Beane Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Beane Family Coat of Arms

Variations of this name are: Bean, MacBean, McBean.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Beane. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Beane Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Beane blazon are the lion, hand, ship and sword. The four main tinctures (colors) are red, gules, argent and sable.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The hand, unless we are told otherwise is a dexter (right) hand shown palm outwards and fingers upwards.14A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305. It demonstrates faith, sincerity and justice, and in the form of two right hands clasped can mean union or alliance15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92. There is a special form called the “Hand of Ulster” which is a sinister hand gules on an argent background (a left hand, red upon white). Originally the Badge of Ulster, the Province of Northern Ireland, it has come to be used as an addition to existing arms, in an escutcheon (small shield) or canton (small square) to indicate that the holder is also a Baronet.16Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56

We do not need to look far to find the symbolism in the presence of a ship in a coat of arms, they appear regularly in the arms of port towns and merchant companies and families. They usually appear as a three masted wooden vessel known as a lymphad 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Shiop but are often described in some detail as to the disposition of their sails, presence and colours of flags and standards and so on. 18A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P294

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Beane Name

Beane Origin:

England, Scotland

Origin of Beane:

This unique and interesting name has three possible origins. The first origin of the surname hails from an Anglo-Saxon professional name for a retailer or producer of beans, from the Olde English word pre- 7th Century ‘bean’. The second origin belongs to the Middle English (1100-1500) word ‘bene’, meaning friendly and good-natured. The name was provided as a nickname for a polite person. The third available origin is Scottish and is the English form of the unique Gaelic name ‘Beathan’, a shortened form of ‘be(a)tha, life. The name first known recording was in 1166 included Robert filius Biene in Cumberland in 1168, and later the following: Ricardus filus Bene (1278, Lancashire) and Juliana Bean (1301, Yorkshire). The present surname variations are found to be Bean(e), Been, McBean, McBain, and McBayne. According to church documents in London, the baptismal naming of Thomas, son of Francis and Emma Margaret Bean, was on May 1840 at St. Andrew’s, Holborn, and George Bean married Sarah Payne on October 1787 at Bermondsey. Early documentation in Scotland is one Ferchard Bean (1428, Edinburgh).

VARIATIONS:

Some common variations are: Beaney, Beayne, Beaine, Beaune, Beyane, Beanie, Beanne, Baeane, Beiane, Beahne.

Scotland:

The surname Beane is first found in Aberdeen (part of the modern day Grampion area), where the name appeared as Bean who was a judge in the year 1210. It is believed that the MacBains transferred to Inverness-shire, as sod bearers to the Chiefs of the famous tribe Chattan (a dominant clan of early tribes). The initial meaning of the name was “son of the sincere fellow”, and was regularly expanded to MacBean (Bain).

The very first recorded spelling of the family name was shown to be that of Ailwardus Bene, dated 1166, The Norfolk Division Pipe Rolls. It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be the “Builder of Churches,” dated 1154-118. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Beane settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Beane who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Christopher Beane and William Beane, who landed in Virginia in 1618. Ralph Beane, who arrived in Maryland in 1633, Steeven Beane at the age of 20, and Tho Beane at the age of 21, landed in Virginia in the same year 1635.

Some of the people with the name Beane who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Peter Beane, who landed in Virginia in 1700. Alexander Beane, who arrived in Virginia in 1717 and John Will Beane, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1767 during the 18th century.

People with the name Beane who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Juan Beane, who landed in New Spain in 1836 and Christina Beane at the age of 27 landed in New York, NY in the year 1876.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Beane: United States 6,057; England 247; France 49; Australia 48; Belize 2; Canada 66; Indonesia 2; Spain 2; Russia 1; Wales 1.

Notable People:

Billy Beane (born 1962), was an American professional player in baseball and currently the head office director of MLB. He is the Executive Vice president and the part owner of the Oakland Athletics. Before his head office duties, he worked as an MLB referee between the years 1984 and 1989 for the New York Mets, Minnesota Twins, Detroit Tigers, and Oakland A’s.

Carl Beane (1952–2012), was an American sports radio broadcaster from 1972 to 2012 and was famous as the reporter for the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball.

Douglas Carter Beane was an American author and novelist. He was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania and raised in Wyomissing, Pennsylvania. Beane now lives in New York. His most famous work is writing the script for To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar, and many other plays including The Country Club and The Little Dog Laughed.

Beane Family Gift Ideas

Browse Beane family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Inverness, Scotland, 1672). Blazon: Quarterly, 1st, or, a lion ramp. gules; 2nd, argent a dexter hand couped apaumee gules; 3rd, argent a sword in pale within a bordure indented gules; 4th, or, a lymphad, her oars in saltire sable Crest—A cat sejant proper Motto—Touch not a cat, but a glove.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92
16. Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Shiop
18. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P294