Thatcher Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Thatcher Family Coat of Arms

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Thatcher Coat of Arms Meaning

Thatcher Name Origin & History

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Thatcher Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Thatcher blazon are the grasshopper, cross moline and sword. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and gules .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

According to Wade, the Grasshopper was regarded by the Athenians as a “special symbol of nobility” and believes that this meaning be also applied to its use within a coat of arms. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P70 It is not a common device but when shown is drawn in lifelike fashion. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Grasshopper

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 13Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross moline is typical of these whereby each arm of the cross expands and curves outwards, reminscent of the fer-de-moline from which it gets its name. These cross variations are probably largely for decorative effect, and to differentiate the arms from similar ones and hence their significance is that of the Christian cross itself.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. Indeed, the sheer variety of different swords 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302 can be bewildering and expaining the difference between a scimitar and a falchion is perhaps best left to the expert! If a charge is described just as a simple sword then it will have a straight blade and cross handle, that may be of a different colour, and, unless specified, points upwards. Wade, quoting the earlier writer Guillim, signifies the use of the sword as representing “Government and Justice”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Thatcher Name

Thatcher Origin:

England

Origins of Thatcher:

The surname of Thatcher hails from the country of England, and is an occupational surname. This means that the original bearer of the surname of Thatcher most likely was in charge of roofing, and creating roofing materials, meaning that he actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son. In the case of the surname of Thatcher, those who were given this surname were often praised as one of the most important occupations of ancient times, because they created protection for homes in towns and cities across the country of England. Those who carried out the occupation of Thatcher were known for using specially grown weatherproof reed and straw, and applying it to the homes within the area where they worked. The word itself comes from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “taca” which can be translated to mean “a roof of thatch” which also is combined with the suffix of “er” which can be translated to mean, “one who worked,” or “one who does work.” Thus the literal translation of the surname of Thatcher is “one who works with the thatched roof.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Thacher, Thacker, Thaxter

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Thatcher can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Reginald le Thechare, who was mentioned in the document known as the Hundred Rolls of the county of Oxford, in the year of 1273. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Edward I of England, who was known throughout the ages as one “The Hammer of the Scots,” and was thus named for the horrors and conquests that he imposed on the people of Scotland throughout his reign. King Edward I of England was in power from the year of 1272 to the year of 1307. Other mentions of the surname of Thatcher within the country of England include one William Thecker who was recorded as living within Norfolk in the year of 1301, one Ricardus Theker, who was mentioned as being a Freeman of York in the year of 1379.

Scotland:

Within the country of Scotland, there is a large population of those who are known by the surname of Thatcher. Among the earliest recordings of this surname of Thatcher within the country of Scotland was one Thomas Thekar, who was described as being a criminal in the Aberdeen Jail in the year of 1411.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th Century, man European citizens migrated to America as part of the European Migration. Among them were Jo Thatcher and Mary Thatcher, who were the first recorded Thatcher’s in the United States, and who settled in the state of Virginia in 1635.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Thatcher: United States 11,497; England 3,942; Australia 1,521; South Africa 1,333; Canada 750; Kenya 706; Wales 339; Germany 235; New Zealand 201, Scotland 138; Venezuela 125; France 122; Brazil 64

Notable People:

Richard Thatcher (1846-1901) who was a veteran of the American Civil War, and who served as the first President of the Territorial Normal School from the year of 1891 to the year of 1893, and which is now known as the University of Central Oklahoma, and who was also an educator from America.

Kim Thatcher (born in 1964) who serves as a Member of the Oregon Senate, from the year of 2015 to present, and who is a politician from America.

Karen Elizabeth Thatcher (born in 1984) who is a three-time gold medalist in the sport of ice hockey, who is a forward, and is from America.

J.T. Thatcher (born in 1978) who was a former football defensive back from America.

Eva Thatcher (1862-1942) who was a film actress that appeared in over 100 films from the year of 1912 and the year of 1930, and who was from America.

George Thatcher (1754-1824) who was a jurist, lawyer, and statesman from America, and who served as the Delegate for the Massachusetts to the Continental Congress in the year of 1787, and then again the year of 1788, and who also served as the Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court from the year of 1801 to the year of 1824

Thatcher Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(co. Essex). Gu a cross moline argent on a chief or, three grasshoppers proper. Crest—A Saxon sword or seax proper.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P70
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Grasshopper
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P302