Bretherton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bretherton Family Coat of Arms

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Bretherton Coat of Arms Meaning

Bretherton Name Origin & History

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Bretherton Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Bretherton blazon are the cross flory raguly, lion and cross moline. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross flory is typical of these, having each arm end in something very similar to the fleur-de-lys.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross moline is typical of these whereby each arm of the cross expands and curves outwards, reminscent of the fer-de-moline from which it gets its name. These cross variations are probably largely for decorative effect, and to differentiate the arms from similar ones and hence their significance is that of the Christian cross itself.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bretherton Name

Bretherton Origin:

England

Origins of Bretherton:

This unusual name is of early English origin and is a geographical surname acquiring from the place called “Bretherton” in the church of Croston, Lancashire. Strangely, the place name has held its original spelling. It wa noted as “Bretherton” in the “Cockersand Chartulary” of 1190. The name means “the settlement relating to the brothers or brother,” acquired from either the Old Norse “braethr,” brother, or Old English pre 7th Century “brethra,” brothers, with Old English “tun,” settlement, village. The new surname still most frequently appeared in Lancashire. One, Alice Bretherton married to Edmund Willeinson in February 1567, at Kirkham, in Lancashire, and Roger Bretherton married Anne Haddocke in October 1598, at St. James’s, Clerkenwell, London.

Variations:

More common variations are: Breatherton, Brotherton, Bratherton, Bortherton Bretherten, Brethurton, Brotheraton, Brothewrton, Brothertn, Brothrton.

England:

The surname Bretherton first appeared in Lancashire where they held a family seat from very early times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Henry de Brethirton, dated about 1397, in the “Preston Guild Rolls,” Lancashire. It was during the time of King Richard II who was known to be the “Richard of Bordeaux,” dated 1377 – 1399. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Bretherton had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Bretherton who came to Canada in the 19th century included John Bretherton who settled in Newfoundland in 1699.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Bretherton who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included W. Bretherton arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Wild Duck” in 1865. Arthur Bretherton and Joseph Bretherton, both arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Maraval” in the same year1880.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bretherton: England 1,135; Australia 668; South Africa 274; United States 228; New Zealand 208; Canada 36; Scotland 26; Spain 17; Mexico 3; Germany 2.

Notable People:

Philip Bretherton was born in May 1955. He is an English actor best known for his character as Alistair Deacon in the British television series As Time Goes By. He was born in Preston, Lancashire, and studied English and drama at the University of Manchester, where he was determined to become an actor.

Francis Patton Bretherton (born July 1935) is a mathematician and a professor emeritus of the section of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Bartholomew Bretherton (c.1775–1857) was a coach owner and landholder who resided in Rainhill, near Liverpool. He founded St Bartholomew’s Parish, Rainhill and owned Rainhill House, which became Loyola Hall.

David Bretherton (February 1924 – May 2000) was an American film director with more than 40 credits for films published from 1954 to 1996.

Bretherton Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Hey, co. Lancaster. 1664). Sa. a cross flory raguly sa.
2) (Rainhill, co. Lancaster). (This coat is borne on an escutcheon of pretence by the Marchesa Stapleton Bretherton. See Stapleton.) Per chev. engr. sa. and ar. in chief two lions pass. and in base a cross moline counterchanged.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128