honor him.

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Taylor can be found in the country of England, in the late 12th century. One person by the name of Walter Taylur was named in the Canterbury Cathedral records. These records were ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry II, who ruled from they year 1154 to the year 1189. Other mentions of this surname in the country of England include William le Taillur, who was mentioned in the Pipe Rolls of Somerset in the year 1182, while one Roger le Taylur was named in the Hundred Rolls of Lincolnshire in the year 1273.

United States of America:

In the 1600’s, the European citizens became disgruntled with the state of affairs in their countries. Throughout this time period, it was common that European citizens began to seek a better life for them and their families. One of the largest places that these European citizens were moving to was the United States of America, which at that time was more commonly known as The New World, or The Colonies. This New World had many opportunities that European citizens were not able to achieve in their own countries. These opportunities included a promise of better living conditions, the ability to own and cultivate land, and the promise of jobs in the emerging world and economy. These promises appealed greatly to European citizens, and so many of them moved to The Colonies that this movement has become known as The European Migration. The first person to emigrate out of their country and move to The New World with the surname of Taylor was one Achsah Taylor, who settled in Salem, Massachusetts in the year 1630. Seven years later, in the year 1637, Anthony Taylor moved to the state of Virginia. Those who bear the surname of Taylor can be found today throughout the United States of America. The areas with large concentrations of those who carry the Taylor surname are New York, Alabama, Ohio, North Carolina, Georgia, and in the state of Tennessee.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Taylor: United States 787,071; England 174,178; Australia 75,521; Canada 65,648; South Africa 41,112; Nigeria 25,523; Ghana 20,928; Scotland 17,320; Liberia 16,984; Sierra Leone 15,714

Notable People:

Jack Crawford Taylor (1922-2016) who was a billionaire and businessman from the United States of America, who was the founder of the Enterprise Rent-A-Car Company

Arthur Robert Taylor (1935-2015) who was the president of CBS Inc. from the year 1972 to the year 1976

President Zachary Taylor (1784-1850) who served as the 12th President of the United States of America

Gardner Calvin Taylor (1918-2015) who was a preacher from America, and received the Presidential Medal of Freedom

Dallas Woodrow Taylor Jr. (1948-2015) wo was a session drummer from America, who was most notably recognized as the drummer on the self-titled debut album of the band, Crosby, Stills, & Nash in the year 1969

Master Stanley Robert Taylor, who was a 2nd Class Passenger aboard the RMS Lusitania from Dorchester, Massachusetts, who survived the sinking of the vessel in the year 1915

Mrs. Annie Sarah Taylor (died in 1915) who was a 2nd Class Passenger aboard the RMS Lusitania from Dorchester, Massachusetts, who died in the sinking of the vessel in the year 1915

Taylor Family Gift Ideas

Browse Taylor family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (London). Or, on a chev. sa. three annulets ar. in chief two lions pass. of the second. Crest—A unicorn’s head erased ar. armed and maned or, collared sa. thereon three annulets gold.
2) (London). Quarterly, or and sa. a cross flory counterquartered. Crist—A greyhound's head quarterly ar. and sa. collar counterchanged.
3) (London; granted 1592). Az. two bars wavy ar. in chief a lion pass. guard. or. Crest—A demi otter ramp. or.
4) (co. Middlesex). Ar. on a chief sa. three escallops of the field.
5) (Grafton, co. Oxford). Erm. on a chief indented gu. three escallops ar. Crest—A lion's head erased ar. ducally gorged or.
6) (co. Surrey). Per pale az. and or, a chev. betw. three bucks' heads counterchanged.
7) Sa. a lion pass. or, on a canton gu. a pheon of the second, a border engr. erm. Crest—A leopard pass. ar. spotted sa. charged with a pheon or.
8) Erm. on a chief indented sa. three trefoils of the field.
9) Erm. on a chief indented gu. three escallops ar.
10) Az. a chev. betw. three escallops ar.
11) Ar. three bends az. on a chief gu. three cocks of the first.
12) (Buntingsdale, co. Salop; settled at a very early period at Rodington, in the same county;. John Tayleur, Esq., of Rodington, was High Sheriff co. Salop 1691). Erm. on a chief sa. three escallops ar. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a dexter arm in armour holding in the hand a sword all ppr.
13) (Bisley, &c., co. Gloucester; William Tayloe Esq., of Chalford Bottom, was High Sheriff of co. Gloucester 1742). Same Arms as Telow, viz., Vert a sword erect or, betw. two lions ramp. addorsed erm.
14) (Eaton, co. Bedford). Ar. on a pale sa. three lions pass. of the first. Crest—A leopard pass. ppr. resting the dexter foot on a shield of the arms.
15) (Stretchworth and Lidgate, co. Cambridge). (Marridge, co. Devon). Ar. (another, or) a chev. sa. betw. two lions pass. in chief and an annulet in base of the second. Crest—A unicorn’s head erased or, ducally gorged and armed az.
16) (Padgbury, near Congleton. co. Chester). Az. a saltire voided betw. four stags’ heads cabossed or. Crest—A buck’s head cabossed ppr.
17) (co. Cumberland). Sa. a lion pass. ar.
18) (Walton-on-Trent, co. Derby; the last male heir, William Taylor, Esq., was High Sheriff of the county in 1727; his last surviving sister d. in 1773, when Edward W. Disbrowe, Esq., M.P., succeeded as heir at law to the Walton Hall estate). (Lingfield, co. Surrey). Per pale az. and or, a chev. betw. three bucks’ heads all counterchanged, on a chief gu. two hounds meeting ar. collared of the second.
19) (Durant Hall, co. Derby; the heiress m. Sir Charles Skrymsher, Knt., temp. Charles II.). Erm. on a chev. gu. betw. three anchors sa. as many escallops ar.
20) (co. Derby). Erm. on a chev. gu. betw. three anchors sa. as many escallops ar. Crest—A stork resting the dexter foot on an anchor ppr.
21) (Beaconfield, Denbury, and Ogwell, co. Devon; originally from Lyme, co. Dorset; descended from JospehTaylor, R.N., Captain of the flag ship stationed at Plymouth at the time of Queen Anne’s death). Sa. a lion pass. ar. langued gu. Crest—A lion pass. sa.
22) (Beaconfield, near Plymouth, co. Devon). Sa. a lion pass. ar. langued gu. in chief an annulet or, for diff. Crest— A leopard pass. ppr.
23) (Mythe House, Tewkesbury, co. Gloucester). Az. on a cross flory or, five martlets sa. on a chief of the second a fleur-de-lis betw. two annulets gu. Crest—A lion pass. gu.
24) (Pennington House, co. Hants). Motto—Consequitur quodcunque petit. (Pennington House, co. Hants). Erm. a lion ramp. guard. az. on a chief embattled gu. a fleur-de-lis or, betw. two boars’ heads couped erect ar. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour, the hand in a gauntlet, grasping a javelin all ppr. pendent from the wrist by a ribbon az and resting on a wreath of the colours an escutcheon gu. thereon a boar’s head couped erect ar.
25) (Portsmouth, co. Hants; granted 1750). Sa. a lion pass. ar. in chief an escallop or, betw. two estoiles of the last. Crest—An ounce sejant or, collared az. supporting with the dexter paw a plain shield sa. charged with two tttoiles in chief ar. and in base an escallop or.
26) (Shadockhurst and Park House, co. Kent, bart., extinct 1720; Sir Thomas Taylor, Bart., of Park House and Gray’s Inn, London; descended from Jons TAaylor, Esq., of Shadockhurst, same co., temp. Henry VIII., was created a bart. 1664; Sir Thomas Taylor, third bart., d. s. p.). Ar. on a chief sa. two boars’ heads couped of the first.
27) (Turnham, co. Kent; confirmed by Cooke, Clarenceux, 1587, to John Taylor, of Turnham, gent.). Motto—Qui plane sane vadit. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a chief sa. two boars' heads couped of the first, for Taylor; 2nd and 3rd, sa. a chev. erm. betw. three greyhounds pass, ar., for Aadam. Crest—A martin statant or.
28) (Rev. Charles Taylor, D.D., Chancellor of the diocese of Hereford, and Prebend of Montan Magna). Erm. on a chief sa. three escallops or, quartering or, a chev. betw. three leopards’ faces sa., for Wheeler. Crest—A demi lion erm. holding betw. the paws an escallop or.
29) (Bifrons, co. Kent, originally from Whitchurch, co. Salop; descended from Nathaniel Taylour, Esq., M.P. for co. Beds, and Recorder of Colchester, who purchased Bifrons 1694, since sold to the Marquess Conyngham). Motto—Kama Candida rosa dulcior. Gu. three roses ar. barbed vert, a chief vair. Crest—A lion's head erased ar. collared gu. charged with three roses of the first.
30) (Tunbridge Wells, co. Kent; Andrew Taylor, Esq., of Tunbridge Wells). Motto—Magna vis veritatis. Az. on a pile betw. two lions’ heads erased in base or, three escutcheons of the field, each charged with an escallop ar. Crest—A lion ramp. guard. ppr. charged with a sun in splendour or, supporting with the sinister forepaw a shield az. charged with an escallop ar.
31) (London; granted 11 Sept. 1592). Az. on a fess cotised or, three lions ramp. sa. Crest—A tiger's head erased sa. ducally gorged or.
32) (London; the late Michael Angelo Taylor, Esq., M.P.). Sa. a lion pass. ar. langued gu. in chief an annidet or, for diff. Crest—A lion pass. sa.
33) (London, 1634). Gu. three roses ar. a chief chequy of the last and sa. Crest—A lion's head erased erm. collared gu. thereon three roses ar.
34) (Heston, co. Middlesex). Az. a bend engr. or, betw. three doves’ heads erased ppr.
35) (Brooms, co. Stafford; William Bewley Taylor, of the Brooms, Stone). Quarterly, ar. and sa. a cross flory quarterly within an orle all counterchanged. Crest—A grey¬hound’s head couped ar. gorged with a collar sa. within a strap in arch az. the buckle resting on the wreath on the sinister side or.
36) (Worcester Park, co. Surrey). Or, a chev. betw. two lions pass. in chief and an annulet in base sa. Crest—A demi greyhound az. collared, and holding in the dexter paw an annulet or.
37) (Hollycombe, co. Sussex, bart.). Paly of six erm. and erminois, on a chief indented sa. three escallops or. Crest—A demi lion erminois, charged on tbe body with two escallops sa. and holding another escallop of the last betw. the paws.
38) (Morton Hall, and Whalley Abbey, co. Lancaster, and Bashall Hall, co. York). Motto—Annoso robore quercus. Erm. on a chief dovetailed gu. a mallet betw. two escallops or. Crest—A demi lion sa. semée of mailets or, holding betw. the paws an acorn gold, slipped vert.
39) (Pilling-Taylor; exemplified to Miss Margaret Pilling, of Morton Hall, co. Lancaster, upon her assuming, by royal licence, the additional surname and arms of Taylor). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, erm. on a chief dovetailed gu. a mallet betw. two escallops or, for Taylor; 2nd and 3rd, ar. three piles az. over all on a chev. engr. plain cotised or, five hurts, for Pilling.
40) (Todmorden, co. Lancaster, and Culverlands, co. Berks). Motto—Natale solum dulce. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, per pale ar. and or, an escarbuncle az. on a chief nebulée of the last a ducal coronet betw. two escallops of the second, for Taylor; 2nd and 3rd, per chev. or and vert, in chief a tau betw. two crosses patonce fitchée gu. in base a hind trippant ar. charged on the neck with a tau of the third, for Crossley. Crest—A demi lion ramp. az. charged on the shoulder with a bezant, holding betw. his paws an escutcheon or, charged with a tau gu.
41) (co. Lancaster, and London; granted 24 Dec. 1674). Erm. on a chief indented sa. three escallops or. Crest—A demi lion ramp. erm. holding betw. the paws an escallop or.
42) (Strensham Court, co. Worcester). Motto—Fidelisque ad mortem. (Moseley Hall, co. Worcester). Ar. guttee de poix, on a chief dancettée sa. a pale betw. two escallops of the first, charged with an escallop of the second. Crest—A demi lion ramp. ppr. semée of escallops sa. holding betw. the paws a saltire also sa. surmounted by an escallop ar.
43) (St. James’s, Westminster). Quarterly, ar. and sa. a cross patonce counterchanged, in the first quarter a ducal coronet gu. Crest—A greyhound’s head quarterly ar. and ea. gorged with a collar or, charged with a ducal coronet gu.
44) (Kirkham Abbey, co. York). Erm. on a pale engr. sa. three lions pass. or. Crest—A leopard pass. per pale ppr. and erm. the dexter paw resting on a shield erm. charged with a pale, as in the arms.
45) (co. York). Az. a cher. ar. betw. three escallops or. Crest—A demi talbot or, holding in the mouth an arrow in pale.
46) Erm. on a chief dancettée sa. a ducal coronet or, betw. two escallops ar. Crest—A demi lion ramp. sa. holding betw. the paws a ducal coronet or.
47) Erm. on a chev. sa. betw. three anchors az. as many escallops ar. Crest—A stork supporting with the dexter claw an anchor ppr.
48) Sa. a chev. betw. two lions pass. in chief and an annulet in base or. Crest—A demi greyhound sa. ringed and collared or, in the dexter paw an annulet of the last.
49) Erm. on a fess indented sa. three escallops ar.
50) Az. a lion ramp. ar. depressed by a bend gu. charged with three escallops of the second.
51) (impaled by Checkland). Per pale az. and sa. three chevronels ar. betw. as many unicorns pass. or.
52) (Dublin, and Lincoln’s Inn; descended from James Taylour, Esq., fourth son of Sir Thomas Taylour, Bart.). Motto—Consequitur quodcunque petit. Erm. on a chief gu. a fleur-de-lis betw. two boars’ heads couped and ereet or, a crescent for diff. Crest—A naked arm couped at the shoulder embowed, holding an arrow ppr.
53) (Ballyhaise, co. Cavan; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1636, Brockhill Taylor, Esq., of Ballyhaise, whose eldest dau. and co-heir, Elizabeth Taylor m. Humphry Perrott, Esq., of Drumahaise, same co.). Ar. on a chief sa. two boars’ heads couped fessways of the first, langued gu.
54) (Ballyphilip, co. Cork; registered by Carney, Ulster, 1656, to Captain John Taylor, of Ballyphilip, who went to Ireland in Colonel Saunders’ Regt.). Gu. a lion pass. betw. two oak trees eradicated in fess all or, on a chief ar. a dexter hand couped and erect sa. betw. two pellets. Crest—An Irish rebel’s head ppr.
55) (Ardgillan Castle, co. Dublin). Motto—Prosequitur quodeunque petit. Erm. on a chief gu. a fleur-de-lis betw. two boars’ heads couped and erect or. Crest—A naked arm embowed holding an arrow ppr.
56) (Old Court, Harold’s Cross, co. Dublin; confirmed to Philip Meadows Taylor, Esq., C.S.I., for many years a Political Commissioner in India, and to the other descendants of his grandfather, Rev. Philip Taylor, of Dublin). Sa. a lion pass. ar. in chief a trefoil slipped or. Crest—A leopard pass. ppr. charged on the shoulder with a trefoil slipped vert.
57) (granted by Betham, Ulster, to Abraham Beresford Taylor, Esq., Lieut.-Col. 9th Regt., and to Thomas Matthew Taylor, Esq, Lieut.-Col. 11th Light Cavalry, H.E.l.C.S., sons of James Taylor, Esq., of Cranbrook, co. Fermanagh, and grandsons of Thomas Taylor, Lord Mayor of Dublin 1750, by Anne, his wife, only dau. of Captain Michael Beresford, and granddau. of Sir Tristram Beresford, Bart., of Coleraine). Motto—Incorrupta fides. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. a lion pass. or, gorged with a wreath of trefoils ppr. in chief pendent by a ribband a representation of the silver medal presented to Lieut.-Col. Abraham Beresford Taylor, for his gallant services in action at Cabool, Sept. 1842, ppr. betw. two Eastern crowns of the second, for Taylor; 2nd and 3rd, ar. crusily fitchée three fleurs-de-lis within a border engr. sa. a crescent gu. for diff., for Beresford. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour, the hand in a gauntlet grasping a sword ppr. tho arm encircled above the dhow by an annulet az. and charged with two bombs fired also ppr. Motto—Fide non timet
58) (Athboy, co. Meath; registered by Betham, Ulster, to Thomas Taylor, of Athboy, and Dublin Castle). Sa. a lion pass. per pale gu. and ar. Crest—A lion pass. per pale gu. and az.
59) (Fun. Ent. Ulster Office, Jeremiah Taylor, Bishop of Down, 1661, d. 13 Aug. 1667). Ar. on a chief indented gu.three escallops or.
60) (Reg. Ulster’s Office). Per pale az. and or, a chev. betw. three bucks’ heads cabossed counterchanged, on a chief per pale of the second and first two greyhounds salient counter-salient, collared and ringed also counterchanged.
61) (Watson-Taylor, Erlestoke, co. Wilts, and Lyssons Hall, Island of Jamaica). Mottoes—In hoc signo vinces, for Taylor; Jus floreat, for Watson. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a saltire wavy sa. betw. two cinquefoils in fess vert and two human hearts in pale gu. a canton erm., for Taylor; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a tree growing out of a mount in base vert, surmounted of a fess az. charged with three mullets of the field, for Watson. Crests—1st, Taylor: in aducal coronetor, a cubit arm ereet ppr. holding a cross crosslet in pale gu.; 2nd. Watson: The stump of a tree sprouting out branches ppr. Supporters—Two leopards ppr. collared and chained or.
62) (Fort St. George, East Indies, 1792). Motto—Tenax propositi. Ar. on a saltire engr. sa. betw. a heart in chief gu. two cinquefoils in flanks vert, and a fleur-de-lis in base of the third, an annulet or. Crest—A dexter arm issuing from a heart, grasping a scymitar all ppr.
63) (Robert Taylor, H. E. I.C.S., 1812). Motto—Non arte sed marte. Quarterly, 1st, ar. a saltire wavy sa. betw. a heart in chief and base gu. and two cinquefoils in flank vert; 2nd, ar. three stars of six rays wavy az. within a bordure engr. of the last, for Innes, of Cathlaw; 3rd, az. three boars’ heads eiased or, for Gordon; 4th, gu. a lion ramp. ar. within a bordure of the last charged with eight roses of the first, for Dunbar. Crest—A dexter arm from the shoulder embowed, grasping a sword at the point all ppr.
64) (Manchester, 1817). Ar. on a saltire wavy sa. betw. a heart in chief and base gu. and two cinquefoils in flank vert, a hunting horn of the first, stringed of the third. Crest—Issuing out of a ducal coronet or, a dexter hand erect ppr. holding a cross crosslet fitchée in pale gu.
65) (London; granted 1592). Az. two bars wavy ar. in chief a lion pass. guard. or. Crest—A demi otter ramp. or.
66) Az. a chev. betw. three escallops ar.
67) (Marquess of Headfort). Motto—Consequitur quodeunque petit. Erm. on a chief gu. a fleur-de-lis betw. two boars’ heads couped and erect or. Crest—A naked arm couped at the shoulder embowed, holding an arrow ppr. Supporters—Dexter, a lion guard, or; sinister, a leopard guard, ppr., both plain collared and chained ar.
68) (Steventon, co. Bedford, and co. Devon; granted Nov. 1610). Az. a saltire voided betw. four bucks’ heads cabossed or. Crest—A bucks’ head cabossed ppr. pierced through with two arrows in saltire gu. headed and feathered ar.
69) (co. Cambridge, Haleston Grange, co. Gloucester, and Bradley, co. Hants). Sa. a lion pass. ar. Crest—A leopard pass. ppr.
70) (Parkhouse, co. Kent; granted 158S). Ar. on a chief sa. two boars’ heads couped of the field. Crest—A martin pass. or.
71) (co. Lancaster, and Middleton Cheney, co. Northampton). Erm. on a chief indented gu. three escallops or. Crest—A lion’s head erased sa. ducally gorged or.
72) (London). Or, a chev. betw. two lions ramp. in chief and a lozenge in base sa.
73) (London). Barry wavy of four ar. and az. on a chief of the second a lion pass. guard. or.
74) (London). Sa. on a fess cotised or, three lions ramp. of the field.
75) (London). Or, a fess danccttéc ermines betw. three eagles displ. sa.
76) (London, and co. Salop). Ar. three roses gu. a chief vair. Crest—A cubit arm erect, vested vair, holding in the hand ppr. three roses gu. leaved and stalked vert.
77) (London, and co. Sussex). Or, a chev. betw. two lions pass. in chief and an annulet in base sa. Crest—A demi greyhound ramp. az. collared and ringed or, in tho dexter paw an annulet of the laat.
78) (Westminster; granted 14 Feb. 1714-15). Gu. a chev. ar. fimbriated or, betw. three escallops of the second. Crest—A leopard's head erminois.
79) (co. Wilts). Gu. on a cross betw. four taus ar. a goat's head erased sa. attired.or.
80) Erm. on a chief indented sa. three trefoils of the field (another, or; another, ar.).
81) Az. semée of crosses crosslet ar. three boars’ heads erased of the second.
82) Or, a fess indented ermines betw. three eagles displ. gu.
83) Gu. on a fess engr. or, betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar. as many mullets az.
84) (Swords, co. Dublin; Richard Taylour, temp. Henry VIII. Visit. Dublin, 1607). (city of Dublin; Thomas Taylour, living at Visit. Dublin, 1607, was son of Francis Taylour, Mayor of the city 1599, and grandson of Robert Taylour, Bailiff of the city 1543, brother of Richard Taylour, of Swords, temp. Henry VIII.). (Dublin; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1605, James Taylour, Sheriff of the city). (Dublin; Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1617, William Taylour, of that city, commonly called Ensign Taylour). Az. a lion ramp. ar. debruised by a bendlet gu. thereon three escallops or.
85) Sa. a lion pass. in fess ar.
86) (Carrigfergus, co. Antrim; confirmed by Carney, Ulster, to Rev. Timothy Taylour, Pastor of Carrigfergus Church, son of John Taylour and Jane his wife, of Sommerford, co. Chester, 6. 31 Jan. 1609). Motto—Stella futura micat divino lumine. Erm. on a bend sa. a taper enflamed and the sunbeams issuing out of the dexter point all ppr. Crest—A star ppr. betw. two wings expanded az.
87) (Dublin, and Lincoln’s Inn; descended from James Taylour, Esq., fourth son of Sir Thomas Taylour, Bart.). Motto—Consequitur quodcunque petit. Erm. on a chief gu. a fleur-de-lis betw. two boars’ heads couped and ereet or, a crescent for diff. Crest—A naked arm couped at the shoulder embowed, holding an arrow ppr.
88) Per pale az. and or, a chev. betw. three bucks’ heads cabossed counterchanged. on a chief gu. two greyhounds pass. ar. collared of the second, respecting cach other. Crest—A talbot's head erased ar. eared sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19