Aikin Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Aikin Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Aikin. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

aikin coat of arms

Aikin Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Aikin blazon are the cock, lion, buckle and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, gules and azure .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The cock, and other members of its avian family are often found in coats of arms, although telling them apart simply from their images can sometimes be a challenge! Many times the precise choice of species arises as a play on words on the family name, sometimes now lost in history. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cock The cock itself, Wade points out is a “bird of great courage” and might be used as a symbol of “watchfullness”, being the herald of the dawn. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 13A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 16Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100 The buckle may fall into this category, it is present in a surprising number of different forms and has a long heritage in use, 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Buckle being considered honourable bearings and are said to “signify victorious fidelity in authority”. 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P115

Aikin Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Aikin Name

Aikin Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Aikin:

This unique Scottish name acquires from “Ad,” a pet form of the Hebrew male given name “Adam,” which means “red earth,” the element from which the first man was created, and the Olde English pre 7th Century little addition of “-kin.” The surname first appears in the early 15th Century, and Andrew Atkin shows as an observer in Aberdeen in 1469. Since the mid-17th Century the name has been popular in north-east Ulster, the earliest associate being to William Ekyn, lessee on the Cunningham estate in 1613. In the new era, the surname has many various spellings such as Aiken, Aicken, Aikin, Aitkin, Aitken, Atkin, Aickin and Aitin. In September 1590, Violet Aiken married George Young at South Leith, Midlothian, and Agnes, daughter of John Aiken, named in February 1610, at Dalkeith, also in Midlothian. Some distinguished name ancestors were Dr. Joseph Aiken, the author of “Londerias,” described in verse of the siege of Derry from a Protestant defender’s point of view, published a few years after that event and also Frank Aiken, Irish Minister for External Affairs, whose work at the United Nations was important.

Variations:

More common variations are: Aickin, Yaikin, Aikina, Aikine, Aaikien, Aikinn, Aaikin, Aikain, Auikin, Ikin.

Scotland:

The surname Aikin first appeared in Lanarkshire, an old division in the central Strathclyde area of Scotland, now separated into the Council Areas of North Lanarkshire, South Lanarkshire, and the City of Glasgow, where they originated in the old barony of Akyne. One of the first records of the name was Atkyn de Barr in 1340 and next in 1405 when named “John of Akyne, a Scottish dealer requested for the return of his ship and goods was illegally arrested in England.” The name and all its alternatives are derivatives of Adam, created from ‘Ad, ‘the shortened form of Adam + ‘kin.”

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Akyne, dated about 1405, in the “Records of Scotland.” It was during the time of King Robert who was known to be the “The Stuart,” dated 1371-1420. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation..

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Aikin had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Aikin who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Abel Aikin, who arrived in New York in 1804. David Aikin, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1807. John Aikin arrived in New York in 1812. Joseph Aikin at the age of 29, landed in Delaware in 1812. John Aikin, who arrived in New York, NY in 1816.

Canada:

People with the surname Aikin settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in the 18th and 19th. Some of the individuals with the surname Aikin who came to Canada in the 18th century included Charles Aikin settled on St. John Island in 1775. William Aikin, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1775.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Aikin: United States 1,227; Brazil 175; Canada 131; England 70; New Zealand 66; Australia 61; Kazakhstan 29; Russia 25; Indonesia 12; India 11.

Notable People:

Francis Aickin (died 1805), was an Irish actor, who worked at the Edinburgh Theatre in Scotland, and between the year 1765 and 1792 in the theaters in the West End of London.

George Ellis Aickin (1869-August 1937) was a British Anglican priest bishop in Australia, where he retired from his job as an administrator of Melbourne.

Sir Keith Arthur Aikin, KBE, QC, (February 1916–June 1982), was an Australian justice. He was a Justice of the High Court of Australia.

Aikin Family Gift Ideas

Browse Aikin family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More aikin Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Liverpool). (as maternally descended from the family of Macdowal) Motto—Sub robore virtus. Ar. on a chev. az. betw. two cocks in chief and a buckle in base gu. a lion ramp. of the field crowned or. Crest—An oak tree vert.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cock
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
13. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Buckle
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P115