Tyndall Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Tyndall Family Coat of Arms

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Tyndall Coat of Arms Meaning

Tyndall Name Origin & History

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Tyndall Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Tyndall blazon are the garb and fess. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and argent .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Europe in the middle ages was still a largely agrarian society, and the wealth of the nobility resided in their estates and land. Since most people still lived and worked on the land they would find farm implements instantly recognisable, (an important feature for a coat of arms), even if they seem obscure to us today. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86 The garb for example is an ancient word for wheatsheaf, something now more frequently seen in Inn signs than in the field! 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Tyndall Name

This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a locational name for someone who resided in the valley of the river Tyne, or from Tindall, a place in Cumberland, which is situated on a tributary of the South Tyne.  This river, anciently called “Tina”, derives its name from the British root “ti-” to flow. (“British” in this case refers to the extinct Celtic language of the ancient Britons).  The second element is the Olde English pre 7th Century “dael” a valley.  During the Middle Ages when migration for the purpose of job-seeking was becoming more common people often took their former village name as a means of recognition, thus resulting in a wide dispersal of the name. The surname first noted in the latter half of the 12th Century. More common variations are: Dtyndall, Tuyndall, Tyindall, Tyndaill, Tyndal, Tindall, Tendall, Tyndale, Tyndell, Tundall

The surname Tyndall first found in Northumberland, where Tindale is an extensive ward or district which includes the Dale of Tyne. The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Adam de Tindal, dated about 1165, in the “Pipe Rolls of Northumberland”.  It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be the “The Builder of Churches”, dated 1154 – 1189.

Individuals with the surname Tyndall landed in the United States in the 17th century. Some of the people with the name Tyndall who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Robert Tyndall, who settled in Virginia in 1606.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Argent a fess gules between three garbs sable.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse