Bevan Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bevan Family Coat of Arms

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Bevan Coat of Arms Meaning

Bevan Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Bevan. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.
bevan coat of arms

Bevan Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Bevan blazon are the dove, annulets and griffin. The four main tinctures (colors) are azure, ermine, or and sable.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The dove is an example of this, closely related birds such as pigeon and stock dove are frequently mentioned in arms but visually almost identical. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dove The dove itself is said to represent “loving constancy and peace” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80, the other birds possibly some play on words with the family name (PIDGEON for example).

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 17Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 18A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]19Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bevan Name

Bevan Origin:

England, Wales

Origin of Bevan:

It is a unique surname with Welsh origin, and different spelling forms such as Bevan, Bevin, Bevon, Beavan, Beaven, and Beavon. The surname appeared at the end of 13th Century. Previous recordings consist of Howel ap Evan (around about 1300) in the “Notification of Parliament,” and John and Richard Bevand are recorded in the “Schedule of Freemen in Chester’ (1747)”. Parish documentation include Anne Beavan who married John Blighton in July 1586, at St. Christopher le Stocks, London, and Rachel Bevan who married Francis Casson in June 1589, at St. Martin in the Fields, Westminster. One Richard Bevin, at the age of 60 years, a drought migrant, traveled from Liverpool aboard the “Yorkshire,” destined for New York in July 1846.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Beavan, Bevean, Bevain, Bevaun, Bevany, Bevian, Bevani, Bevane, Bevvan, Bevana.

England:

The surname Bevan firstly organized in Herefordshire, where they held a family seat from earlier times.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Edenevet ap Lenan, which was dated 1287, assistance in the “Assize Court Rolls of Cheshire.” It was during the time of King Edward 1, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272 – 1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bevan settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Bevan who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Arthur Bevan who settled in Connecticut in 1620. Bartholomew Bevan settled in Virginia in 1634. Grace Bevan settled in New England in 1654. Lewis-Bevan, who landed in America in 1654 and Thomas Bevan arrived in Maryland in 1663.

Some of the people with the name Bevan who settled in the United States in the 18th century included William Bevan, who came to America in 1764.

Some of the individuals with the name Bevan who settled in the United States in the 19th century included William Bevan, who landed in Connecticut in 1812. Edward Bevan, who landed in New York, NY in 1833. James Bevan, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1852. Sarah Bevan, at the of 35 and Susannah Bevan both arrived in New York in the same year in 1864.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Bevan who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Henry Bevan at the age of 22, who arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Trafalgar.” Henry Bevan arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Trafalgar” in 1849. Thomas Bevan at the age of 28, a Welsh prisoner from Glamorgan, who traveled aboard the “Aboukir” in December 1851, coming in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. Phillip Bevan at the age of 27, who was a worker, arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship “Navarino.” Samuel Bevan at the age of 22, who was a laborer arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship “Adelaide.”

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Bevan who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Edward Bevan who landed in Ohau, New Zealand in 1840. Thomas Bevan landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840 aboard the ship” Lady Nugent.” George Bevan landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1841 aboard the ship Lady Nugent. Thomas Bevan, who was a rope maker at the age of 29 and George Bevan, at the age of 17, both arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship “Lady Nugent” in the same year in 1841.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bevan: United States 5,102; England 11,605; Wales 4,007; Australia 3,303; Scotland 479; Canada 1,407; South Africa 1,735; France 563; Germany 303; New Zealand 701.

Notable People:

Alan Bevan is a Canadian bagpipe player.

Alonza Bevan (1970–), is an English bass player.

Aneurin Bevan (1897–1960), was a British leader of the Labour Party.

Bev Bevan (1945–), is an English drummer.

Bill Bevan, American footballer, and referee.

Billy Bevan is an Australian film producer.

Brian Bevan (1924–1991), was an Australian player in rugby.

Christopher Bevan (born 1937), is a Rhodesian merchant.

David Gilroy Bevan (1928–1996), was an English congressman.

Edward John Bevan (1856–1921), was an English chemist.

Edwyn Bevan (1870–1943), was an English scholar.

Hal Bevan (1930–1968), was an American baseball player.

Hilary Bevan Jones (1952–), is a British television director.

Bevan Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bevan family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (granted 1695 to William Bevan, Esq., of Pen-y-Coed, co. Carmarthen, high sheriff of that shire, and his brothers Theophilus Bevan and Thomas Bevan, D.D.). Blazon: Azure a dove agent beaked and legged gules between three annulets or, each enriched with a ruby proper. Crest—A mount vert thereon an eagle rising proper holding in the beak an annulet, as in the arms.
Notes: (Ashted, co. Surrey, granted 1774 to Thomas Bevan, Esq., of that place, son and heir of Richard Bevan, of Carmarthen, gent.). Blazon: Azure a dove proper on a chief ermine three annulets or, each enriched with a ruby. Crest—On a mural crown agent a griffin passant, or, gorged with an eastern coronet gules.
Notes: (Fosbury, Wilts, and Trent Park, Middlesex, as confirmed to Robert Cooper Lee Bevan, Esq., of Fosbury and Trent Park). Motto—Deus praesidium. Blazon: Ermine a bull passant between three annulets gules quartering, azure three bars engrailed or, a bend lozengy argent and gules, for LEE. Crest—A griffin passant or, semee of annulets gules holding in dexter claw two annulets interlaced also gules.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dove
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P80
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
17. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
19. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150