Toms Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Toms Family Coat of Arms

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Toms Coat of Arms Meaning

Toms Name Origin & History

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Toms Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Toms blazon are the garb and cornish chough. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Europe in the middle ages was still a largely agrarian society, and the wealth of the nobility resided in their estates and land. Since most people still lived and worked on the land they would find farm implements instantly recognisable, (an important feature for a coat of arms), even if they seem obscure to us today. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86 The garb for example is an ancient word for wheatsheaf, something now more frequently seen in Inn signs than in the field! 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The Cornish Chough is a member of the crow family and is often depicted as black with red or orange beak and legs. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cornish chough Wade gives it the role of “king of crows” and believes that its use denotes a “man of stratagems”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P82

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Toms Name

Toms Origin:

England

Origin of Toms:

This interesting and unique name meaning “the son of Thomas” is belonging to the particular old provided name of religious origin. The religious name was authentically an Armaic byname meaning “twin,” produced by one of the adherents of Christ, familiar for his skepticism about Christ’s restoration. After the Invasion of 1066, “Thomas” was found only as the name of a religious person and later 1066 it developed into one of the most unusual Christian names. There are several local variations of this name in all languages. In England, they were found as Tomas, Toms, Tombs, Tomkiss, etc. Walter Thomas came in Hundred Rolls of Wiltshire in 1275, while the Assize Court Rolls of Kent record a Hugo Tomas in 1317. Ann, daughter of John and Katherine Tomas named in 1635 at St. Botolph without Aldgate, London and Edmund, son of John Toms named on July 1638 at Wandsworth London. Peter Toms (departed 1777) recorded in “the National Biography” as a remarkable painter and adviser who developed into a member of the Royal Academy in 1768.

Variations:

Some common variations are: Thomas, Tomes, Tomms, Tooms, Tomas. Toams, Tomsa, Tomos, Tomis, Tomus.

England:

The surname Toms first originated in Cornwall where they held a family seat from ancient times; some say pre-the Norman Invasion in 1066.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Alan de William Tom, dated 1245, Hornchurch Priory, Essex. It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

People with the surname Toms had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Toms settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Toms who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Eliz Toms and Mary Tomes; both arrived in Virginia in the same year 1665. Fran Toms, who landed in Virginia in 1666. William Toms, who arrived in Maryland in 1672 and John Toms, who landed in Maryland in 1676.

Some of the people with the name Toms who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Gabriel Toms, who arrived in Virginia in 1703. Edward Toms, who landed in Virginia in 1725 and Catherine Toms, who landed in Frederick division, Maryland in 1768 in the 18th century.

The following century also saw many people with surname Toms arrive. Samuel Toms, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1833. A C Toms who landed in Francisco, California in 1850. James Toms settled in Shoe Cove in 1851 and Cornelius Toms at the age of 37, arrived in New York, NY in 1873 in the 19th century.

Canada:

Individuals with the surname Toms settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Toms who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Sarah Toms and Thorns Toms both arrived in Nova Scotia in the same year 1750.

Mary Toms arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick aboard the ship “Zephyr” in 1833 and Albert Toms, who arrived in Canada in 1839 in the 19th century.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Toms who settled in Australia in the 18th century included William Toms, an English prisoner from Surrey, who transported aboard the ship “Albion” on May 1828, settling in New South Wales, Australia. George Toms arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Constance” in 1848. John Thomas Toms arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the “John Munn” in 1849. Elizabeth Toms, at the age of 23, a servant, arrived in South Australia in 1853 aboard the ship “Calabar”, and George Toms at the age of 21 who was a laborer, arrived in South Australia in 1859 aboard the ship “ David McIvor”.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Toms who settled in New Zealand in the 18th century included Joseph Toms landed in Queen Charlotte, New Zealand in 1830. John Toms at the age of 44, Mary A. Toms at the age of 44, Charles Toms, aged 21 and Elizabeth Toms at the age of 21 all arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “New Era” in 1855.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Toms: United States 5,844; England 4,393; Portugal 3,380; Angola 3,201; Australia 1,628; Argentina 896; Canada 1,215; South Africa 1,096; Brazil 620; Mexico 523.

Notable People:

Billy Toms (1895 – unknown), was an Irish football player.

Carl Toms (1927 – 1999), was a British set and clothes designer.

David Toms, (born 1967) was an American golf player on the PGA Tour.

Edward Toms, (1899–1971) was a British sportsman.

Eric Toms (born 1979), is an American entertainer.

Jeff Toms, (born 1974) is a Canadian player in ice hockey.

Kevin Toms was a computer game inventor or creator.

Toms Family Gift Ideas

Browse Toms family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

A garb between four Cornish choughs proper - Crest, a Cornish chough, volant, proper.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cornish chough
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P82