Wood Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Wood Family Coat of Arms

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Wood Coat of Arms Meaning

Wood Name Origin & History

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Wood Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main heraldic symbols in the Wood Coat of Arms (sometimes erroneously called the Wood Family Crest) are the savage (or wild man), wolf, and oak tree.

Heraldry is a human art, by and for people and it is not surprising that people themselves are frequently depicted in arms. As well as the nobility themselves, we also see both the mundane, ploughmen, fishermen and reapers; and the exotic in the form of club wielding savagesand the Moorish or Saracen gentleman with his decorative wreathed turban.

The wolf was the symbol of Rome long before the advent of heraldry, and before that was sacred to the ancient Egyptians. In heraldry it is probably more often just as head than the whole animal, but when whole it can be in many different poses. It is found from the earliest instances of arms, but quite often due to a derivative of its French name, loup sharing the initial sound of many family names like LOWE and LOVATT.

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves. Although sometimes described simply as a tree most often the specific species was named, and the oak tree or oak leaf is a typical example that frequently is depicted in arms, sometimes fructed with acorns of a different colour. For good reason, Wade assigns the meaning of “antiquity and strength” to this symbol.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Wood Name

Surname Name Meaning, Origin, and Etymology
This primarily English, Scottish, and Welsh last name is a locational surname meaning “at the wood”, referring to a person who lived near (or in) a wooded areas. The name is common to every medieval register throughout Britain. It derives from the Old English word wudu, meaning woods. It may also be a metonymic occupational name for a forester or woodcutter. Lastly, it may have developed as a nickname for a violent, mad, frenzied, wild or, eccentric person, from the Middle English word wod or the Old English word wad, although authors seems to believe this origin and Wood surname meaning is less likely. One source claims the name into England during the Norman Conquest of 1066 AD, and the family first lived in Leicestershire (a county in central England) where they owned land in Thorpe Arnold. They later moved into Dumfriesshire where they held land and titles in circa 1150 AD. One source asserts the name is a latinized form of de Bosco, and that the family descends from a Norman Knight named Ernald de Bosco, a companion of William the Conqueror.

In his book Patronymica Britannica, Mark Antony Lower, states the following in regard to this surname: “This surname is found so early as Domesday in the form of De Silva, Suffolk”.

Spelling Variations
Common spelling variants or names with similar etymologies include Woode, Wode, Woodde, Wad, Woods, Woodes, Would, Vould, Voud, and Woid. The name itself serves as the root of hundreds of other surnames such as Woodward, Lockwood, Lakewood, Atwood, Wynewood, Redwood, Woodman, Woodstock, Sherwood, Smallwood, Spotswood, Brewood, Woodbridge, Norwood, Greenwood, Harwood, Woodford, Elwood, Dikewood,Englewood, Underwood, and Southwood just to name a few.

Popularity & Geographic Distribution
The last name Wood ranks 75th in popularity in terms in the United Status as of the 2000 Census.  The name ranks particularly high in the following ten states: Vermont, Virginia, Oklahoma, Utah, Oregon, Idaho, Maine, Montana, Alaska, and Wyoming. The surname is even more common in England, where it ranks 30th. It ranks highest in the following counties:  Kent, Yorkshire, Derbyshire, and Sussex. In Scotland, the name is most common in Kincardineshire and Berwickshire. In Ireland, the name Wood is most frequent in Cork, Leitrim, and Louth. In Wales, the name is most frequent in Montgomeryshire and Merionethshire. The name is common throughout the English speaking world:  Scotland (54th), Wales (72nd), Ireland (882nd), Canada (71st), New Zealand (73rd), Australia (47th), and South Africa (314th). The 1890 book Homes of Family Names by H.B. Guppy, states the following in regard to this surname: “This name has established itself in the greater number of the English counties; but its home, par excellence, is in the region comprised by Yorkshire, Cheshire, and the northern midland counties of Derbyshire, Notts, Staffordshire, and Leicestershire. It has, however, also an independent and important home in the south – east of England in Kent and Sussex. Except in Devonshire, it cannot be said to be at all frequent in the south – western counties. In the extreme north of England it is fairly represented; but it has crossed the border in scanty numbers, and though scattered about Scotland it has obtained no great hold. It is supplemented by Woods in Lancashire, Norfolk, Suffolk, etc.”.

Early Bearers of the Surname
The earliest known bearer of this surname was Walter de la Wode who was documented in the Fines Court in 1242 AD. A one Adam le Wode was recorded in Worcestershire in 1221 AD. The Hundred Rolls of 1273 AD, a census of Wales and England, known in Latin as Rotuli Hundredorum lists three bearers of this surname: Andrew ate Wode in county Oxfordshire, Richard de la Wode county Oxforfshire, and Elias in le Wode in county Cambridgeshire. A one Walter de la Wode was recorded in the county Herefordshire who lived during the reign of Henry III and Edward I and was documented in the Testa de Neville sive Liber Feodorum. The Poll Tax of Yorkshire in 1379 AD lists three bearers of this last name: Robertus del Wodde, Thomas del Wode, and Robertus del Wode. An early baptism involving this surname was Judy Wode, who was baptized in 1549 at St. Margaret’s church, Westminster, and Margaret, the daughter of John Wood.

Clan Wood of Scotland
Clan Wood is a Lowland Scottish clan from North Esk, in Largo Bay near Angus in Scotland. Their historic seat is Largo Castle and their crest is a ship under sail proper, with the motto Tutus in Undis, meaning “Safe on the waves”. One of the prominent members of this clan was Admiral Sir Andrew Wood of Fife who was born in the mid-1400s AD, the son of a merchant named William Wood, who was employed to protect Scottish trade with Holland by King James III. He also fought at the Battle of Sauchieburn, a conflict fought between King James II of Scotland and a rebellious noble led by Alexander Holme and Price James, Duke of Rothesay.

George Fraser Black’s 1946 book, The Surnames of Scotland, states the following in regard to this surname: “William Wod was a witness to the valuation of Kilravock and Easter Geddes in 1295. In 1370 John Wode complained of having been plundered by wreckers. Ade Wood in Garvald and Roger Wode in Louchurde were tenants under Douglas, 1376. A horse was stolen from Adam dictus Wode, husbandman of the bishop of Moray, 1398, and Hugo o’ the Wode, ‘scocheman,’ had a royal pardon, 1407. William de le Wod is in record, 1413. Thomas Wod, a witness in Newbattle, 1458. Patrick of Wod witnessed an instrument of sasine, 1476, and Thom of Wod witnessed a declaration by John of Roule, 1479. John Vode was a friar preacher in Aberdeen, 1486, and Alexander Woyd was a tenant under the bishop of Glasgow, 1513”.

History, Genealogy, and Ancestry
A one Oliver Wood was born in Collingtree, England in 1462 AD. He married Johanna Cantelupe and they had a daughter together named Margaret (Wood) Mantell. Ernald de Bosco was born in Thorpe Ernald Leiceshireshire. He married Joan De Beauchamp and had two issue with her: Joan De Beauchamp and Ernald Du Bois.

The famous genealogist Bernard Burke’s book “The Landed Gentry” discusses twelve branches of this family: 1) Wood-Martin of Woodville, 2) Wood of Hollin Hall, 3) Wood of Littleton, 4) Wood of Newton Hall, 5) Wood of Ottershaw Park, 6) Wood of Bishop’s Hall, 7) Wood of Osmington, 8) Wood of Singleton Lodge, 9) Wood of Thoresby, 10) Wood of Stout Hall, Wood of the Whitehouse, 11) Wood of Thedden Grange, and 12) Wood of Raasay. Extensive Wood genealogy and pedigree is given for each, but we will briefly summarize the information of the ancestry of these Wood families, and their armorial bearings, as several of these families are armigerous.

The first branch begins with a mention of William Gregory Wood-Martin, Esquire of Woodville in county Sligo who was Justice of the Peace, High Sheriff in 1877, and Captain of the Duke of Connaught’s Sligo Artillery Militia, and Lieutenant of the 44th Regiment. He was born in 1847, and in 1873, he married Frances Dora, daughter of Roger Dodwell Robinson of Garden Hill, and had three issue with her: James Idisore, Henry Roger Bromhead, and Gregory Conville Cuff. Burke traces the Wood genealogy to a county York family. The first member who became established in Ireland was Cornet Thomas Wood, Captain Morgan’s Troop in Colonel Richard Coote’s regiment of horse in 1649. He obtained sizeable land grants at Castle Laccean and Castle Connor, in the Barony of Tireagh, as well as in the parish of Kilmaeteige, Barony of Liney, county Sligo. He married a daughter of Venerable Robert Brown. The Wood Coat of Arms was blazoned in heraldry as follows: Quarterly, 1st and 4th, sable a chevron between three crescents argent, for Martin, 2nd and 3rd, argent, an oak tree fructed growing out of a mound in base all proper in the dexter chief point a crescent gules, for Wood.

The second branch begins with a mention of Frederick Henry Wood, Esquire of Hollin Hall and Copmanthrope in county York, who was Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant. He was born in 1811, and in 1840, he married Charlotte Augusta, daughter of John Rothery of Leeds, and had three children with her: Albert Charles (born 1841, Captain of the 8th Hussars), Henry Richard Hugh (born 1847, Royal Navy), and Eliza Rose (married Howland Hill Fawcett, Esq.).  Burke traces the lineage of this family back to Giles Wood, an Esquire of Pickering, of county York, who lived in around 1500 AD. He had a son named Richard, who married Izabel, daughter of Hugh Hilton of Slingsby, and from them descended Anthony Wood, Esquire of Durham. The Wood Family Crest was blazoned as follows: Azure, three woodmen proper, each armed with  club over the right shoulder and a shield in front argent, thereon a cross gules, head and waist encircled with a wreath vert all standing on ground of the second, with a crest that is an oak tree proper, charged with acorns or.

The third branch begins with a mention of Thomas Wood, Esquire of Littleton, Middlesex, at Middleham Castle in county York, and in Gwernyfed in county Brecon, who was Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant. He was born in 1853 and was also Lieutenant of the Grenadier Guards. Burke states this family is one of great antiquity. Thomas Wood, Esquire of Ranger of Bushery Park, 1664 to 1723, son of Edward, an Alderman of London, married Dorothy, daughter of Sir Robert Dice, and had issue with her: Edward, Thomas, and Thomas. The Wood Coat of Arms was blazoned as follows in heraldry: Quarterly, 1st and 4th, sable, a bull passant argent, for Wood, 2nd and 3rd, argent a chevron between three cocks gules, on a chief sable, as many spearheads of the first sanguinated for William.

The fourth branch begins with a mention of Isaac Moreton Wood, Esquire of Newton Hall in count Chester, who succeeded his father in 1865. Burke traces the genealogy or pedigree of this line back to the Venerable Isaac Wood, Archdeacon of Chester of Newton Hall, Cheshire, son of Isaac Wood and Annabella Wilson, who in 1824 married Mary, daughter of John Nugent of Clayhill, and had four issue with her: Isaac Moreton (already mentioned above), John Nugent (married Susanna Lapham), Edmund Burke (married Elizabeth Dicken), and Thomas Charles (died 1864). The family had the following heraldic blazon: Argent, a wolf salient sable.

The fifth branch begins with a mention of George Wood, Esquire, formerly of Ottershaw Park, Surrey, now of Feltwell Lodhe, Norfolk, and Westercombe in Hans, who is considered to be a representative of the ancient Wood family (clan) of Largo, in Fife, Scotland, who in 1847, married Alexandrina Williamson, daughter of Angus McLeod, Esquire and had four children with him: Alexander Keith, Andrew George (1854), Frances Geogina, and Alisa Flora. Burke traces the lineage of this family back to Sir Andrew, the brave/loyal Admiral of Kings James III and James IV of Scotland in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth century. His grandson was James Wood of Lamblethame, who married Janet Balfour, and they had a son together named Alexander. This Alexander married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir David Wemyss of Bogie. Their descendant was Reverend Alexander Wood, an Episcopolian clergyman. He married Jean Brown, daughter and heir of Reverend Robert Kett of Cessford, and had the following children with her: Robert (the Under Secretary of State for Scotland), George, William (married a member of the Stuart family of Ardnamurchan, and Mark (married Jean, daughter of W. Mercer of Potterhill). The Wood Family Crest has the following blazon in heraldry: Argent, an oak tree eradicated proper.

The sixth branch begins with a mention of William Mark Wood, Esquire of Bishop’s Hall in Essex, who was Justice of the Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, High Sheriff of county Monmouth, and Lieutenant General of Coldsream Guards who was born in 1817. In 1846, he married Amelia Jane, sister of Sir Richard B. Williams Bulkeley and he had three issue with her: Amelius Richard Mark (born 1847, married Isabella Mary Milbanke), William Robert Percival (1851, married 1876 to Charity Catherine Cotton), and Amy Rachel. He assumed the name wood in 1838, in compliance with the will of his maternal uncle, Sir Mark Wood, Baronet. Burke traces the lineage back to a family of Lockwood derived from the placename in county Stafford. An early member was Richard Lockwood who was born in 1672 and was a Member of Parliament from Hinton, Worcester, and London.

The seventh branch begins with a mention of Edward Atkyns Wood, Esq. of Osmington House, Dorset, Justice of Peace, Deputy Lieutenant, and Major of the Dorset Militia who was born in 1810. In 1835, he married Francis Maria Dale, daughter of Colonel Hervey Smith of Aspley House, and he later married Anna Isabella, daughter of Reverend James Grasset.

The eighty branch begins with a mention of William Rayner Wood, Esq. of Singleton Lodge in county Lancaster, Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant who was born in 1811. In 1841, he married Sarah Jane, daughter of James McConell, Esq. of Manchester, and had a son with her named George William Rayner, born in 1851 who was Captain of the 40th Lancashire Rifle Volunteers, as well as a Justice of the Peace for the county. William later married Isabel Theophila, daughter of Reverend Henry Duntze. Burke traces the lineage back to Benjamin Wood, Gentlemen of Northampton, who was born in 1718. In 1741, he married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Wingreave, and had a son with her named Reverend William Wood of Leeds.  The Wood Family crest was blazoned as follows: Argent, on a chief sable an open Bible proper clasped on between two mill-rinds, of the first.

The ninth branch begins with a mention of Willoughby Wood, Esquire of Thoresby in county Lincoln, and Hollyhurst in county Stafford, who was born in 1856 and was a Captain of the 1st Stafford Militia. Burke traces the genealogy back to Chares Wood, Esq. of Thoresby, son of John and Mary, who married Ann, daughter of Sir Willoughby Hickman, and had a son and successor with her named Willoughby Wood. The Wood coat of arms was blazoned as follows in heraldry: Gules, a fess cotised between three lions erased crowned or.

The tenth branch begins with a discussion of Mary Catherine Wood of Stout Hall, county Glamorgan, Wales, who was daughter and heiress of Colonel John Nicholas Lucas. In 1843, she married Colonel Edward Robert Wood. Burke states the family descends from a common ancestor with Lucas, of Shenfield Essex. John Lucas, Esquire of Stouthall was High Sheriff of the county in 1778, the son of Henry Lucas. He had a son named John Lucas. Burke does not provide a blazon for this family.

The eleventh branch begins with a mention of Herbert Howorth Wood, Esquire of the Whitehouse, Herts, who was Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant, who was born in 1834. In 1867, he married Alice Wyatt, daughter of Samuel Carrington, and had five children with her: William Howorth, Ernest Hardwick, Herbert Audley, Louisa Frances Haselden, and Eveline Alice. Burke traces the genealogy or pedigree back to William Wood, Esquire, Justice of the Peace, and Deputy Lieutenant who was born in October 1758, the son of Nicholas Wood and Anne Seward. The Wood Family Crest is blazoned as follows: Or, a cross-crosslet gules.

The twelfth branch begins with a mention of John Gathorne Wood of Thedden Grange, Alton, Hants, who was born in 1839. He was Justice of the Peace for Hants, and in 1839, he married Susan Mary, daughter of Edward Penefather of Rathsalla, and had two daughters with her: Evelyn Emily (1863) and Edith Susan Mary (1864). He later married the Honorable Mary Anne Hewitt, daughter of James, 4th Viscount of Lifford, and had four issue with her: Archibald Henry, Ernest Gathorne, Wilfird Edward, and Gertrude Mary. He was the eldest son of John Wood (born 1791). Burke does not give a heraldic blazon for this family.

The thirteenth branch begins with a mention of Edward Herbert Wood, Esquire of Raasay, Isle of Raasay, and Newbold Revel, county Warwick, Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant for county Inverness and Justice of the Peace for Warwick. He was born in 1847 and in 1869, he married Evelyn Anne, daughter of Major-General Valiant, and had six issue with her: Arthur Herbert Edward (1870), John Lockhart (1871), Evelyn Cecily, Mary Ethel, Constance Islay, and Helen Grace. He was the son of Edward Wood of Newbold Revel. Burke does not mention a coat of arms for this family.

Early Immigration Records for the Wood Surname & Early Americans and New World Settlers bearing the Wood Last Name
Thomas Wood, age 35, came to Virginia aboard the George in 1620.
Percevall Wood came to Virginia aboard the George in 1620.
Abraham Wood, age 10, came to Virginia aboard the Margaret & John in 1620.
John Wood, age 26, came to Virginia aboard the Bonaventure in January 1634.
Elizabeth Wood, age 28, came to New England aboard the Increase in April 1635.
Symon Wood, age 14, came to Barbados aboard the Alexander in May 1635.
John Wood, age 22, came to St. Christopher’s aboard the Mathew in May 1635.
Constunt Wood, age 12, came to New England aboard the Abigall in June 1635.
Richard Wood, age 36, came to Virginia aboard the American in June 1635.
Anne Wood, age 23, came to New England aboard the Defense in July 1635.
Leonard Wood, age 22, came to Virginia board the Paule in July 1635.
Henrie Wood, age 20, came to Virginia aboard the Assurance in July 1635.
William Wood, age 27, came to New England aboard the Hopewell in September 1635, along with Elizabeth and Joseph, assumedly his relatives.
Patrick Wood, age 25, came to Virginia aboard the Abraham in 1635.
Thomas Wood, age 23, came to Barbados aboard the Expedition in November 1635.

In 1623 in Virginia, Thomas Wood lived “in the maine”, Percivall Wood live “over the river”, Abram Wood lived “at y Plantacon at James Cittie”, and Henry Wood lived “at y Plantacon at James Cittie”. In the same year the following people were listed as dead: John Wood at “Colledg”. In the parish of St. Michael’s in the Barbados,  a one Andrew Wood was buried in May of 1678. A one Francis Wood and his wife, who had one child and four slaves, were documented as living in the town of St. Michael’s in the Barbados in 1680.

Other early settlers in colonial America bearing the Wood surname include Anne (Virginia 1700), Amy (Virginia 1704), Alexander (Carolina 1707), Awbray (Pennsylvania 1726), and Elizabeth (Georgia in 1735). One of the earliest settlers in Canada with this last name was a widow named Wood, who with her issue, arrived in Quidi Vidi, Newfoundland in 1676. In Australia, one of the earliest settlers with this name was George Wood, a convict from York, England, who arrived in 1817 aboard the Almorah and lived in New South Wales, which was a penal colony on the east of Australia. One of the earliest settlers on New Zealand bearing the name was Pelig Wood, who in 1830, arrived at the Bay of Islands, which is an enclave of over 140 subtropical islands bear the nation’s northern island.

Early Americans Bearing the Wood Family Crest
Charles Bolton’s American Armory, published in 1927, contains three entries for the surname Wood:

1) Arg on a mount ppr a wolf stat in front of an oak tree. Crest: out of a mural crown a demi-savage wreathed about the temples and waist with oak leaves, the sinister hand holding a club erect and in the dexter an oak tree eradicated. Motto: Perseverando. Bookplate Frank Wood, Boston. E. B. Bird, des.
2) Az an oak tree on a mound ppr bet a 3-masted ship in the dexter and sinister quarters. Crest: a ship with main and mizzen mast main sails furled. Motto: Tutus in undis. Bookplate W. Wood, Prest. Bd. of Educ., N. Y. City. R. Gray, sc.
3) Or on a mound vert a wolf star sa under an oak tree vert. Crest: from a mural crown a demiman holding in the dexter hand a grifin’s head erased sa and in the sinister a club sa (?). Bookplate Col. Joseph Wood, Revolutionary Army.

Crozier’s General Armory lists two Wood family members with arms. The first is William Wood of Lynn, Massachusetts in 1631. It notes he was from Matlock, Derbyshire. The blazon is as follows: Azure, three naked savages proper each holding in the dexter hand a shield argent, charged with a cross gules, and in the sinister a club resting on the shoulder likewise proper, with the crest being an oak tree proper acorned or. The second is Mrs. August Wood of Bridgeport, Connecticut, who bore the same arms of Sergeant Francis Nichols of Stratford, CT: Azure a fess between three lions’ heads erased or.

Interestingly, Matthew’s American Armoury and Blue Book, does not contain entries for Wood Family Crests, but it does contain numerous blazons for surname that have the word wood as their prefix or suffix.

Mottoes
We have identified 17 Wood family mottoes:
Perseverando (By persevering) (meaning Wood of Barnsley)
Defend or Defend the right (Wood of Boneytown, also Wood of Gloucester)
Tutas in undis (Safe on Waves)
Irrideo tempestatem (I laugh at the storm) (Wood of Mount House)
Credo cruce Christi (I trust in the cross of Christ)
Civil and religious liberty (Wood of Singleton Lodge)
Strenue et audacter (Boldly and earnestly)
Deus robur meum (God is my strength) (from the Book of Isaiah) (Wood of Brownhills)

Pro patria (For my country) (Wood of Holm Hull)
Fructu cognoscitur arbor (A tree is known by its fruit)
Die virescit (It attains vigour by time) (Wood of Grangehaugh)
Suaviter sed fortiter (Softly, but strongly)
Virtute et labore (By valour and exertion)
Omne bonum Dei donum (Every good gift of God)
Veritas vincit (Truth prevails)
Pariae fidelis (Faithful to my country)
Strenue et audacter (Strenuously and daringly)
Hinc fortior et clarior (Hence the stronger and more illustrious)

Grantees
We have 104 coats of arms for the Wood surname depicted here. These 104 blazons are from Bernard Burke’s book The General Armory of England, Ireland, and Scotland, which was published in 1848. The bottom of this page contains the blazons, and in many instances contains some historical, geographical, and genealogical about where coat of arms was found and who bore it. People with this last name that bore a Wood Coat of Arms include:

1) of Leonard Stanley, county Gloucestershire, 1759
2) of Shrewsbury, Clarendon, Jamaica, 1767
3) Francis, Baronet, 1784, of Barnsley in county York, 1784
4) Sir Charles Wood, Baronet. Supporters, G.C.B. , 1856, Viscount Halifax (1866)
5) Wood to Watson, William of county York (maternal uncle, George Watson) (1803)
6) of Broomfield, Manchester, county Lancashire, and Macclesfield, county Chester, 1809
7) of Bath, county Somerset, 1810
8) Lieutenant Colonel, George (?) 1815
9) Lieutenant Colonel Samuel Wood, 1815
10) Wood, late Walker, of London, 1817
11) Wood-Davison, Thomas, of county York, 1818
12) Wood of Singleton Lodge, Prestwich, county Lancashire, and Leeds, county York, 1833
13) John, of Brownhills, Burslem, county Stafford
14) Edward Wood, Justice of the Peace of Burslem and Port Hill, Wolstanton, county Staffordshire, 1861
15) Sir Mathew Wood, Baronet, 6 December 1837, of Hatherley, county Gloucestershire, and Exeter and Tiverton, county Devon, 1837, Baron Hatherley, his 2nd son, Supporters, 1868
16) late Lockwood, of county Essex, Cambridgeshire, and Surrey, 1838
17) of Northumberland, 1838
18) Wood-Craster, of county Northumberland, 1838
19) Wood, of Thedden Hampshire, and Horton, Bradford, and county York, 1839 (?)
20) Wood to Watson, John Webster, of county Sussex and York, 1830
21) Richard Wood, Consul at Damascus, 1847
22) Wood, after Edwards, of county Warwickshire, 1851
23) Wood to Pengarves, minor, of county Cornwall, 1860
24) to Stuckey, Vincent, of county Bedfordshire and Somerset, 1861
25) Sir Richard Henry Wood, F.S.A, of Crumpsall, Manchester, county Lancashire , and Northen, county Chester, 1871
26) Wood-Action, Augustus, of Shropshire, 1874
27) Wood to Shuckburgh, Richard Henry, of county Warwick, 1876
28) Samuel Wood of Talbot House in Whitfield, county Derby, son of John, 1878
29) Albert Wood, Justice of the Peace, of Bodlondel in county Carnarvon, Wales, and to the other descendants of his late father, Henry Wood, late of the City of Chester, 25 February 1880
30) Wood-Besly, E.H., of Kensington Square, London, 1890
31) Joseph Snell Wood, of 29 Kensington Court, London, 1898

Notables
There are hundreds of notable people with the Wood surname. This page will mention a handful. Famous people with this last name include: 1) Natalie Wood (1938-1981), an American actress known for her roles in several famous movies (ex. Miracle of 34th Street, Rebel Without a Cause) from San Francisco whose birth name was Natalia Nikoleavna Zakharenko, 2) Leonard Wood (1860-1927) who was an army officer in the United States who became Chief of Staff for the US Army, Governor General of the Philippines, and Governor of Cuba, 3) Peter Atte Wood (1325-1382) who was a Justice in Eyre, highest magistrate in a medieval forst, for the south of Trent, England, 4) Samuel Newitt Wood (1825-1891) who was an American attorney who became active in politics in the territory of Kansas, 5) Thomas John Wood (1823-1906) who was an officer in the United States army from Kentucky, who served as a Union general in the American Civil War, as well as the Mexican-American Bar, 6) Thomas Ernest Woods Jr. (1972) who is an American historian, political pundit, and author from Massachusetts known for his libertarianism and Catholicism, 7) Wilbur Forrester Wood Jr. (1941) who was an American baseball  player known for his knuckleball who spent most of his career with the Chicago White Sox, 8) Garfield Arthur Wood (1880-1971) who was an American businessman and investor known for building and racing motorboats and holding speed records, 9) Elizabeth Armstrong Wood (1912-2006) who was an American geologist and crystallographer from New York City who contributed to the development of lasers and superconducted through her research at Bell Laboratories, 10) John Christopher Wood (1901-1930) who was an English painter from a city near Liverpool, and 11) Edwin Carlyle Wood (1929-2001) who was an Austrian gynaecologist known for pioneering IVD (in-vitro-fertilisation).

Wood Family Gift Ideas

Browse Wood family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Viscount Halifax). Az. three naked savages ambulant in fess ppr. in the dexter hand of each a shield ar. charged with a cross gu. in the sinister a club resting on the shoulder also ppr. on a canton erm. three lozenges conjoined in fess sa. Crest—A savage as in the arms, the shield sa. charged with a griffin's head erased ar. Supporters—On either side a griffin sa. gorged with a plain collar and pendent therefrom a portcullis or. Motto—Perseverando.
2) (Hatherley House, co. Gloucester, bart.). Quarterly, ar. and or, the mace of the Lord Mayor of London in pale betw. an oak tree on a mount vert fructed ppr. in the 1st and 4th quarter, and in the 2nd and 3rd a bull's head erased sa. charged on the neck with a bezant. Crest—Out of a mural crown ar. a demi wild man wreathed about the temples with oak fructed, in the dexter hand an oak tree eradicated and fructed, and in the sinister a club, all ppr. Motto—Defend.
3) (Baron Hatherley). Same Arms. Crest—Out of a mural crown ar. a demi wild man wreathed about the temples with oak, in the dexter hand an oak tree eradicated and fructed, and in the sinister a club, all ppr. Supporters—On either side a wild man wreathed about the temples and waist with oak, across the shoulder a wreath of ivy and holding a club all ppr. Motto—Defend the right.
4) (Gatton Park, co. Surrey, bart., extinct). Ar. a tree eradicated and erect ppr. Crest—An oak tree eradicated ppr. fructed vert. Supporters—On either side a sailor, caps and jackets vert, cuffs, lappels, trousers, and waistcoats ar. Motto—Tatas in undis.
5) (Thomas Wood, Chief Justice of Common Pleas in England, 1501). Gu. semee of crosses crosslet fitchee ar. three demi woodmen holding clubs ppr., quartering Cantrell, viz., Ar. a pelican in her piety sa.
6) (co. Bedford). Ar. on a fess vert a bull pass. or.
7) (co. Brecknock). Ar. an oak tree ppr.
8) (Fulborne, co. Cambridge, andSneterley, co. Norfolk). Sa. a bull pass. ar. Crest—A demi lion ramp. or, gorged with a wreath az. and gu. tied behind with two bows.
9) (Newton, near Middlewich, co. Chester). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a pile az. three martlets of the field, a chief of the second, for Wood; 2nd and 3rd, ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three square buckles sa. tongues pendent, a crescent, or, for Moreton. Crest—A falcon ar. close, jessed and belled or, standing on a lure ppr.
10) (Newton Hall, co. Chester). Ar. a wolf salient sa.
11) (Swanwick, co. Derby, temp. Henry VII.). Az. three naked naked savages ppr. each holding in the dexter hand a shield ar. charged with a cross gu. and in the sinister a club resting on the shoulder likewise ppr. Crest—An oak tree ppr. acorned or.
12) (Harestow, co. Devon; John Wood, Esq., of Harestow, son of Richard Wood, alias At Wood, of same place. Visit. Devon, 1620). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a mount in base ppr. an oak tree vert, fructed or; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a hull’s head erased sa., for Carslake. Crest—A demi wild man holding in the dexter hand ppr. an oak tree eradicated vert, fructed or.
13) (Lewtrenchard, co. Devon; John Wood, Esq., of Lewtrenchard, temp. James I., son of Thomas Wood, and grandson of John Wood, both of same place. Visit. Devon, 1620). Sa. semee of crosses crosslet or, three leopards' faces of the last.
14) (North Taunton, co. Devon). Sa. three bars or, on a canton gu. a demi woodman holding a club over the dexter shoulder or. Crest—A woodman ppr. wreathed about the temples and loins and holding in the dexter hand an olive branch all vert.
15) (co. Devon; quartered by Monck, Duke of Albemarle. Visit. Devon, 1620). Ar. a chev. betw. three bulls’ heads cabossed sa.
16) (co. Devon). Ar. a tree vert, on a chief az. three trefoils slipped or.
17) (co. Devon). Sa. three bars or, on a canton gu. a demi woodman erased holding on the shoulder a club of the second. Crest—A woodman, in the dexter hand an oak slip, in the sinister a club resting over the shoulder all ppr.
18) (Osmington House, co. Dorset). Gu. a spear and human leg in armour couped at the thigh, both paleways. Crest—An arm embowed in armour, the hand grasping a spear paleways.
19) (Mount House, co. Durham). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a mount vert an oak tree fructed ppr., for Wood; 2nd, az. on a fess erm. three crosses crosslet fitchée gu., for Bomford; 3rd, sa. a lion ramp. erm. betw. three crosses crosslet fitchée or, for King, Crest—On a mount vert an oak tree fructed ppr. Motto—Irrideo tempestatem.
20) (Hetton, co. Durham). Same Arms, a martlet for diff. Crest and Motto, as the last.
21) (Bishop’s Hall, co, Essex). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a tree eradicated and erect ppr.; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a fess betw. three martlets sa. Crests—1st: An oak tree eradicated ppr.; 2nd: A martlet on the stump of an oak tree branched all ppr. Motto—Tutus in undis.
22) (Nottsgrove, co. Essex, and Lincoln’s Inn, London). Or, on a pile az. three martlets of the fleld. Crest—On a lure ar. caped and lined or, a falcon close gold.
23) (Stapleford, co. Essex). Or, on a bend gu. three chaplets of the field.
24) (co. Essex). Ar. a fess gu. within two barrulets az. betw. three lions' heads erased sa.
25) (Brockthorp, co. Gloucester). Ar. a chev. engr. betw. three fleurs-de-lis gu.
26) (Cirencester, co. Gloucester; Rev. Henry Wood, B.A.). Ar. a chev. engr. sa. betw. three fleurs-de-lis gu. Crest—An arm in pale, habited chequy or and sa. cuffed ar. in the hand ppr. a fleur-de-lis gu.
27) (Leonard Stanley, co. Gloucester, 1759). Ar. on a chev. engr. sa. betw. three fleurs-de-lis gu. as many bezants.
28) (The Whitehouse, co. Hereford). Or, a cross crosslet gu. Crest—A cubit arm crect, vested or, cuffed ar. holding in the hand ppr. a cross crosslet gu. Motto—Credo cruce Christi.
29) (Sandwich, co. Kent; arms confirmed and crest granted 20 Nov. 1574, by Cooke, Clarenceux, to Edward Wood, of Sandwich). Sa. on a chev. betw. three oak trees eradicated or, as many martlets of the field. Crest—An arm embowed habited in green leaves, the hand and elbow ppr. holding a broken spear in three pieces, one in pale and two in saltire ppr.
30) (Wateringbury, co. Kent, and Hamsey, co. Sussex). Ar. on a fess ragulée az. three fleurs-de-lis or. Crest—A dexter gauntlet gu. erect and purfled or, betw. two ostrich feathers ar.
31) (co. Lancaster, 1582). Or, on a mount voit a wolf statant sa. under a tree ppr. Crest—Out of a mural coronet ar. a demi woodman ppr. wreathed about tho loins and temple vert, holding a griffin’s head erased in the dexter hand, and supporting a club in the other hand over the left shoulder also ppr.
32) (Singleton Lodge, co. Lancaster). Ar. on a chief sa. an open Bible ppr. clasped or, betw. two millrinds of the first. Crest—A boar pass. reguard. sa. collared, chained, and hoofed or, in front of a tree ppr. Motto—Civil and religious liberty.
33) (co. Lancaster). Sa. a chief gu. over all a lion ramp. ar.
34) (Thoresby, co. Lincoln). Gu. a fess cotised betw. three lions' heads erased ar. crowned or. Crest—A lion's head erased and crowned. Motto—Strenue et audacter.
35) (Lincoln’s Inn, London; granted 1586). Or, on a pile az. three martlets of the first, a chief of the second. Crest—A hawk close ar. beaked, jessed, and belled or, standing on a lure ppr.
36) (London). Ar. a wolf salient sa. collared or, on a chief az. three bezants. Crest—A wolf's head erased sa. collared gu. rimmed or.
37) (London, and Enfield, co. Middlesex; descended from Woodborough, co. Nottingham). Gu semée of crosses crosslet fitchée ar. three demi savages with clubs elevated ppr. a sinister canton az. charged with as many fleurs-de-lis or, a fleur-de-lis for diff. Crest—On a mount vert an oak ppr. fructed or.
38) (Islington, co. Middlesex; granted Feb. 1606). Ar. a wolf pass. sa. a chief gu. Crest—Out of a mural coronet gu. a wolf's head sa. collared ar.
39) (Hackney, co. Middlesex; confirmed 20 June, 1634). Sa. a chief gu. over all a lion ramp. ar.
40) (Staple Inn, co. Middlesex; from co. Kent; granted 6 May, 1613). Ar. on a fess ragulée az. three fleurs- de-lis or, in chief a trefoil slipped vert. Crest—A gauntlet erect gu. garnished or, betw. two laurel branches vert.
41) (Norwich, co. Norfolk). Per pale ar. and sa. on a chev. betw. three martlets as many trefoils slipped all counterchanged. Crest—A martlet, wings expanded ar. holding in the beak a tulip ppr. stalked and leaved vert.
42) (Berwick, co. Northumberland; impalement Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1636, Captain John Pikeman, of Dnblin, whose wife was Jane, dau. of Edward Wood, of Berwick, gent.). Ar. three bars sa. on a canton gu. a demi wild man, the dexter hand extended holding an oak branch and the sinister holding a club over the shoulder all ppr. a crescent for diff.
43) (Beadnell, co. Northumberland). Az. on a bend ar. three fleurs-de-lis sa. each charged with as many bezants. Crest—A wolf's head sa. erased or, gorged with a collar of the last, charged with three annulets gu.
44) (co. Nottingham). Gu. three demi woodmen in fess betw. nine crosses crosalet (another, crosses crosslet fitchée) or. Crest—An oak tree ppr. fructed or.
45) (Woodborough and Nether Colwick, co. Nottingham. Visit. Notts, 1614). Gu. semée of crosses crosslet fitchée ar. three demi woodmen, on a sinister canton az. as many fleurs-de-lis or. (N.B.—The augmentation of the canton was granted by Harvey, Clarenceux, for the taking of a Frenchman). Quartering Chantrell, Ar. a pelican in her piety sa.; Story, gu. on a fess ar. three crosses pattée of the fleld; Colwick, Gu. three fusils conjoined in fess ar. in chief two cinquefoils or. Crest—An oak tree ppr. acorned or.
46) (co. Oxford). Ar. a lion ramp gu. on a chief of the last three oak branches of the first. Crest—A squirrel sejant holding in the paws a honeysuckle ppr.
47) (Brize Norton, co. Oxford, and Shynwood, co. Salop. Visit. Salop, 1623). Gu. three demi woodmen ar. each holding clubs over their dexter shoulders or. Crest—A demi woodman, as in the arms.
48) (co. Oxford, temp. Queen Elizabeth. Visit. Oxon, 1574). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. armed and langued az. on a chief of the second three acorns in fess slipped and leaved vert. Crest—A squirrel sejant sa. holding betw. the paws a honeysuckle ar. slipped and leaved vert.
49) (Codshall, co. Somerset). Or, a lion ramp sa. Crest— A demi lion ramp. purp. holding an acorn ppr.
50) (co. Somerset). Per chev. ar. and erm. a chev. sa. in chief two leopards’ faces gu.
51) (Hiltwood, co. Stafford). Ar. a lion ramp. purp. Crest—A demi lion ramp. purp. holding an acorn branch vert, fructed or.
52) (co. Stafford, and West Cutton and Thorp, co. York; arms and first crest granted 6 May, 1578). Sa. on a bend ar. three fleurs-de-lis of the field. Crest—A wolf's head erased sa. collared and ringed or. Another Creist—A demi lion ramp. ar.
53) (co. Stafford). Ar. a lion ramp. gu.
54) (co. Stafford). Ar. a wolf salient sa.
55) (Brownhills, co. Stafford; granted 1833, to John Wood, Esq., of Brownhills, who was son of John Wood, Esq., and Mary, his wife, dau. of Nicholas Price. Esq., of Pont-y-pandy, co. Glamorgan). Or, a lion ramp. betw. three boars’ heads erased sa. Crest—A demi man wreathed about tbe temples and waist with oak leaves fructed, the dexter hand holding a club in bend all ppr. the sinister arm extended, the hand grasping a wolf’s head erased sa. Motto—Deus robur meum.
56) (Ottershaw Park, co. Surrey). Ar. on oak tree eradicated ppr. Crest—A ship under sail, the especial badge of Wood, of Largo, co. Fife, having been added to the coat armorial of Sir Andrew Wood, in memory of his victory over the English fleet in 1480. Motto—Tutus in-undis.
57) (Lewes and West Godley, co. Sussex). Sa. a fess cotised betw. three lions’ heads erased ar. crowned or.
58) (co. Suffolk). Perpale or and sa. three eagles displ. counterchanged. Crest—On a ducal coronet or, an eagle, wings expanded perpale gold and sa.
59) (Woodcott, co. Warwick; quartered by Horne, of Stoke, co. Warwick). Ar. a chev. betw. three water bougets or.
60) (co. Warwick). Ar. a chev. betw. three bulls’ heads cabossed sa. armed or.
61) (co. Warwick). Ar. a fess gu. betw. three lions’ heads erased sa.
62) (cos. Warwick and Worcester). Ar. a fess betw. three leopards’ faces sa.
63) (Alfrick, co. Worcester). Gu. three demi woodmen ar. each holding a club or.
64) (Growtey, co. Worcester; arms at Staunton, on the tomb of Ann, dau. of Thomas Wood, of Growtey, and wife of Sir William Gresley, Knt., of Coulton, 1591). Sa. on a bend ar. three fleurs-de-lis of the field.
65) (city of Worcester; Thomas Wood, J. P., son of Basil Wood, Esq., was Mayor of Worcester 1745, d. 26 Aug. 1754, aged 60). Gu. three demi woodmen ar. each holding a club or. Crest—A demi woodman, as in the arms.
66) (co. York). Az. three woodmen in fess ppr. with clubs and targets or.
67) (Copmanthorpe, co. York; descended from Giles Wood, of Pickering, temp. Henry VIII; represented by Wood, of Hollin Hall, co. York). Az. three woodmen ppr. each armed with a club over the right shoulder and a shield in front ar. thereon a cross gu. head and waist encircled with a wreath vert, all standing on a ground ppr. Crest—An oak tree ppr. charged with acorns or. Motto—Pro patria.
68) (Hollin Hall, co. York). Az. three woodmen ppr. each armed with a clnb over the right shoulder and a shield in front ar. thereon a cross gu. head and waist encircled with a wreath vert, all standing on a ground ppr. Crest—An oak tree ppr. charged with acorns or. Motto—Pro patria.
69) (Colonel William Wood, C.B., 19 July, 1838). Erm. a chev. az. betw. three towers gu. on a chief embattled vert a sword erect betw. two leopards’ faces ppr. Crest—On an Eastern coronet or, a leopard pass. reguard. ppr. holding in the dexter paw a banner gu. staff and spearhead ppr.
70) Ar. an oak tree vert, fructed or. Crest—A demi wild man, on the shoulder a club, holding in the dexter hand an oak branch all ppr. wreathed about the middle vert.
71) Per pale or and sa. two eagles displ. counterchanged. Crest—On a ducal coronet or, an eagle per pale ar. and sa.
72) Ar. on a bend sa. three fleurs-de-lis of the first, in the sinister chief a crescent or, on a crescent gu. Crest—A wolf's head erased sa. collared or.
73) Gu. three demi woodmen ar. each holding a club in bend over the right shoulder betw. nine crosses crosslet of the second.
74) Ar. a fess gu. betw. three barons’ helmets az. crowned or.
75) Ar. an oak tree vert, acorned or, on a chief az. three trefoils slipped of the third.
76) Ar. a tree vert, on a chief az. three acorns slipped or.
77) Gu. a lion ramp. double queued ar.
78) Ar. two squirrels salient, incontrant, in fess gu. betw. nine crosses crosslet sa.
79) Ar. on a fess crenellee az. three fleurs-de-lis or.
80) Ar. a wolf salient sa. collared gu.
81) Az. three urchins pass. in pale or.
82) At. three lions’ heads erased az.
83) Ar. a wolf ramp. sa. collared or.
84) Sa. on a chev. or, betw. three pineapples of the second, as many martlets of the first.
85) Gu. on a bend ar. three leaves of the first.
86) Ar. three fleurs-de-lis gu.
87) Ar. a fess ragulée az. betw. three fleurs-de-lis gu.
88) Gu. a lion ramp. guard. ar.
89) (alias Deane). Ar. a lion ramp. purp.
90) (confirmed by Roberts, Ulster, 1647, to Mathew Wood, Captain of a ship of war, who served, 1639, at the Belief of Oporto, and in the Irish wars, temp. Charles I.). Ar. a lion sejant in a wood ppr. on a chief wavy gu. a harp betw. two anchors or. Crest—A cherub or.
91) (Woodville, co. Sligo; confirmed to James Wood, Esq., of Woodville, and to the descendants of his grandfather, James Wood, Esq., of Woodville). Ar. an oak tree fructed growing out of a mound in base all ppr. in the dexter chief point a crescent gu. Crest—A demi savage ppr. wreathed about the temples and loins vert, and charged on the breast with a crescent gu. holding in the dexter hand an oak tree fructed, and in his sinister a dub resting on his shoulder all also ppr. Motto—Fructu cognos citur arbor. See Martin.
92) (Balbegno, co. Forfar). Az. an oak tree growing out of a mount in base or, and on one of the branches are fastened two keys of the first by strappings gu. for the office of Thane of Fettercairn.
93) (Colpney, co. Aberdeen, 16th century). Az. an oak tree eradicated or.
94) (Craig, Scotland, 16th century). Az. an oak tree growing out of a mount in base or, a hunting-horn sa. stringed gu. hanging on one of the branches, all within a bordure engr. of the second.
95) (Bonnytown, co. Fife, bart.). Az. an oak tree or, growing out of a mount in base ppr. betw. two crosses crosslet fitchée of the second. Crest—A demi savage wreathed head and middle with laurel, holding a club erected in his dexter hand. Supporters—Two savages ppr. wreathed as the former, each with a baton erected on his right shoulder also ppr. Motto—Defend.
96) (Grangehaugh, Scotland; a scion of Bonnytown). Ar. an oak tree growing out of a mount in base ppr. betw. two crosses crosslet fitchée az. all within a bordure invected of the last. Crest—An oak slip fructed ppr. Motto—Diu virescit.
97) (Largo, co. Fife). Az. an oak growing ont of a mount in base or, betw. two ships under sail ar., as Admiral to James III. and James IV.
98) (Governor of the Isle of Man, 1775, said to be representative of Largo). Ar. an oak tree eradicated ppr. fructed or. Crest—A ship under sail ppr. Supporters—Two sailors ppr. in caps and jackets vert, their lapelles, cuffs, and trousers ar. Motto—Tutus in undis. The same Arms and Supporters were confirmed, in 1809, to Sir Mark Wood, of Gatton Park, co. Surrey, bart., and in 1845 to George Wood, of Potter’s Park, co. Surrey.
99) (Alexander Wood, Major 120th Regiment, 1795). Ar. an oak tree fructed growing out of a mount in base ppr. in chief a cross crosslet fitchée gu. betw. two eagles displ. sa. beaked and membered of the second. Crest—A demi woodman, in his dexter hand an olive branch, and in his sinister a club all ppr. Motto—Suaviter sed fortiter.
100) (Newbold Revel, co. Warwick; Raasay, Isle of Skye). Per fesse or and sa. a wolf ramp. counterchanged betw. two trees eradicated in chief ppr. Crest—A demi lion ramp. ar. semee of buckles sa. resting the sinister paw on a shield also sa. charged with a wolf's head erased ar. Motto—Virtute et labore.
101) (George Swinford Wood, Esq., and Albert Wood, Esq., of Bodlondeb, co. Carnarvon, J.P. and D.L.. High Sheriff, 1884, of an old co. Worcester family). Or, three mullets of six points in bend betw. two bendlets nebuly the whole betw. three roses all gu. Crest—In front of a mount thereon an oak tree fructed ppr. three bezants.
102) (Talbot House, Glossop, co. Derby; Samcel Wood, Esq., J.P., son of Samuel Wood, Esq., of same place). Sa. on a bend engr. ar. betw. two roses of the last barbed and seeded ppr. three fleur-de-lis gu. Crest—On a mount in front of an oak tree fructed, the trunk of a tree fessewise, eradicated and sprouting, all ppr. Motto—Omne bonum Dei donum.
103) (impaled by Osmand for Mary Jane, his wife, only child of Thomas Wood, Esq., of Bideford, co. Devon). Gu a cross betw. a demi man couped and afrontee holding over his dexter shoulder a club in the first quarter, an oak tree eradicated in the second, a bull’s head caboshed in the third, and a leopard’s face in the fourth, all or.
104) (Wood-Wright). (William Henry Edward Wood-Wright, Esq., of Golagh, co. Monaghan, J.P., D L., High Sheriff, 1877, only child of Rev. William Henry Wood-Wright, M.A., of Golagh, by Jane Elizabeth, his wife, only dau. of Nathaniel Stewart, Esq., of Shellfield, co. Donegal, and grandson of James Wood, Esq., Capt. 18th Regt., J.P., High Sheriff co. Monaghan, 1825, by Elizabeth Isabella, his wife, only dau. of William Cairnes Wright, Esq., of Golagh). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Wood-Wright: Az. on two bars engr. ar. three oak leaves vert, in chief as many leopards’ faces or; 2nd and 3rd, Stewart: Or a fesse chequy az. and ar. betw. in chief a thistle ppr. and in base a trefoil slipped vert a bordure gu. Crest—A cubit arm vested az. cuffed ar. charged with a leopard's face of the arms holding in the hand a broken tilting spear ppr. headed or. Motto—Veritas vincit.

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