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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

First notation: 1432 W polu złotym r"g jeleni czerwony o pięciu sękach w słup. W klejnocie samo godło. Or, stags Horn gules, crest charge as in shield.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Biberstein Coat of Arms and Family Crest

More common variations are: Bieberstein, Biberstine, Beberstein, Biberstain, Biberstien, Biebersteni, Beeberstein, Biberston, Bibiersitine, Boberstine. The surname Biberstein first appeared in Wuerttemburg, where this family name became a leading contributor to the advancement of the district from old times. Individuals with the surname Biberstein landed in the United States in the 19th century.  Some of the people with the name Biberstein who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Lorenz Biberstein, who came to America in the year 1838.

Biberstein Coat of Arms Meaning

The main device (symbol) in the Biberstein blazon is the antelope. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6.

The ibex or antelope was drawn by heraldic artists in rather more fearsome aspect than its real-life appearance, with large horns, mane and a long tail. 7 These days we regard the ibex as being a member of the goat family rather than an antelope, but in the middle ages there were was no real distinction between these animals. They could adopt many of the poses of the lion, such as rampant and statant. 8

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References

  • 1 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 2 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 3 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
  • 4 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 5 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
  • 6 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 7 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Antelope
  • 8 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P210