Abell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Abell Family Coat of Arms

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Abell Coat of Arms Meaning

Abell Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Abell. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Abell Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Abell blazon are the saltire, fleur-de-lis and boar. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and gules .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The saltire is one the major ordinaries, large charges that occupy the whole of the field 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire. Arguably one of the best uses of this device is that of the St. Andrews Cross, a white saltire on a blue background found on the Scottish flag. The saltire is obviously closely related to the Cross, and Wade in his work on Heraldic Symbology suggests additionally that it alludes to “Resolution”, whilst Guillim, an even more ancient writer, somewhat fancifully argues that it is awarded to those who have succesfully scaled the walls of towns! 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Abell Name

This interesting and unusual surname is Anglo-Scottish.  It mainly introduced by returning 12th-century Crusaders and pilgrims from the Holy Land.  ‘Abel’ originates from the Hebrew given name ‘Hevel’ meaning ‘breath or vigour’, and was presumably a name of affection or possibly a nickname.  As a personal name ‘Abel’ (Hevel) borne by the son of Adam, who was killed by his brother Cain.  It was very popular as a given name in Christendom during the Middle Ages, when there was a cult of ‘suffering innocence’ which Abel described. More common variations are: Abella, Abello, Abelli, Abelie, Abelle, Abelly, Ajbell, Aibell, Abbell, A’Bell, Aubell.

The surname Abell was first found in the divisions of Kent, Derbyshire and Essex. ” Abell was also an Essex family, although branches spread into the divisions of Kent and Derby.”  The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of William Abel,  dated 1197, in the Pipe Rolls of the County of Essex. It was during the reign of King Richard I, who was known as “The Lionheart”, dated 1189-1199.  Surnames all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Some of the people with the name Abell who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Robert Abell (1605-1663), English settler from Stapenhill, Derbyshire who landed in Weymouth, Massachusetts in 1630 aboard the Winthrop Fleet.  Peter Abell, who landed in Long Island in 1656. James Abell, who arrived in Maryland in 1664.  Joseph Abell, who landed in Maryland in 1667.  Macklett Abell, who came to Maryland in 1667. People with the surname Abell who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Hans Jacob Abell, who landed in New York in 1709.

The following century saw much more Abell surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Abell who came in the United States in the 19th century included E S Abell, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1850.  R Abell, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851.

Abell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Abell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Essex). Ar. a fesse purp. betw. three boars’ heads couped gu. Crest—An arm in armour embowed ppr. holding a sword ar. hilted or, enfiled on the arm with a wreath ar. and gu.
2) (co. Kent). Barry of four or and az. on a chief sa. three plates.
3) (Kent and London). Ar. a saltire engr. az. (another gu.). Crest—The same as Abell of Essex.
4) (Stapenhill, co. Derby. Visit. 1611). Ar. on a saltire engr. az. nine fleurs-de-lis of the field.
5) Ar. on a saltire engr. az. twelve fleurs-de-lis or.
6) Vert fretty ar. and a fesse gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67