Yong Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Yong Family Coat of Arms

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Yong Coat of Arms Meaning

Yong Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Yonge.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Yong. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Yong Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Yong blazon are the fusil, torteaux, griffin and bend. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and azure .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The fusil is a shape rather like a lozenge but taller and narrower, hence fusily refers to a field of similar shapes arranged in a regulat pattern. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fusil It is though that the shape originally derived from that of a spindle of yarn. Wade believes that the symbol is of very great age and quotes an earlier writer, Morgan who ascribes it the meaning of “Negotiation”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and torteau is a roundle gules, or red. (We must be careful however not to confuse this with the word in French heraldry, in which torteau means roundle and must have the colour specified.) Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 13Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]15Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Yong Name

Yong Origin:

England, Scotland

Origin of Yong:

The origin of this unusual surname originally evolved from an Anglo-Saxon before 7th-century origin and as such one of the oldest known origins. This name derived from the word ‘geong,’ which was introduced into the Middle English word ‘yunge or yonge,’ and ultimately means ‘The growing one’. Frequently, children of the same sex in a family often held the same name, and to recognized them a name would develop and be used especially for the younger holders of the introduction name. The word was also given as a love name for one who was ‘youthful from the heart,’ or arose young, as in the following example. The surname was first listed at the end of 13th century and changed into the new spelling formations which contain as Young, Younge, Youngs, Yong, Yonge and Ong(e). Early documentations consist that of Wilferd seo Iunge, (Wilfred the son of Young) in the 744 A.D. Anglo-Saxon registers, though this is not like a surname, whileRichard le Yunge of Lichfield, Staffordshire, in 1301, firmly suggests a nickname in detail which probably not have become hereditary. Next recordings derived from the parish records contain the wedding of Edmond Young and Katharyn Wendover in September 1568, at Sudbury, and the naming of George, son of William and Frances Young in October 1652 at St. James, in Clerkenwell, London. One of the oldest habitats in the communities of ‘New England’ was Nathaniell Young, who arrived at the Harbor of London, aboard the the ship ‘Constance,’ obligated for ‘Virginia’ in October 1635.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Young, Yeong, Eyoung, Yoong, Yongo, Yonga, Ayong, Oyong, Yongu, Yoeng.

England:

The surname Yong first organized in Essex, where the first documentation of the name appears in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as Wilfer seo lunga in 744. After many years, Walter was recorded in the premium Rolls for Sussex in 1296. Another detailed list Hugh le Yunge in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 as living in Oxfordshire. The same rolls record Ralph Younge in Staffordshire and after that William le Younge in Northumberland during the period of Edward I.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Walter Yonge, which was dated 1296, in the “premium Rolls of Sussex.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of The Scots,” dated 1272 – 1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the development of particular taxation. It came to be known as census Tax in England. Surnames all over the country started to develop, with different and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

People with the surname Yong had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Yong settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Yong who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Mary Yong, who came to Virginia in 1663. Alice Yong who settled in Virginia in 1664. Tho Yong, who arrived in Virginia in 1665. Thomas Yong, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1682. James Yong, who came to the Leeward Islands in 1695.

Some of the people with the name Yong who settled in the United States in the 19th century included John Yong, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1844. Robert Yong, who landed in Virginia in 1884.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Yong: China 1,492,853; Malaysia 151,920; South Korea 38,624; Singapore 22,479; Cambodia 12,507; Japan 10,220; Vietnam 6,955; Cameroon 4,559; United States 4,265; Taiwan 3,071.

Notable People:

Jang Yong, was a South Korean football player. He was born in the year 1945.

Ryoo Ryong, was a South Korean professor of chemistry. He was born in the year 1957.

Jim Yong Kim was born in Kim Yong in the year 1959. He was a South Korean-born American specialist and 12th administrator of the World Bank.

Lee Yong (luger), was a famous South Korean luger. He was born in the year 1978.

Kang Yong (born 1979), was a South Korean football player.

Lee Yong, was a South Korean football player. He was born in the year 1986.

Lee Yong, was a South Korean football player. He was born in the year 1989.

Yong Family Gift Ideas

Browse Yong family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (alias Youngrave) (Daventry, co. Northampton, and co. Hereford). Ar. on a bend betw. three dolphins sa. as many eagles displ. of the firat. Crest—A buck's head or.
2) Ar. on a bend sa. betw. two dolphins haurient and embowed or the second three eagles displ. of tho flrat. Crest—A stag’s head or.
3) Ar. on a bend betw. two cannons sa. three eagles displ. of the first, a canton or, charged with a rose gu.
4) (Hopperston, Scotland). Ar. on three piles in point sa as many annulets or, a chief gu. charged with a crescent betw. two mullets of the first.
5) (Auchen Castle, Dumfries, 1880). Motto—Tout prest. Ar. three piles in point sa. each charged with an annulet of the first, on a. chief gu. a crescent betw. two mullets also of the first. Crest—A dexter arm, the hand holding a lance headways ppr.
1) (co. Berks). Fusily or and vert, on a bend az. three bezants.
2) (Bristow). Fusily ar. and vert, on a bend az. three griffins' heads erased or
3) (co. Somerset). Fusily or and vert a bend gu.
4) (Morris Yong ap Jankin ap Mobcas ap Yerw: descended from Tudor Trevor, who was Earl of Hereford in right of his mother). Per bend sinister erm. and ermines a lion ramp. or.
5) (Medhurst, co. Sussex). Az. on a chev. betw. Three pelicans or, vulning themselves gu. as many escallops of the first. Crest—A demi griffin segreant reguard. az. beaked and legged or, a crescent for diff.
6) (John Yong, Bishop of Rochester 1578-1605; confirmed by Dethick, Garter, 1578). Per saltire az. and gu. a lion pass. guard, betw. two fleurs-de-lis in pale or.
7) (Thomas Yonge, Bishop of St. David's 1560, Arch bishop of York 1561, d. 1570). Per pale or and az. on a chev. ar. betw. three pelicans in their piety counterchanged, as many escallops gu.
8) (Richard Yonge, Bishop of Bangor 1400, translated to Rochester 1407, d. 141S). Per saltire az. and gu. a lion pass. guard. or.
9) (Philip Yonge, Bishop of Bristol 1758, translated to Norwich 1761, d. 1783). Or, three roses gu. barbed and seeded ppr.
10) (co. Berks). (Bassildon, co. Berks; granted 1607). Ar. on a chev. az. three bezants, on a chief gu. two cinquefoils or. Crest—Out of a mural crown gu. a goat's head or.
11) Lozengy or and vert, on a chief az. three bezants.
12) (Bassildon, co. Berks. Visit. Devon, 1620). (Colyton, co. Devon, bart., extinct 1810; descended from Walter Yonge, Esq., of Upper Helion, co. Devon, who was great-grandson of Walter Yonge, of Bassildon, co. Berks, temp. Henry. VII.; his son, Sir John Yonge, Bart., was so created 1661. Visit. Devon, 1620). Motto—Fortitudine et prudentia. Erm. on a bend cotised sa. three griffins' heads erased or. Crest—A boar's head erased at the neck vert, bristled or.
13) (co. Devon; granted by Camden, Clarenceux). Per fess sa. and ar. three lions pass, guard, counterchanged. Crest—A demi unicorn ar.
14) (Colbrooke, co. Devon, and Sturminstcr, co. Dorset; Robert Yonge, Esq., of Colbrooke, and of the Inner Temple, London, temp. James I., eldest son of Thomas Yonge, of Sturminster. Visit. Devon, 1620). Per fess sa. and ar. three lions ramp. guard. counterchanged. Crest—A demi sea unicorn ramp. ar. horned gu. finned or.
15) (Puslinch, co. Devon). (Axminster and Heltons, co. Devon). Motto—Qualis vita, finis ita. Or, six pellets in fess sa. betw. three lions ramp. gu. Crest—A buck's head couped betw. two fern branches all ppr.
16) (London). Bendy of six ar. and sa. a lion ramp. gu. Crest—A dragon's head erased or, ducally gorged ar.
17) (Kynton and More, co. Salop). Or, three roses gu. Crest—A wolf pass. sa.
18) (Charnes Hall, co. Stafford). Motto—Conservata fides perfectus amorque ditabunt. Az. a buck's head cabosaed or, on u chief sa. three mullets of the second. Crest—An antelope's head erased or, guttee de sang.
19) (Trent, co. Somerset; confirmed April, 1615). Or, three; roses gu. a canton of the second. Crest—A lion's head erased per fess or and gu. ducally crowned gold.
20) (co. Stafford). Az. a buck's head cabossed or, a chief sa.
21) (co. Wilts). Lozengy ar. and vert, on a bend az. three foxes' heads erased of the first.
22) (co. Wilts). Lozengy ar. and vert, on a bend az. two (another, one) ibexes' heads erased of the first, attired or.
23) (Metheley, co. York). Ar. on a chief gu. three lions ramp. guard. of the second. These arms were ascribed by some to Saxton.
24) (quartered by Marow or Marrow, of Berkeswell, co. Warwick). Ar. a chev. lozengy or and sa. betw. Three griffins' heads erased gu. on a chief vert a ducal coronet or, enclosed by two bezants.
25) Ar. on a bend sa. three griffins' heads erased paleways or. Crest—A stork ar. wings expanded az. holding in the beak a snake ppr.
26) Ar. a chev. componee counter-componee or and sa. betw. three griffins' heads erased gu. on a chief vert a ducal crown of the first enclosed by two bezants.
27) Az. three griffins segreant ar. armed gu.
28) Ar. three leopards ramp. gu. in chief a lion pass. of the first.
29) Ar. on a chief gu. three lions ramp, of the first.
30) Ar. three roses gu. seeded or.
31) Paly bendy of six ar. and vert, on a bend az. two unicorns' heads erased of the first.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fusil
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
15. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150