Tower Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Tower Family Coat of Arms

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Tower Coat of Arms Meaning

Tower Name Origin & History

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Tower Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Tower blazon are the tower, arrow and griffin. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, gules and sable .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Architectural items, from individual components to entire buildings 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92 feature frequently as charges In a coat of arms. Not surprisingly, considering the times from which many arms date, fortifications are common. The tower Is a typical example of an object from the world of architecture adopted, albeit in a stylised form, for use in heraldry. It can be placed alone, or frequently with three turrets on the top, known as a tower triple towered, and can have doors and windows of a different colour. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tower In continental European heraldry they are often accompanied by pictorial effects such as armoured knights scaling them on ladders.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The regular prescence of the arrow, both singly and in groups is evidence of this. In British heraldry a lone arrow normally points downward, but in the French tradition it points upwards. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Arrow. The presence of an arrow in a coat of arms is reckoned to indicate “martial readiness” by Wade. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]17Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Tower Name

Tower Origin:

England

Origin of Tower:

It is a unique and fascinating surname. It has been listed in many spelling forms like Tour, De la Tour, Latour, Torre, de la Torre, and smaller such as Touret, Torricina, etc. This surname can also be expressed as ‘European.’ In origin, it can be considered as Roman before the Christian period. Furthermore, it was listed in various spellings mostly all over the European continent since the ancient times of 13th century. The surname is not only associated from a locational origin but also from the worker’s origin, and expresses the individual who lived in and possibly had a secured palace or small castle, one possibly of a single tower. The original word acquired from the Latin word ‘turris.’ This name holds multiple spellings forms like Tours or Towers acquired from the city of Tours, in France. The city name derives from the before of the 7th-century Gaelic group known as the ‘Turones,’ who were remarkable in the days after the declining of Roman Union in 410 A.D. Previous examples of the surname were organized in England. These examples consist of Gilbert le Tower in the 1255 revolution of the division of Wiltshire, and William de la Tur, in the Assize Court Revolution of Cambridgeshire in the year 1260. Other documentation derived from the parish schedules consist as in France Jeanne de la Tour, of Angers St Jacques, born in April 1693, and in Mexico, Manuel de la Torre, at Ascuncion, Districto Federal, in December 1747.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Towery, Towera, Towere, Toweri, Touwer, Toweer, Taower, Towoer, Toer, Twer.

England:

The name Tower was firstly originated in Lancashire where they held a family seat from old times and were the kings of the castle of Lowick or Lofwick. William’s trip guided William the Conqueror at the war of Hastings and donated areas under tenants in head, the Lord of Kendall. Few divisions of this notable boundary continued in Lancashire, at the same time more units south to Sowerby in Lincolnshire, and the Island of Ely. More of this family accepted the name Lowick and Lofwick and continued in Lancashire.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Elyas de Toure, which was dated about 1202, in the Pipe Rolls of the division of Somerset. It was during the time of King John of England, known as “Lackland,” dated 1199 – 1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties from the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Tower settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Tower who settled in the United States in the 17th century included John Tower settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1637. John Tower, who arrived in Hingham, Massachusetts in 1637. Francis Tower, who came to Maryland in 1638. John Tower settled in New England with five children in 1641, Robert Tower, who landed in Virginia in 1650.

Some of the people with the name Tower who settled in the United States in the 19th century included James Tower, at the age of 22, landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1805. Mary Tower, Peggy Tower, Ann Tower and Catharine Tower, all these people arrived in the same year in 1808.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Tower who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Jos Tower landed in Nova Scotia in 1760.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Tower who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Elizabeth Tower at the age of 31 and Peter Tower at the age of 22 both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Lysander” in the same year in 1851.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Tower: United States 6,347; England 457; Mexico 314; Pakistan 1,006; Australia 141; Philippines 967; Brazil 270; Saudi Arabia 154; Turkey 140; 1,220.

Notable People:

Charlemagne Tower (1809-1889), was an American advocate, knight, and administrator.

Charlemagne Tower, Jr. (1848-1923), was an American minister.

Joan Tower (born 1938), is an American writer of classical music.

John Tower (1925-1991), was an American congressman.

Wells Tower, (born 1973), is an American author.

William Lawrence Tower (born 1872), is an American biologist.

Zealous Bates Tower (1819-1900), was an American fighter.

Tower Family Gift Ideas

Browse Tower family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Weald Hall, co. Essex, and Huntsmore Park, co. Bucks). Motto—Love and dread. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, sable a tower or, for TOWERS; 2nd, gules three arrows, points downwards or, for HALE; 3rd, per pale or and gules a chevron between three cinquefoils counterchanged, on a chief per pale of the second and first two escallops counterchanged, for TASH. Crest—A griffin pass, per pale or and azure wings endorsed gold.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tower
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Arrow
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
17. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150