Click each Family Crest below

  • Buy Coat of Arms Image
  • Buy Coat of Arms T-shirt
  • Buy Coat of Arms Merch
  • Buy Genealogy Report
Buy Now

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Fillack, co. Cornwall, and Wellington, co. Somerset; Humphrey York, of Fillack, temp. James I., son of Thomas York, of Wellington, and grandson of Roger York, Serjeant-at-law, 1532. Visit. Cornwall, 1620). (Exeter, co. Devon). Gu. a chev. betw. three hinds’ heads erased ar.
2) (co. Devon). Ar. a fess nebulee az. betw. three crescents, within the horns of each a fleur-de-lis sa.
3) (Clothwood). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three fleurs-de-lis az.
4) (co. Somerset). Ar. on a fess sa. a crescent or, betw. two bezants.
5) (Goulthwayt, co. York, and co. Lincoln, 1665). Az. a saltire ar. Crest—A thistle ppr.
6) (Wighill Park, co. York). Erm. on a cross az. a woolpack ar. betw. four lions pass, erminois, on a chief gu. a sword ppr. pommel and hilt or, surmounted by a key in saltire of the last. Crest—A demi lion per fess wavy, the upper part gu. the lower barry wavy of four erminois and az. supporting a woolpack erect ppr. on the breast a gold key barways.
7) (John York was Sheriff co. Wilts temp. Edward IV.). Ar. on a saltire az. an escallop or.
8) Ar. a chev. sa. betw. three hinds’ heads couped gu.
9) Ar. on a fess cotised sa. a crescent of the first betw. two plates.
10) Per pale az. and ar. on each side a bend counterchanged.
11) (Earl of Hardwicke). Ar. on a saltire az. a bezant. Crest—A lion’s head erased ppr. collared gu. on the collar a bezant. Supporters—Dexter, a lion ramp. guard. or, collared gu. the collar charged with a bezant; sinister, a stag ppr. attired and unguled or, collared as the lion. Motto—Nec cupias, metuas.
12) (Baron Dover, extinct 1792; Gen. Sir Joseph Yorke, K.B., Aide-de-Camp to H.R.H. the Duke of Cumberland as Fontenoy, third son of Philip, first Earl of Hardwicke, was created, 1788, Baron Dover, d.s.p.). Same Arms and Crest, a mullet for diff. Supporters—Dexter, a lion or, gorged with a collar gu. charged with a bezant betw. two mullets sa.; sinister, a stag ppr. attired, unguled, and collared on the dexter. Motto—Nec cupias, nec metuas.
13) (Erddig, co. Denbigh; descended from Simon Yorke, younger brother of Philip Yorke, of Dover, the father of Philip, first Earl of Hardwick. He m. Anne, sister and heir of John Meller, Esq., of Erddig). Same Arms, quartering Meller. Crest—A lion’s head erased ppr. collared gu. charged with a bezant. Motto—Nec cupias, nec metuas.
14) (Gowthwaite, co. York; descended from Sir Richard Yorke. Knt. Mayor of the Staple in Calais). Ar. a saltire az. Crest—A monkey’s head erased ppr.
15) (Bewerey Hall, co. York). Same Arms. Crest—A monkey’s head erased ppr. There seems to have been a traditionary idea entertained that the monkey’s head was adopted in consequence of that animal having been first brought to England by a member of the Yorke family.
16) (co. Devon). Ar. a fess nebulée az. betw. three crescents within the horns of each a fleur-de-lis all sa. a border engr. of the last.
17) (co. Gloucester). Ar. on a saltire az. a bezant. Crest—A lion’s head erased ppr. collared gu. thereon a bezant.
18) (Ashhy, co. Lincoln). Same Arms, a crescent for diff.
19) (Burton-Pedwardyn, co. Lincoln, and Brackley, co. Northampton). Az. a saltire ar. Crest—A monkey’s head ppr.
20) (Forthampton Court, co. Gloucester). Ar. on a saltire az. a bezant. Crest—A lion’s head erased ppr. collared gu. charged with a bezant. Motto—Sec cupias, nec metuas.
21) (Pensbury, co. Salop). Az. a saltire ar.
22) (James Yorke, Bishop of St. David’s 1774, translated to Gloucester 1779, and to Ely 1781; d. 1808). Ar. on a saltire az. a bezant.
23) (co. York). Ar. a saltire sa.
24) Ar. a fess sa. in chief a crescent of the last betw. two pellets.
25) Gu. on a fess cotised sa. a crescent or, betw. two bezants.
26) Ar. on a saltire az. a bezant, in chief a crescent gu. Crest—A lion’s head erased ppr. collared gu. charged with a bezant.
27) (Wynne-Yorke, Dyffryn Aled, co. Denbigh). Ar. on a saltire az. a bezant, quartering, 1st, for Wynne, of Garthewin, Quarterty, 1st and 4th, gu. three boars’ heads couped at the neck in pale, 2nd and 3rd, gu. a Saracen’s head couped at the neck ppr. wreathed about the temples ar. and sa.; 2nd, for Wynne, of Dyffryn Aled, Gu. a Saracen’s head couped at the neck ppr. wreathed about the temples ar. and sa.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and York Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Meaning, Origin, Etymology
(Anglo-Latin-Celt.) belonging to York, the Middle English Yorke, York, Domesday Euruic, Old Norse Ioruik, (Norse) One who came from York (Jvorvik), Anglo-Saxon Eoforwíc, Eoferwíc [eofor, -er(f as v), boar + wíc, place], Latin Eboracum, Eburacum (b prob. pron. nearly as v) = Eburos’s Estate [Eburacum is the Roman form of an O.Celt. *Eburacon (acc.), -ác-um, or -ác-on, being the common domanial or possess, suff.; while Ebur-os, Latinized Ebur-us, is a frequent Gaulish pers. name meaning ‘yew-tree’ (the yew was a sacred tree); cogn. with Gaelic and Irish iubhar, Old Irish ibar (whence the Irish pers. name Ibhar or Ivar), yew; Welsh efwr now means ‘ hedge ’], The Irish name is Ebroch, (English) One who came from York (place of yew trees), in Yorkshire. Yost (German) Descendant of Jodocus (fighter).  From the city of York in the north of England. The Romans called the city Eboracum; it is memorable for the death of two emperors, Severus and Constantius Chlorus, and for the nativity of Constantine the Great. And was the military captial of the Roman Britain, the captial of Northumbria and the seat of an Archbishop. The names of York and Yorke originated from the families that lived in the county of Yorkshire, which is the largest county in northern England. It was divided into three parts North Riding, West Riding and East Riding. Yorkshire was the home of the House of York from the English Royal Dynasty (1461-1485). The reigning members of the House of York were Edward IV, Edward V and Richard III. The House of Lancaster and the House of York rivalry resulted in the Wars of the Roses that lasted from 1455-1485 and only ended when Henry VII married Elizabeth the daughter of Edward IV and united the two houses.

Spelling Variations
York, Yorke

Popularity & Geographic Distribution
The last name York ranks 6,411th in popularity worldwide as of the 2014 Census and approximately 88,847 people carry the York surname worldwide. The name ranks particularly high in the following six states: Texas, California, North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, and Indiana.  It ranks highest in the following countries: United States (68,915), England (6,740), Canada (2,837), Australia (2,384), Cambodia (2,312), South Africa (1,921)

Early Bearers of Surname
General Sir Joseph York; Sir John York or Yorke (died 1569?), an English merchant and politician, Master of the Mint, Sheriff of London in 1549
William Yorke (1609-1666), an English lawyer and politician

Early Marriages for York
James York married Deborah Bell on Jan. 19, 1669 in Boston, Massachusetts
Abigail Yorke married John Beebe in May 1659 in Stonington, Connecticut
Caroline York married Wilim Haywood on Oct. 27, 1555 in Skelton, York, England
Margaret York married Gilberte Byrumston on Oct. 18, 1573 in Bagby, York, England
Isabell York married Nich Roger on Oct. 10, 1593 in Snitterfield, Warwick, England
Margarita York married Antho. Wylde on Mar. 26, 1600 in Coxwold, York, England
Michael York married Parnel Tysdale in 1607 in Tydd-St. Mary, Lincoln, England
Rebecca York married John Adams on May 11, 1607 in Southwick, Sussex, England
Ann York married John Smith in 1609 in Upmarden, Sussex, England
Sara York married Nichous Richardson in 1610 in Alford, Lincoln, England
Joseph York married Elyzabeth Sandiford on Dec. 5, 1613 in All Hallows Goldsmith Street, Exeter, Devon, England
Mary York married Thomas Moyle in 1614 in Stepney, Middlesex, England
William York married Isbell High on Feb. 10, 1617 in Brancepeth, Durham, England
Frances York married Sara Owen on Dec. 21, 1626 in Saint Chad, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England
Alicia Yorke married Thomas Johnson on May 13, 1568 in Melton-Mowbray, Leicester, England
Edmond Yorke married Margery Laicun or Laitun on Jan. 30, 1570 in Saint Stephen Walbrook and Saint Benet
Robtus. Yorke married Jana Spencer on May 28, 1570 in Melton-Mowbray, Leicester, England
Margaryt Yorke married Nycholas Chandler in 1570 in St. Edmunds, Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
Richarde Yorke married Alice Grene in 1575 in Willoughby, Lincoln, England
Jane Yorke married Thomas Rice on Nov. 24, 1575 in Hannington, Wiltshire, England
Agnes Yorke married John Day in Jul. 1577 in Harpenden, Hertford, England
Willm. Yorke married Margritt Husher on Oct. 6, 1578 in Faversham, Kent, England
Agnes Yorke married Anthony Mydleton on Nov. 23, 1578 in Alne, York, England
Ellyne Yorke married Henry Rycherdson on Nov. 22, 1585 in Thimbleby, Lincoln, England
Thomas Yorke married Constans Hovenden on Dec. 14, 1586 in Ticehurst, Sussex, England
Elizabeth Yorke married William Johnson on Feb. 15, 1586 in Saint Mary Mounthaw, London, England
Poll Yorke married Katherine Sevearnne on Sep. 22, 1588 in St. Botoph Aldgate, London, England
Ellsabeth Yorke married Thomas Finlay on Jan. 19, 1588 in Coningsby, Lincoln, England
Jone Yorke married Robert Applard on Sep. 14, 1592 in Little Steeping, Lincoln, England
John Yorke married Margery Graunte Nov. 28, 1594 in Uppingham, Rutland, England
Edward Yorke married Margret Cressye on Jun. 15, 1595 in Winteringham, Lincoln, England
Edward Yorke married Margret Mershe on Jan. 23, 1598 in Claines, Worchester, England

History, Genealogy & Ancestry
Alexander Grantham Yorke, Esquire
Alexander Grantham Yorke, Esquire, commonly known as the Honourable Alexander Grantham Yorke, Master of Arts.  Born 1847, being the son of the Right Honourable the fourth Earl of Hardwicke. Armorial bearings ~ He bears for Arms:  Argent, a saltire azure, charged with a bezant, Upon the escutcheon is placed a helmet befitting his degree, with a mantling azure and argent; and for his Crest ~ upon a wreath of the colours, a lion’s head erased proper, gorged with a collar gules, charged with a bezant

Annie Yorke, Widow
Annie Yorke, Widow, commonly known as the Honourable Mrs. Eliot Constantine Yorke, second daughter of Sir Anthony de Rothschild; first Baronet.  Armorial Bearings ~ are upon a lozenge; Argent, on a saltire azure, a bezant, and impaling the arms of Rothschild, namely, quarterly 1. or, an eagle displayed sable; 2 and 3 azure, issuing from the sinister and dexter sides of the shield an arms embowed proper, grasping five arrows points argent 4.  or, a lion rampant proper, over all an escutcheon gules, thereon a target proper. Married 1873 E. C. Yorke, Esquire, commonly known as the Honourable E.C. Yorke, son of the Right Honourable the fourth Earl of Hardwicke, who died 1878.

Elizabeth Cecilia Yorke, Widow
Elizabeth Cecilia Yorke, Widow, commonly known as the Honourable Elizabeth Cecilia Yorke, daughter of the last Baron Brandon (extinct).  Married 1837, Henry Galgacas Redhead Yorke (he died 1848).

Emily Anne Millicent Yorke, Widow
Emily Anne Millicent Yorke, Widow, commonly known as the Honourable Mrs. Eliot Thomas Yorke, daughter of Emilius Henry Delme Radcliffe, of Hitchen Priory, in the county of Hertford.  Armorial bearings are ~ upon a lozenge; Argent on a saltire azure, a bezant. Married 1833 Eliot Thomas Yorke, Esquire, commonly known as the Honourable Eliot Thomas Yorke, brother of the Right Honourable the fourth Earl of Hardwicke who died 1885.

John Manners Yorke, Esquire
John Manners Yorke, Esquire, commonly known as the Honourable John Manners Yorke, Captain Royal Navy (retired), Deputy-Lieutenant and Justice of the Peace for the county of Cambridge.  Born 1840, being the son of the Right Honourable the fourth Earl of Hardwicke. Armorial Bearings ~ He bears the Arms: Argent, on a salitre azure, a bezant. Upon the escutcheon is placed a helmet befitting his degree, with a mantling azure and argent and for his Crest ~ upon a wreath of the colours, a lion’s head erased proper, collared gules, thereon a bezant.  Married 1869, Edith, daughter of the late Alexander Oswald, of Auchencuive, North Britain; and has issue living 1) Charles Alexander Yorke, Esquire, born 1869 2) Alfred Ernest Frederick Yorke, Gentleman, Lieutenant 5th Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers born 1871. 3) Claud John Yorke, Gentleman, born 1872 4) Bernard Eliot Yorke, Gentleman, born 1874 and 5) Susan.

Dame Lilian Harriet Yorke
Dame Lilian Harriet Yorke, commonly known as Lady Lilian Harriet Pelly, daughter of the Right Honourable Francis Wemyss Charteris Douglas, Earl of Wemyss, married 1st 1872 Sir Henry Carstairs Pelly, third Baronet, Member of Parliament who died 1877; 2nd 1882. Henry F. Yorke, By her 1st marriage she has issue Annie Evelyn and Constance Lilian.

YORK OF WIGHILL PARK
York, Edward, Esq. of Wighill Park, Co. York, born Jan. 6, 1802 married Nov. 25, 1835 to Penelope Beatrix the daughter of the Rev. Christopher Sykes, rector of Roos, in Holderness and has issue Edward Christopher born Oct. 14, 1842; Lucy Mary; and Caroline-Penelope.  Mr. York a magistrate and deputy-lieut of the West Riding of Yorkshire succeeded his father Jan. 27, 1843.
Lineage ~ Whittell Sheepshanks an eminent merchant of Leeds assumed by royal licensce the surname and arms of York and died in Aug. 1817 leaving by Mary his wife relict of W. Peart of Grassdington, one son and one daughter.  Richard his heir; and Mary who married in 1807 the Rev. Anthony L. Marsden of Gargrave Co. York and had issue, Charice-John; Thomas-Lister; and Mary. The son and heir, Richard York, Esq. of Wighill Park, a deputy-lieut. for the West Riding of Yorkshire, and lieut-col. of the hussar yeomanry born in Jun. 1778 served as high-sheriff in 1832.  He was married Apr. 20, 1801 to Lady Mary-Anne Lascelles the youngest daughter of Edward, the first Earl of Harewood, and died Jan. 27, 1843 leaving an only son the present Edward York, Esq. of Wighill Park. Arms~Erm, on a cross, ax, a woolpack, arg., between four hons, passant, erminiois, on a chief, gu, a sword, ppr., pommel and hilt or surmounted of a key in saltier, gold.  Crest~ A demi-lion, per fesse wavy, the upper part, gu., the lower barry, wavy of four, erminois and ax. supporting a woolpack, erect, ppr., on the breast a gold key; barways. Seat~Wighill Park, near Tadeaster.

YORKE OF BEWERLEY
Yorke, John, Esq. of Bewerley Hall and Halton Place, Co. York, J.P. and D.L., Lord of the Manor of Bewerley Appletreewick, and Ramsgill born Mar. 28, 1827 married Sept. 5, 1859 to Alice the 5th daughter of James Simpson, Esq. of West Cliffe.
Lineage ~ This ancient and eminent family has been found for many generations seated in the Co. York.  Sir Richard Yorke, Knight who was Mayor of the Staple in Calais married 1st Jane Mauleverer and had by her two sons Richard (Sir), Knight; and Thomas.  By his 2nd wife Joan he also had a son, John York married Catherine Paterdale, and was father of a daughter, the wife of Frobisher and of three sons one of whom the youngest, Sir John Yorke, Knight., Lord Mayor of London married 1st Ann the daughter of Robert Smith; and 2nd a lady named Paget.  By the former he had no less than ten sons (two of whom were knights, Sir Edmund and Sir Edward, Vice-Admiral in the British Navy), and three daughters., the youngest Amy the wife of Sir William Hilton. Sir John’s eldest son, Peter Yorke, Esq. married Elizabeth the daughter of Sir William Ingleby, Knight of Ripley Co. York, and had issue, John his heir; Thomas married 1st Frances the daughter and co-heir of George Vavsour, Esq. of Spaldington;  and 2nd Frances the daughter of Bapthorpe of Bapthorpe, Notts, By the latter he left at his decease a son, John, heir to his uncle; William who had a son, John; and Richard who died unmarried. The eldest son, Sir John Yorke, of Gowthwaite, Co., York received the honour of knighthood at Windsor 1663. He married Juliana the daughter and co-heir of Ralph Hansby, Esq. of Beverley and Tickhill, but dying without issue about 1630, was succeeded by his nephew, John Yorke, Esq. of Gowthwaite who married 1st Florence Sharpe, of Westmoreland; 2nd Catherine daughter of Sir Ingleby Daniell, Knight of Beswicke in Yorkshire.  By the former he had three daughters, Elizabeth the wife of Sir James Leslie, Lord Lindores; Frances, wife of Thomas Barney of Dale Bank, Yorkshire; and Jane wife of David Lesley, Lord Newark. By the latter he left at his decease about 1635 a son and successor, Sir John Yorke, Knight of Gowthwaite, Co. York, who married Mary daughter of Maulger Norton, Esq. of St. Nicholas, near Richmond, in the same shire, and was chosen M.P. for that borough 1661. He died Apr. 3, 1663 aged 29 and left (with a daughter Mary, wife of Sir Edward Blackett, Bart. of Newby) a son and successor, Thomas Yorke, Esq. of Gowthwaite and Richmond, born June 29, 1658 married Nov. 9, 1690 Catherine the only daughter and heir of Thomas Lister, Esq. of Arnold’s Biggin and had by her (who died Apr. 24, 1731) two sons and one daughter, John his heir; Thomas, successor to his brother; and Catherine married 1802-03 to Sir James Clavering, Bart. of Axwell and Greencroft.  Mr. Yorke died 1716 and was succeeded by his eldest son, John Yorke, Esq. of Gowthwaite and Richmond, bapt. Dec. 16, 1754. He married Jan. 5, 1732 to Anne daughter and co-heir of James Darcy, Esq. of Sedbury, Lord Darcy of Navan but dying without issue July 14, 1757 was succeeded by his brother, Thomas Yorke, Esq. of Halton Place and Gowthwaite, M.P. for Richmond. He married Abigail the daughter and co-heir of William Andrewes, Esq. of Barnes Hall, Worcestershire, and had issue, 1) John, his heir 2) Thomas of Halton Place, barrister-at-law born June 5, 1738 married Feb. 1774, Jane the daughter of Joseph Reay, Esq. of Newcastle-on-Tyne and died July 3, 1811 leaving issue i) John, successor to his uncle ii) Thomas-Henry, M.A. vicar of Bishop Middleham, born Jan. 29, 1785 married 1823 Maria daughter of Major-Gen. the Hon. Mark Napier, 5th son of Francis, Lord Napier. iii) Edmund, M.A. born Feb. 8, 1787 iv) Margaret-Anne died 1847. 3) Katherine 2nd wife of Lieut-Gen. Sir John Clavering, K.B. 4) Mary 5) Anne died unmarried 1778.  Mr. Yorke died Mar. 26, 1768 and was succeeded by his son, John Yorke, Esq. of Bewerley and Richmond, high sheriff 1788. He married 1st 1763 Sophia the daughter of Sir John Glyn, Bart. of Hawarden by whom he had an only child who died in infancy; and 2nd 1769 Elizabeth-Woodstock the daughter of Peter Campbell, Esq. of Fish River, Hanover Parish, Jamaica. Mr. Yorke died Jan. 29, 1813 and was succeeded by his nephew, John Yorke, Esq. of Halton Place and of Bewerley born Feb. 29, 1776, J.P. and D.L. high sheriff 1818 who married Aug. 9, 1821 Mary the eldest daughter of the late Ichabod Wright, Esq. of Mapperley, Notts and had issue, 1) John now of Bewerley; 2) Thomas-Edward resident at Halton Place, Craven, J.P. for W.R. of Yorkshire, born Aug. 4, 1832 married Feb. 17, 1863 Augusta-Margaret, the eldest daughter of the Hon. and Rev. John Bailtie, rector of Elsdon and canon residentiary of York, and has issue, John-Cecil born Nov. 10, 1867, Mary-Augusta, Helen-Margaret, and Louisa-Caroline. 3) Frances-Mary 4) Caroline married Rev. Richard-St. John Tyrwhitt, vicar of St. Mary Magdalen, Oxford, and four sons and two daughters.  Mr. Yorke died Feb. 5, 1857. Arms~ Arg., a Sltier, Az. Crest~ A monkey’s head, erased, ppr. There seems to have been a traditionary idea entertained that the monkey’s head was adopted in consequence of that animal having been first brought to England by a member of the Yorke family. Seats~Bewerley Hall, near Ripon, and Halton Place, Craven.

YORKE OF ERDDING
Yorke, Simon Esq. of Erdding Park, Co. Denbigh, J.P. and D.L., High Sheriff of Denbighshire 1848, born Apr. 6, 1811 married Aug. 6, 1846, Victoria-Mary-Louisa the 2nd daughter of Gen. Hon. Sir Edward Cust, G.C.L., K.C.H., and niece of John, 1st Earl Brownlow and has issue 1) Philip born Apr. 28, 1849  2) Victor-Joseph born Jul. 17, 1857 3) Etheldred-Mary-Anne 4) Agneta-Susan.
Lineage ~ The Yorkes of Dover of whom the Earl of Hardwicke represents the elder line, are a branch of an ancient family long settled in North Wiltshire.  They suffered much on account of their loyalty in the great rebellion. Simon Yorke, Esq. of Dover, a person of good landed property (the eldest son of Bartholomew Yorke, of Calne, Wilts), died 1682 aged 76 leaving with other issue, Philip, father of Philip Yorke 1st Earl of Hardwicke, Lord High Chancellor and Simon.  The younger son, Simon Yorke, Esq., married Anne, sister and heir of John Meller, Esq. of Erdding, Co. Densbigh on of the masters in Chancery, and had a son and successor, Simon Yorke, Esq. or Erddig who married Dorothy the daughter and heir of Matthew Hutton, Esq. of Newnham, Herts, and dying July 28, 1767 was succeeded by his son, Philip Yorke, Esq. of Erddig, F.A.S. a gentleman not unknown in literary circle who married 1st July 2, 1770 to Elizabeth the younger daughter of the Right Hon. Sir John Cust, Bart., speaker of the House of Commons, and by her had with other issue, a son and heir, Simon.  He married 2nd Diana, the widow of Ridgway-Owen Meyrick, Esq. and daughter and heir of Piers Wynne, Esq. of Dyffryn Aled, Co. Denbigh, by Margaret his wife daughter of Robert Wynne Esq. of Garthewin. Mr. Yorke died Feb. 19, 1804 and was succeeded by his eldest son, Simon Yorke, Esq. of Erddig author of The Royal Tribes of Wales born July 27, 1771 who married Mar. 11, 1807, Margaret the younger daughter of the late John Holland, Esq. of Teyrdan, Co. Denbigh and by her (who died Nov. 16, 1848 had issue, 1) Simon now of Erddig 2) John, C.B. Major-Gen. born Jun. 11, 1814; commanded the 1st Royal Dragoons in the Crimea, was was severely wounded at Balaklava.  3) Anne married 1835 to C.T.S. Birch Reynardson, Esq. of Holywell Hall, Co. Lincoln, and died 1853. 4) Etheldred. Mr. Yorke who represented Grantham in parliament died Dec. 12, 1834. Arms~ Arg., on a saltier, az., a bezant Crest~ A lion’s head, erased, ppr., collared, gu., charged with a bezant. Motto~ Nec cupias nec metuas. Seat~ Erddig Park, near Wrexham.

PHILLIP YORKE, FIRST EARL OF HARDWICKE
One of the most distinguished ornaments to British jurisprudence that the history of this country can produce, was the only son of a gentleman of his own names, who practised the law for many years with good reputation at Dover, by Elizabeth daughter and heir of Richard Gibbon, a descendant from a highly respectable family which had been long seated on its own estates at Westcliffe, in the neighbourhood of that town.  Those who, in their envy of distinguished merit, or rather of the brilliant rewards which it sometimes obtains, will descend to use the basest weapons, have invented various reports of the meanness of this nobleman’s extraction. The truth is, that his grandfather, Simon Yorke, also of Dover, who came from Calne, in Wiltshire, and is believed to have sprung from a branch of the Yorkes, of Richmond, in the county of York, possessed good landed property in Kent, which has descended to and is still possessed by his male heirs.  The accomplished writer who some years since condescended to give us a new edition of the Peerage, alluding to these slanders says “His own merit justly stands in the place of a host of ancestors; it has hitherto therefore been deemed sufficient to begin the pedigree with this great man, but it seems something like defrauding the dead of their rights to withhold from them the honour of having produced so illustrious a descendant. This false delicacy has had a different effect from that which was intended; it has served to sanction silly rumours which perhaps it was designed to suppress by a contemptuous silence.  The family of this celebrated nobleman, if of no particular lustre either from titles or estates, was neither mean, insignificant in point of property, nor unrespectable in alliances. From them therefore if he borrowed no splendour, from them he derived no disgrace.” He was born at Dover on the first of December 1690 and educated under the care of a Mr. Samuel Morland of Bethnal Green, who was the intimate friend of the celebrated Dr. Samuel Clarke, and had then the fame of being one of the best read and most ingenious scholars of his time. He left that instructor not only deeply skilled in the learned languages, but with a nicety of classical taste which he is said to have indulged in and exercised even amidst his most arduous and important employments.  Having always been designed for the bar, he was removed at an early age to the tuition of an eminent conveyancer of the name of Salkeld, who it may be worth observing, had also at the same time as pupils three youths, Jocelyn, Parker and Strange who afterwards became respectively, Chancellor of Ireland, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and Master of the Rolls. During his stay here it happened that Sir Thomas Parker, afterward Earl of Macclesfield, and Lord Chancellor but at that time Chief Justice of the King’s Bench requested Mr. Salkeld to recommend to him a young gentleman qualified to instruct his son in the principles of the English laws, and Mr. Yorke who was the party name by Salkeld, was immediately accepted. In his performance of this office, his early professional skill, as well as his extraordinary general talents, were presently observed and admired by the father, while, combined with the most amiable of tempers they produced a strict intimacy and friendship with the son.  Under these auspices he studied the law in the Middle Temple and was called to the bar in the year 1714. He rose immediately into the most extensive course of practice, and, having in the meantime become known to the Duke of Newcastle, who, though some years younger than himself already looked forward to that exalted station in the direction of public affairs which he afterwards for so many years held, was by the interest of that nobleman, returned member for Lewes in Sussex as he was also for Seaford in the same county, in the two succeeding Parliaments. Such was now his reputation, as well as his proficiency, that before he had fully attained the age of thirty, and when he was the youngest barrister on the western circuit, his friend, the Lord Chancellor Parker, recommended him for the office of Solicitor-General, to which he was appointed on the twenty-third of March 1719-20, and soon after knighted. In this, as indeed in all others, he acquired high distinction, particularly in the trial of Mr. Layer, at the King’s Bench bar, in November 1722, for high treason.  His reply on this occasion, which occupied more than two hours in the delivery, and in which he summed up late at night the evidence against the prisoner, and ably confuted all the topics of defence, challenged and obtained the highest and most justly merited admiration. About the same time he astonished the House of Commons by his strength of judgement and acuteness of observation, in his opening of the bill against Mr. Kelly, secretary to Bishop Atterbury, and the principal agent in that prelate’s political designs. On the thirty-first of January 1723-24, he was promoted to the station of Attorney-General and had soon after a painful opportunity of proving his affection and gratitude to the Lord Macclesfield. On that nobleman’s impeachment, not less regardless of ministerial censure, or of the probable charge of imprudence on the part of his own friends, than of popular clamour, he defended in the House of Commons the fallen Chancellor, particularly against the rough attacks of his bitter enemy, Serjeant Pengelly, on his Lordship’s manner of answering the articles of impeachment and on his plea of the act of grace, with a zeal which proved that powers of his mind were fully equalled by the warmth of his heart.  In the execution of the important office of Attorney-General, says an anonymous contemporary writer in the Annual Register for 1764, who evidently knew him well, “he was remarkable for his candour and lenity. As an advocate for the Crown he spoke with the veracity of a witness and a judge; and though his zeal for justice and the due course of law was strong, yet his tenderness to the subject in the Court of Exchequer was so distinguished, that it happened once, when he touched upon his own conduct in that point, in some of the Parliamentary debates upon the Excise, 1733, the whole House of Commons assented to it with an universal applause. He was so unmoved by fear or favour in what he thought right and legal, that he often debated and voted against the Court.” In making this latter assertion the author more particularly alludes to his conduct in the House of Commons as to the affairs of the South-Sea Company; and afterward on a bill which he introduced to regulate the management of the forfeited estates of the Earl of Derwentwater, in a mode contrary to the declared opinions of most of the ministers of the day. He remained in the post of Attorney-General for ten years, when, on the resignation, in October, 1733 of the Lord Chancellor King, public opinion and indeed the ordinary usage of legal advancement, pointed to him as the successor. It is however  a curious fact, that the Crown and Government seeming indifferent, which of two most able and faithful servants to place in the exalted office, it was in a manner left to be settled in friendly negotiation between themselves, when himself and Sir Charles Talbot the Solicitor-General agreed that it would be more serviceable under some peculiar circumstances of the period, to the public, and more honourable mutually to their own characters, that the latter should succeed to it; and Sir Phillip Yorke accordingly waved his claim, for the time, to the Seal, and accepted the Chief Justiceship of the King’s Bench, which happened also then to be vacant. It is remarkable too, on this occasion that it was proposed to augment the salary of the chief of that Court from two to four thousand pounds, and that he refused to accept the increase. He was appointed on the thirty-first of October 1733 and on the twenty-third of the succeeding month was advanced to the Peerage by the title of Baron Hardwicke of Hardwicke in the county of Gloucester. In his new station he acquired a new reputation for the candour and sincerity of the Bench display without reserve those characters of nature which the artifices of the bar invariably suppress, or leave doubtful, and love and esteem for the man became now added to respect for the wisdom and learning of the judge. He is said indeed to have been a pattern of humanity, patience, and courteousness.   He presided in the Court of King’s Bench little more than two years; for his friend Lord Chancellor Talbot, dying on the seventeenth of February 1736-37, the King, four days after, delivered to him the Great Seal. From this period, through the long series of years for which Providence permitted him to remain a blessing to his country, the events of his life were chiefly confined to the performance of the duties of his court and the transactions of the cabinet. His name, as indeed could not be expected, is to be found in all the commissions of the reign of George the Second appointing Lords Justices for the administration of the executive government during the occasional absences of that Prince in Germany. So too, almost as of course, we find him sitting as Lord High Steward of England in 1746, on the trials of the Earl of Kilmarnock and Cromartie, and Lord Balmerino; and again, in the following year on that of the Lord Lovat. On the thirty-first of July 1749 he was elected High Steward of the University of Cambridge, and on the second of April 1754, received the final reward of his long and eminent services, in an unsolicited grant of the further dignities of Viscount Royston and Earl of Hardwicke. In November 1756, from no party disagreement, from no personal pique, with no secret views, but from the mere desire of that ease to which he was no so justly entitled, he resigned his high office, with the same dignified modesty which had always distinguished him in the exercise of its faculties.  This admirable nobleman died on the sixth of March 1764. By his lady who departed about two years before him, Margaret daughter of Charles Cocks of the city of Worcester, by Mary his wife, a sister of the Lord Chancellor Somers, he had five sons; Philip, his successor; Charles, father to the present noble Earl; Joseph, who created Lord Dover; John; and James who died Bishop of Ely. Lord Hardwicke also had two daughters; Elizabeth who married George, the first Lord Anson and Margaret who married Sir Gilbert Heathcote, Bart.

THE YORK FAMILY BY: WILLIAM M. SARGENT, ESQ.
There is scarcely a family in Savage’s Dictionary less noticed than this, and it is more surprising because records do exist, though widely scattered, yet sufficiently definite to insure gratifying accuracy in the earlier generations and to lay the foundation to which successors of the name may add their successive courses.  Of the six heads of families mentioned with the scantiest details in that storehouse of genealogical information, all except a certain James, who was of Stonington, L.I. are referable to the parent stem of Richard, who was the common ancestor of all the Yorks in this part of New England, with the few exceptions hereafter noted.  These people seem to have clung with a tenacity that is rare to the earlier cradles of their race, Dover, North Yarmouth, Falmouth, and Gloucester. Besides the will of Richard York there are little records containing information on him, but the will shows him to have been a worthy settler who was in good standing in his community and church, and by steady industry in his life as a planter, he had accumulated a respectable competency.  He appears first in Dover on record in 1648. In 1656 he had a grant of one hundred acres from the Town which he devised to his son Benjamin. This land appears to have been at Oyster River, as the son in 1675 was taxed there. It appears on a deed dated Aug. 7, 1661, that he had bought fifty acres at Littlejohn’s Creek of William Hilton, which was sold to Joseph Austin. In 1669 he signed a church petition. In the scarcity of authentic records of our early settlers, it is gratifying now and then to find preserved, bits of history that serve to trace certain families in their wanderings and here and there perchance a deed which may throw some light upon family connections.  Thus breaking through the obscurity of antiquity, the industrious exertions of John and Samuel sons of the the first Richard, stand out worthy the praise of their contemporaries and the emulation of their successors. They were among the earliest of the hardy first settlers who succeeded to the transitory and speculative spirits along our Eastern coast, and set in earnest about the task of transforming the primeval wilderness into the comfortable homestead along our shores. It seems the elder brother, succeeding to the paternal farm, probably from considerate care of his younger children, lingered yet awhile in the better settle region now called Durham, N.H. and remained there till June 28, 1676 when with his wife Ruth he sold to John Cutt; while Samuel, striking out for pastures new purchased with a partner on July 20, 1670 a valuable concession, to which they made claim in 1715, three years before Samuel’s death, and before the Commissioners of Eastern Claims.  A James Thomas and Sam York claimed a certain tract of land lying and belonging to Amoscoggin bounding vix. This transaction is mentioned in Sullivan’s History of Maine. They did not enjoy their possession of this new tract of land long before the first war drove them for security to the older settlements. It is doubtful if Samuel and his family ever returned to reside there. On the contrary they seem to have remained in Falmouth until the destruction of that place in the second war when they fled to Gloucester. The depositions of John Lane aged 77 and Nathaniel Wharf aged near 70 sworn to Oct. 21, 1730 testify that: “Samuel York had a lot of land near Mussel Cove in Casco Bay and built a house and possessed by virtue of a town grant more than fifty years ago (before 1680). Said lots according to our remembrance were called fifty acre lots.” The site of this homestead and the name of it’s earliest record owner are perpetrated upon the United States Coast Survey map, where “York Ledge” and “York’s Landing” are given along Falmouth Foreside.    Samuel York’s children appear with most gratifying completeness in the record of his will at Salem, and the deeds that passed between his heirs recorded at Alfred.  His heirs received recognition by the settlers in Falmouth by reason of their father’s having been an old inhabitant, and upon the North Yarmouth Town Records. His brother John had become a most influential man and was afterwards a selectman and trustee where he dwelt till the second war.  John York the older brother, doubtless attracted by his brother’s successful real estate transactions, seems to have moved down the coast soon afterward, dwelt for awhile at Scarborough, where his signature appears among a list of petitioners. At just what date moved into North Yarmouth is unknown.  Driven away by the first Indian war, he seems at one time, while dwelling at York, whither he went with his neighbors the Cousins, Brays, Saywards, Royals and others to have abandoned the intention of ever returning for he executed a deed there on June 21, 1680 of land in North Yarmouth. This area was later called Maine’s Point.  As to his family relations, it is impossible to obtain that clear insight that is afforded by the records concerning his brother Samuel’s family, owing to his untimely death, or rather massacre on the 17 of May 1690 at the fall of Casco Fort. In such troublous times there was no opportunity for will making or the orderly disposition of one’s estate.  Williamson records his death as John York was taken from Camden to pilot Major Church in 1696. This should read Samuel, who was taken prisoner on that fateful day, and is given among the list of those remaining in Canada and not redeemed by Matthew Carey in 1695. Three of John York’s children had given their evidence in depositions in Feb. 1687 about the conduct of the Indians threatening war.  These children were Richard, Benjamin and Ruth who married Henry Haskell of Gloucester. Richard and Benjamin were mentioned in their grandfather’s will. Joseph his fourth child and only remaining son, lived afterward at Gloucester and had a family of seven children, but by the death of his only son Joseph, childless and the marriage of all his daughters the name became extinct in the line of John, as early as 1735.

Early American Immigration and New World Settlers
York Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
John York, who arrived in Barbados in 1635
James York and his wife Catherine, who settled in Virginia in 1635
Kat York, aged 19, who landed in Virginia in 1635
Thomas York, who arrived in Maryland in 1636
James York, who arrived in Braintree, Massachusetts in 1647

York Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
Edward York, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1760
James York, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1760
James York, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1761
Private. Christian York U.E. who settled in Canada c. 1784
Private. George York U.E. who settled in Canada c. 1784

York Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
Richard York, English convict from Somerset, who was transported aboard the “Argyle” on March 5th, 1831, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia
Eliza York, who sailed on the ship Strathfieldsaye and arrived in Port Phillip Bay, Australia in 1814
John York, who sailed on the ship Boomerang and arrived in Melbourne, Australia in 1818
Thomas York, who sailed on the ship Blackwall and arrived in Port Phillip Bay, Australia in 1821
William York, who sailed on the ship Constance and arrived in Hobsons Bay Victoria, Australia on Oct. 27, 1851

York Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
Thomas York, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1841
Henry York, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship “John Masterman” in 1857
George York, who arrived in Nelson, New Zealand aboard the ship “John Masterman” in 1857
Mary Ann York, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Armstrong” in 1865
Albert York, aged 19, a farm labourer, who arrived in Taranaki aboard the ship “Hermione” in 1878

Mottoes
Nec cupias, nec metuas. Neither desire nor fear.

Grantees
YORK, late Sheepshanks, . . . ., of Whitwell, co. York. (See York of Hutton.)  [1796] Vol. XIX, fol. 299.
YORK, [Sir] Philip, Baron Hardwick [1733, Chief Justice of the King’s Bench]. Supporters and Crest, 29 Dec. 1733, Vol. VIII, fol. 178.
YORKE,, [Lieut.-Gen. The Hon.] Sir Joseph, K.B. [1761] [afterwards Baron Dover]. Supporters, [1761] Vol. X, fol. 310.
YORKE„ Baron Dover [1788], [Joseph]. Supporters, [1788] Vol. XVII, fol. 37.
YORKE after Dallas, James W., of co. Line, Capt. of Dragoons, 1856, Vol. LI, fol. 424.
YORKE, Lieut.-Gen. Sir Charles, G.C.B. [I860]. Arms, [1860] Vol. LIV, fol. 29 ; Supporters, fol. 32.

Notables
Alvin Cullum “Sergeant” York (1887-1964), American WWI hero, nicknamed Sergeant York, one of the most decorated American soldiers, recipient of the Medal of Honor
Alexander M. York (1838–1928), American politician
Alissa York (born 1970), Canadian writer
Alvin C. York (1887–1964), American war hero
Andrew York (b. 1958), American classical guitarist and composer
Andrew York (born 1958), American guitarist
Andy York (1894–1977), British football player
Byron York (born 1958), American author and journalist
Carol Beach York (born 1928), American children’s author
Chris York (born 1989), English rugby union player
Christian York (born 1977), American professional wrestler
Christopher York (1909–1999), British politician
Colin York (1904–1973), Australian rugby league player
Deborah York (born 1964), British singer
Dick York (1928–1992), American actor
Dolores Crow (née York; 1931–2018), American legislator
Duke James W. York Jr. (b. 1939), American mathematical physicist
Dwight York (born 1945), American author and musician
Francine York (1936-2017), born Francine Yerich, an American movie and television actress, known for her roles with Jerry Lewis, Marlon Brando, David Niven and Elvis Presley
Francine York (1936–2017), American actress
Harry York (born 1974), Canadian ice hockey player
Herbert F York (1921-2009), American nuclear physicist
Herbert York (1921–2009), American physicist
James W. York (born 1939), American mathematical physicist
James Warren York (1839–1927), American musical instrument innovator
Jason York (born 1970), Canadian ice hockey player
Jerome Bailey “Jerry” York (1938-2010), American businessman, Chairman, President and CEO of Harwinton Capital, former CFO of IBM and Chrysler
Jerry York (born 1945), American hockey coach
Jerry York (businessman) (born 1938), American businessman
John Foley York (b. 1946), American bassist and guitarist, best known for his work with The Byrds
John J. York (born 1958), American actor
John Joseph Robert York (b. 1958), American actor
John York (born 1949), American businessman
John York (died 1569), English merchant
Jones Orin York (1893–1970), American spy for Russia
Justin York (born 1983), American guitarist
Kathleen York, American actress and singer-songwriter
Keith York, English drummer
Melissa York (born 1969), American drummer
Michael York (actor) (born 1942), British actor
Michael York (field hockey player) (born 1967), Australian field hockey player
Mike York (born 1978), American ice hockey player
Morgan York (born 1993), American actress
Myrth York (born 1946), American politician
Peter York (born 1944), British management consultant, author and broadcaster
Rachel York (born 1971), American actress and singer
Richard Allen “Dick” York (1928-1992), American actor perhaps best remembered for his role as the first Darrin Stephens in the fantasy sitcom Bewitched
Robert M. York, American fighter pilot and flying ace in the U.S. Army Air Forces, during World War II, credited with 5 aerial victories
Rudy York (1913–1970), American baseball player
Russell J. York (1921–2006), American war hero
Sarah York (born 1978), American pen-pal of Manuel Noriega
Steve York (born 1943), American documentary filmmaker
Susan York, American artist
Susannah York (1939–2011), British actress
Tony York (1912–1970), American baseball player
Tyre York (1836–1916), American politician
William Herbert York (1918–2004), American musician
York (explorer) (1770–1831), American slave who served with the Lewis and Clark Expedition

American Revolution Veterans
Bell York, Connecticut, Rank of Private
Christo York, New Hampshire, Rank of Private
Collins York, Rhode Island, Rank of Private
Daniel York, New York, Rank of Private
David York, New Hampshire, Rank of Private
Edwd York, Pennsylvania, Rank of Private
Eliphalet York, New Hampshire, Rank of Private
Elisha York, Connecticut, Rank of Water
Ezekl York, New Hampshire, Rank of Private
Gershom York, New Hampshire, Rank of Corporal
Jacob York, Massachusetts, Rank of Matross
Jas York, New Hampshire, Rank of Private
Jesse York, Connecticut, Rank of Sergeant
John York, New Hampshire, Rank of Private
Joseph York, New Hampshire, Rank of Private
Joseph York, South Carolina, Rank of Private
Peter York, New York, Rank of Private
Petrus York, New York, Rank of Private
Robenson York, Virginia, Rank of Private
Robinson York, Virginia, Rank of Private
Robt York, New Hampshire, Rank of Private
Sarah York, Massachusetts, Rank of Matross
Sawney York, Connecticut, Rank of Private
Thomas York, Massachusetts, Rank of Matross

Civil War Veterans
Aaron S. York, 8th Regiment, Indiana Cavalry, Union, Indiana
Abel H. York, 33rd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Abizer York, 15th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Abram York, 120th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Adam York, 187th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Albert York, 100th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Alexander M. York, 15th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Alfred York, 47th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, Union, Kentucky
Almarene York, 13th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Union, Kentucky
Almaron York, 13th Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry, Union, Wisconsin
Alonzo York, 3rd Regiment, Vermont Infantry, Union, Vermont
Alvah B. York, 51st Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Amasa York, 60th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry (Militia), Union, Massachusetts
Amos York, 102nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Anderson York, 21st Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Union, Missouri
Andrew York, 17th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Aquilla York, 98th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Archibald York, 43rd Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Union, Missouri
Armstead York, 5th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Confederate, Kentucky
Army York, 5th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Confederate, Kentucky
Arthur York, 12th Regiment, New Hampshire Infantry, Union, New Hampshire
Asa York, 25th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Asberry York, 5th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Union, Kentucky
Augustus York, 11th Regiment, New York Cavalry, Union, New York
Balam York, 13th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Union, Kentucky
Barney York, 65th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Benj. York 12th Regiment, US Infantry, Union, Union Regular Army
Billington York, 9th Battalion, Georgia Artillery, Confederate, Georgia
Bodley York, 74th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. colored Troops
Bradbury York, 26th Regiment, New York Cavalry, Union, New York
Brantley York, 55th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Braxon York, 22nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Brisco York, 40th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Brown York, 34th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Cage York, 2nd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Union, Tennessee
Calaway York, 3rd Regiment, Tennessee Mounted Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Caleb York, 98th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Calvin York, 6th Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate, Florida
Carlos York, 189th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Caswell York, 6th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Charles York, 125th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Clarkson York, 22nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Cohn York, 1st Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Cornelius York, 1st Regiment, District of Columbia Cavalry, Union, District of Columbia
Coyle York, 47th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Cutvin York, 123rd Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Daniel York, 40th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate, Alabama
Darius York, Unassigned US Volunteer Infantry, Union, Union Volunteers
David York, 7th Battery, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Davis York, 8th Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Confederate, Missouri
Deloss York, 96th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Denison York, 40th Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry, Union, Wisconsin
Dennis York, 49th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, Union, Kentucky
Dock York, 16th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, Confederate, Tennessee
Duncan York, 1st Regiment, Mississippi Ligh Artillery, Confederate, Mississippi
Early York, 11th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate, Alabama
Edgar York, 85th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Edmond York, 131st Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Edson York, 1st Regiment, Maine Heavy Artillery, Union, Maine
Edward York, 4th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Edwin York, 26th Regiment, Connecticut Infantry, Union, Connecticut
Elder York, 5th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, Union, Illinois
Eli York, 53rd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Elias York, 1st Regiment, Engineers and Mechanics, Michigan, Union, Michigan
Emanuel York, 27th Regiment, Texas Cavalry, Confederate, Texas
Emerson York, 13th Regiment, New York Cavalry, Union, New York
Ennesley York, 26th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Enoch York, 54th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Enos York, 5th Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry, Confederate, North Carolina
Ephraim York 19th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Erastus York, 3rd Regiment, Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, Union, Pennsylvania
Eugene York, 17th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, Union, Kentucky
Evins York, 43rd Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Ezekiel York, 5th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Fayette York, 22nd Regiment, New York Cavalry, Union, New York
Felix York, 2nd Regiment, Arkansas Volunteers, Confederate, Arkansas
Finas York, 52nd Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, Union, Kentucky
Francis York, 54th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Frank York, 31st Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Frederick York, 156th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Freeman York, 1st Regiment, Maine Heavy Artillery, Union, Maine
Froyet York, 51st Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
General York, 13th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Union, Kentucky
George York, 3rd Regiment, Iowa Cavalry, Union, Iowa
Glacus York, 183rd Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Glurcis York, 22nd Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, Union, Kentucky
Godfrey York, 3rd Regiment, 3rd Brigade, 1st Division, Louisiana Militia, Confederate, Louisiana
Golusha York, 114th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Green York, 38th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate, Alabama
Hamilton York, 46th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Confederate, Georgia
Handy York, 70th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Harmon York, 16th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Harrey York, 30th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York,
Harrison York, 22nd Regiment, Texas Infantry, Confederate, Texas
Harry York, 48th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Haywood York, 8th Regiment, Tennessee Mounted Infantry, Union, Tennessee
Henry York, 22nd Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate, Alabama
Herbert York, 142nd Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Herman York, 4th Regiment, Vermont Infantry, Union, Vermont
Hewlit York, 8th Regiment, Tennessee Mounted Infantry, Union, Tennessee
Hiram York, 18th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate, Alabama
Horace York, 14th Regiment, New Hampshire Infantry, Union, New Hampshire
Howard York, 129th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois,
Hugh York, 3rd Regiment, Missouri Cavalry, Union, Missouri
Ike York, 33rd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Independent York, 68th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Ira York, 5th Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry, Union, Wisconsin
Isaac York, 7th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, Union, Illinois
Isaiah York, 33rd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Israel York, 16th Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Jackson York, 93rd Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Jacob York, 96th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
James York, 4th Regiment, Delaware Infantry, Union, Delaware
Jasper York, 10th Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Confederate, Missouri
Jefferson York, Cutshaw’s Battalion, Confederate Artillery, Confederate, Confederate Troops
Jeffrey York, 25th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Jennings York, 2nd Regiment, Indiana Cavalry, Union, Indiana
Jeremiah York, 24th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Confederate, Georgia
Jesse York, 10th Regiment, Texas Cavalry, Confederate, Texas
John York, 57th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Joseph York, 7th Regiment, Kansas Cavalry, Union, Kansas
Josiah York, 7th Regiment, New Hampshire Infantry, Union, New Hampshire
Jotham York, 94th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Lafeyette York, 18th Regiment, Mississippi Infantry, Confederate, Mississippi
Lamon York, Wright’s Regiment, Arkansas Cavalry, Confederate, Arkansas
Lander York, 9th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, Union, Tennessee
Larkin York, 22nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Lawson York, 18th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Leonard York, 6th Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate, Florida
Levi York, 94th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Lewis York, 71st Regiment, Ohio Infantry, Union, Ohio
Lorenzo York, 15th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Love York, 7th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Lyman York, 12th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Mallory York, 60th Regiment, Massachusetts Infantry, Union, Massachusetts
Manasa York, 8th Regiment, New York Heavy Artillery, Union, New York
Manuel York, 9th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, Union, Tennessee
Marion York, 1st Regiment, Alabama Cavalry, Union, Alabama
Mark York, 39th Regiment, Iowa Infantry, Union, Iowa
Marlin York, 8th Regiment, Tennessee Mounted Infantry, Union, Tennessee
Martin York, 185th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Matthew York, 94th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Meredith York, Baxter’s Battalion, Confederate Cavalry, Confederate, Confederate Troops
Micajah York, 30th Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, Union, Kentucky
Michael York, 67th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Miles York, 45th Regiment, Virginia Infantry, Confederate, Virginia
Mitchel York, 84th Regiment, United States Colored Troops, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Morris York, 120th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Moses York, 9th Regiment, Illinois Cavalry, Union, Illinois
Nathan York, 26th Regiment, Connecticut Infantry, Union, Connecticut
Nathaniel York, 82nd Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Nelson York, 23rd Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Union, Missouri
Newton York, 5th Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Confederate, Kentucky
Nicholas York, 8th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Oliver York, 21st Regiment, Michigan Infantry, Union, Michigan
Oren York, 21st Regiment, Michigan Infantry, Union, Michigan
Orestes York, 30th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Otis York, 61st Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Paris York, 138th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Patrick York, 1st Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Paul York, 1st Regiment, New Jersey Cavalry, Union, New Jersey
Pelter York, Budd’s Independent Company, Fremont Rangers, Missouri Home Guard, Union, Missouri
Perry York, 7th Regiment, Georgia Infantry, Confederate, Georgia
Peter York. 7th Independent Battery, New York Light Artillery, Union, New York
Phelix York, 128th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Philander York, 145th Regiment, Pennsylvania Infantry, Union, Pennsylvania
Philetus York, 52nd Regiment, Massachusetts Militia, Union, Massachusetts
Pleasant York, 15th Regiment, Missouri Cavalry, Confederate, Missouri
Presley York, 40th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Reilly York, Poindexter’s Regiment, Missouri Cavalry, Confederate, Missouri
Reuben York, 8th Regiment, Michigan Cavalry, Union, Michigan
Rhesa York, 2nd Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, Union, Veteran Reserve Corps
Richard York, Poe’s Battalion, Arkansas Cavalry, Confederate, Arkansas
Rishworth York, 5th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Robert York, 1st Regiment, Connecticut Heavy Artillery, Union, Connecticut
Rosaloo York, 1st Regiment, Maine Cavalry, Union, Maine
Samuel York, 13th Regiment, Vermont Infantry, Union, Vermont
Sanford York, 50th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate, Alabama
Sebin York, 3rd Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Confederate, Kentucky
Seward York, 6th Regiment, Florida Infantry, Confederate, Florida
Sewell York, 21st Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Seymour York, 22nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Shubal York, 29th Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Silas York, 40th Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Union, Missouri
Simeon York, 13th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, Union, Tennessee
Singleton York, 1st Regiment, Georgia Cavalry, Confederate, Georgia
Smith York, 99th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Solomon York, 22nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Spencer York, 5th Regiment, North Carolina Cavalry, Confederate, North Carolina
Steven York, 7th Regiment, Louisiana Infantry (Colored), Union, Louisiana
Subal York, 18th Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, Confederate, North Carolina
Sumner York, 9th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Sylvester York, 30th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Thadd York, 48th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Confederate, Tennessee
Theron York, 154th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Thomas York, 3rd Regiment, New Hampshire Infantry, Union, New Hampshire
Thorton York, 8th Regiment, Indiana Infantry, Union, Indiana
Troyet York, 51st Regiment, Illinois Infantry, Union, Illinois
Truman York, 17th Regiment, US Infantry, Union, Union Regular Army
Uriah York, 1st Regiment, Tennessee Infantry, Union, Tennessee
Vincent York, 30th Regiment, Alabama Infantry, Confederate, Alabama
Walter York, 22nd Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Warren York, 11th Regiment, US Infantry, Union, Union Regular Army
Washington York, 117th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops
Weiner York, 158th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Wells York, 12th Regiment, New Hampshire Infantry, Union, New Hampshire
Werner York, 100th Regiment, New York Infantry, Union, New York
Wesley York, 18th Regiment, Texas Infantry, Confederate, Texas
William York, Gid Nelson Alabama Light Artillery, Confederate, Alabama
Willoughby York, 5th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Willsby York, 12th Regiment, Maine Infantry, Union, Maine
Wilson York, 9th Regiment, Connecticut Infantry, Union, Connecticut
Woodbury York, 12th Regiment, New Hampshire Infantry, Union, New Hampshire
Young York, 3rd Regiment, Kentucky Cavalry, Union, Kentucky
Zachariah York, 50th Regiment, Missouri Infantry, Union, Missouri
Zebulon York, 14th Regiment, Louisiana Infantry, Confederate, Louisiana
Ziba York, 138th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry, Union, U.S. Colored Troops

York Coat of Arms Meaning

See glossary for symbol meaning.

Leave A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.