Tully Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Tully Family Coat of Arms

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Tully Coat of Arms Meaning

Tully Name Origin & History

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Tully Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Tully blazon are the lion passant, escallop, chevron and wolf. The two main tinctures (colors) are vert and argent.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.13The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Tully Name

Tully Origin:

England, Ireland

Origins of Tully:

The surname of Tully is said to be a patronymic surname hailing largely from the country of Ireland. The first possible origin of this surname of Tully is that it is an Anglicization of the Gaelic surname of “O’Taihlagh,” which can be translated to mean “the descendant of Taithleach,” which itself can be translated to mean “quiet,” and “peaceable.” The second possible origin of the surname of Tully is that it comes from the Gaelic “O’Maoc Tuile,” which can be translated to mean “the descendant of the devotee of St. Tuile.” Tuile itself can be derived from the word “toil,” which can be translated to mean “will of God.” In the case of Gaelic surnames, many of them are patronymic. It is common that Irish surnames are taken from the heads of the tribes or clans, or from a famous and notable warrior. Gaelic surnames are usually prefixed by “O’” which often denotes male descendant of, son of, or grandson of,” or the prefix of “Mac” which can be translated to mean “son of.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Tulley, Tuly, Tuley, Tullie, Tueley, Tooly, Toolly, Toolley, Tooley, Toolie, Tulliy, Tually, Tiully

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Tully can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Anna Tully was recorded in the church registers of the church of St. Martin in the Fields, which is located in Westminster, London, in the year of 1649. Anna Tully was christened at the church of St. Martin in the Fields on December 7, 1649. This christening was ordered and decreed under the reign of one King Charles I of England, Scotland, and Ireland who ruled from the year of 1625 to the year of 1649. Other mentions of the surname of Tully within the country of England include one Ann Tully, who was married to one John Woodtoe in London in the year of 1674.

Ireland:

Within the country of England, the surname of Tully is believed to derive in County Clare and County Galway, as well as County Tyrone and County Fermanagh. Within the country of Ireland, one person by the name of Margaret Tully married a man by the name of Henry Adnott at Clones, which is located in County Monaghan, in the year of 1756 on April 6th. Those who bear the surname of Tully within the country of Ireland can be found in large concentrations in the area of County Galway.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th and 18th Centuries, it became common for European citizens to migrate to the United States of America, which at that time was known as the New World, or the Colonies. These citizens were in search of a better life for them and their families, and the United States promised freedoms that these citizens had never been afforded before. These freedoms included the ability to own land, worship whichever god they chose, and better living conditions. Among those who migrated to the New World was one Joane Tully, who arrived in the state of Maryland in the year of 1661, becoming the first person within the United States of America who was recorded to bear the surname of Tully.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Tully: United States 11,308; England 3,845; Ireland 2,096; Canada 1,156; Tanzania 997; South Africa 731; Scotland 394; Germany 303; Northern Ireland 250; Namibia 244; Wales 226

Notable People:

Tom Tully (1908-1982) who was an actor from Durango, Colorado, which is located in the United States of America.

Rush Tully (born in 1949) who was a operatic bass-baritone and composer from the United States of America.

Michael “Mike” Scott Tully (born in 1956) who was a two-time gold medalist pole vaulter from the United States of America.

R Bent Tully (born in 1940) who was an astronomer from the United States of America.

Richard Walton Tully (1877-1945) who was an author from the United States of America.

Jim Tully (1886-1947) who was a writer from the United States of America.

James “Jim” Tully (1915-1992) who was a trade unionist from the country of Ireland.

Charles Patrick “Charlie” Tully (1924-1971) who was a footballer from the country of Ireland.

Montgomery Tully (1904-1988) who was a film director and writer from the country of Ireland.

Susan Tully (born in 1968) who was a former actress in EastEnders and and a television director, and who is from the country of England.

Tully Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Wetherall Abbey; co. Cumberland). Ar. on a chev. gu. three escallops or, in chief a lion pass. vert. Crest—A cupid with his bow and quiver all ppr.
2) (co. Galway; Reg. Ulster's Office). Vert a chev. betw. three wolves' heads erased ar. Crest—A wolf's head couped ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
13. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45