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Armitage Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Armitage Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Armitage Family Coat of Arms

Variations of this name are: Armytage.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Armitage. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Armitage Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Armitage blazon are the lion’s head and cross crosslet. The two main tinctures (colors) are argent and gules.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 The head of the lion also appears alone on many coats of arms, but its use in this form is largely to enable a clear difference from similar arms that use the complete animal, and its significance should be taken to be the same as the lion entire, being a symbol of “deathless courage”. 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P59

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, being symetrical both vertically and horizontally and having an additional cross bar on each arm. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Armitage Name

Armitage Origin:

England

Origin of Armitage:

Armitage is a simple and unique surname which is listed in different spelling forms such as Armitage, Armytage, Armatidge, Hermitage, etc. This name derives from Anglo-French origin. It comes from the Ancient French word “hermite,” which itself comes from the Greek word “eremos” which means “lonely.” And was authentically given as a locational name to any individual who lived by a hideaway, or a place of training or learning, or as a geographical name which was related to the any of the places named with the above word. These areas include Hermitage in Durham, Northumberland, Dorset, Berkshire and Sussex, and Armitage in Staffordshire. Previous instances of the surname consist of Hugh del Hermytage in Warwickshire in the year 1296, Willelmus del Ermytache in Yorkshire in 1379 and John de Armitage in Sheffield, Yorkshire in the year 1423. In April 1596, William Armitage, priest of Billingford, Norfolk, was represented in Ecclesiastical documents of that division. Many name holders may trace back to a family existing at Armitage Bridge, near Huddersfield, in West Yorkshire, in the 13th Century, and in Yorkshire that the name still spread widely. Previous migrants in North America consist of Henry Armitage, who moved from the Barbados Islands on the ship “Society” obligated for Boston in March 1678, and Enoch Armitage of Wooldale, Yorkshire, who landed in America later 1677.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Aramitage, Armiatage, Armittage, Armitagee, Armtage, Armitge, Armatage, Armytage, Armetage, Armitige,

England:

The name Armitage first appeared in the West Riding of Yorkshire at Kirkless, a village, in the place of worship of Hartshead Clifton, the church of Dewsbury, wapentake of Morley.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard de Ermitage, which was dated 1259, in the “Premium Court Rolls of Cheshire.” It was during the time of King Henry III, who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” 1216 – 1272.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Armitage settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Armitage who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Godfrey Armitage and Joseph Armitage who both landed in Lynn, Massachusetts in the same year in 1630. Thomas Armitage arrived in Lynn Massachusetts in 1635. Godfrey Armitage of Lynn moved to Boston, Massachusetts in 1639. Abra Armitage, who arrived in Virginia in 1652.

Some of the people with the name Armitage who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Eleazer Armitage, who landed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1712.

Some of the people with the name Armitage who settled in the United States in the 19th century included James Armitage landed in America in 1804. Joshua Armitage, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1811. Hannah Armitage, who landed in New York in 1822.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Armitage who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Harvey Armitage landed in Canada in 1834. Seth Armitage, William Armitage and Amos Armitage, all arrived in Canada in the same year in 1841.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Armitage who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Joseph Armitage, an English prisoner from York, who shifted aboard the “Albion” in May 1823, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. James Armitage, who was an English prisoner from Middlesex, who moved aboard the “Albion” in September 1826, arriving in New South Wales, Australia. Gilen Armitage arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Asia” in 1839. Ellen Armitage at the age 24, arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship “James Fernie.” Gille Armitage at the age of 19, arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship “Dirigo.”

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Armitage who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included E. Armitage arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Cashmere” in 1854. John Armitage, Mary Ann Armitage, William C. Armitage and Ann E. Armitage, all arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Annie Wilson” in the same year in 1863.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Armitage: United States 5,166; England 9,615; Scotland 597; Ireland 142; Australia 2,024; Canada 2,057; France 245; Wales 226; New Zealand 485; South Africa 1,132.

Notable People:

Alan Armitage (born 1930), is an English cricket player.

Albert Borlase Armitage (1864–1943), was a Scottish adventurer.

Alison Armitage (born 1965), is a British artist.

Arnold Armitage was a British-American entertainer.

Bernard Armitage (1890–1976), was an English doctor.

Charles Ingram Armitage (1849–1917), was an English cricket player.

David Armitage (born 1988), is an Australian football player.

Armitage Family Gift Ideas

Browse Armitage family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Ireland). (Dadnor, co. Hereford, and Coole, co. Louth; as home by the late Whaley Armitage, Esq., J.P., and his sons, the Rev. Braithwaite Armitage, J.P., and Arthur Armitage, Esq., J.P., of Dadnor, claiming from the senior branch of the Armitages of Yorkshire). Motto—Fractum non abjicio ensem. Gu. a lion’s head erased betw. three crosses-crosslet ar.
2) (Milnsbridge House, co. York). Motto—Semper paratus. (Kirklees, co. York, bart.) Motto—Semper paratus. Gu. a lion’s head erased betw. three cross crosslets ar. Crest—A dexter arm embowed couped at the shoulder habited or, cuffed ar. holding in the hand ppr. a staff gu. headed and pointed or.
3) (Sir Elkanah Abmitage, of the Priory, Pendleton, near Manchester). Gu. a lion’s head erased within an orle ar. betw. three crosses potent or. Crest— In front of a dexter arm embowed vested gu. cuff ar. the hand grasping the blade of a sword in bend sinister, the point downwards, ppr. pomel and hilt or, an escocheon gold, charged with a cross potent gu.
4) (Keresford Hill, co. York, Visit, co. York, by Dugdale, 1665). Gu. a lion’s head erased betw. three crosses bottonee, and in chief a mullet ar.
5) (London and Yorkshire). Ar. three crosses botonnee gu. Crest—A demi lion ar. holding in the dexter paw a cross botonnee gu.
6) (Yorkshire). Az. a lion’s head erased betw. three crosses crosslet or.
7) (Milnsbridge House, co. York). Motto—Semper paratus. (Kirklees, co. York, bart.) Motto—Semper paratus. Gu. a lion’s head erased betw. three cross crosslets ar. Crest—A dexter arm embowed couped at the shoulder habited or, cuffed ar. holding in the hand ppr. a staff gu. headed and pointed or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P59
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P59
18. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
19. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
20. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103