Ashmore Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Ashmore Family Coat of Arms

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Ashmore Coat of Arms Meaning

Ashmore Name Origin & History

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Ashmore Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Ashmore blazon are the trefoil, lion rampant and star. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and or.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77More modern arms might use the term star explicitly to refer to the celestial object, in which case it is usually known as a blazing star 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Star

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Ashmore Name

Origins of Ashmore:
This interesting surname is of English locational origin from a place so called in Dorset.  The place name is noted as “Aisemare” in the Domesday Book of 1086 and acquires from either the Old English pre 7th Century “aesc” meaning ash and “mere” a lake.  So, “lake where ash-trees grow” or as the place is on the Wiltshire border it may be from the Old English particular name “Aesca” and “(ge)maere” a boundary.  So, “Aesca’s boundary”. The surname may also be from any of several minor places combination of the Old English components “aesc” ash and “mor” a marsh or fen.  In the new era, the surname has many variant spellings including Ashemore, Asmore, Ashmoore, Ashmere, etc..  In July 1562, John, son of John Ashmore, named at St. Michael’s, Cornhill, and Elizabeth daughter of Roger Ashmore named in October 1596, at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney.

Variations:
More common variations are: Ashmoore, Ashemore, Ashmorre, Ashmoree, Ashmorey, Ashomore, Ashmoure, Ashamore, Ashmor, Ashemoore.

England:
The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Ashemore, dated 1561, in the St. Michael, Cornhill. It was during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, who was known as “Good Queen Bess” dated 1558-1603.  Surnames all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Ashmore landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th.    Some of the people with the name Ashmore who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Ashmore, who arrived in Maryland in 1633.  William Ashmore settled in Maryland in 1634.  John Ashmore settled in Maryland in 1634.  Anthony Ashmore settled in Barbados in 1635.  Anthony Ashmore, aged 33, arrived in Barbados in 1635. Individuals with the surname Ashmore who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Sarah Ashmore, who came to Virginia in 1714.  Elizabeth Ashmore settled in Maryland in 1727.  John Ashmore, who landed in Georgia in 1749. The following century saw much more Ashmore surnames arrive.  Some of the individuals with the surname Ashmore who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included S Ashmore, who landed in San Francisco, California in 1851.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Ashmore who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Eliza Ashmore arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Britannia” in 1846.  Rose Ashmore arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Inconstant” in 1849.  William Ashmore, aged 25, a labourer, arrived in South Australia in 1850 aboard the ship “Fatima”.  Joseph Ashmore arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship “Thetis”.  Susan Ashmore arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Switzerland.”

Ashmore Family Gift Ideas

Browse Ashmore family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (granted to Charles Ashmore, of Belfast, Esq., Lieut.-Col. 30th Foot). Motto—Cave adsum. Ar. a lion ramp. ppr. betw. in chief two stars of six points gu. and in base a trefoil vert. Crest—A star wavy of six points ar. betw. two branches of laurel ppr.
2) (Ireland). Sa. three lions’ heads erased or. Crest—A demi eagle displ. with two heads or, each regally crowned ppr.
3) Or, three lions’ heads erased sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Star