Broxton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Broxton Family Coat of Arms

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Broxton Coat of Arms Meaning

Broxton Name Origin & History

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Broxton Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Broxton blazon are the lion and cross pattee fitchee. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and or .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross pattee fitchee is typical of these, pattee indicating that the upper arms spread out at the ends, fitchee showing that the lower arm ends in a point as if is to planted in the ground.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Broxton Name

Broxton Origin:

England

Origins of Broxton:

Broxton is a famous English surname. It is important for the number of varieties of the spelling, which seems so surprising given that it starts from two very simple place names. The most suitable source is either the village of Brockton in the Division of Staffordshire or according to the popular Victorian etymologist Canon Charles Bardsley, Brogden village near Skipton, in North Yorkshire. The presumable answer is that both places have provided the sources for the name and that over the centuries given the spelling has at best been unusual, and local dialects very thick, has lead to a “fusing” of spellings. It is absolutely the case in the parish of Greater London where, from the 17th century, many name owners seem to have appeared. These “variations” introduce the basic Brockton, Broxton, and Brogden, as well as the limited or possibly ended Brookton, Brockten, Bruckstone and many more. The name means “Badgers Farm,” or possibly “Brook Farm,” or in the situation of Brogden, “Badgers Valley.” First examples of the surname registration contain one Christiana de Broghden in the Yorkshire Census Tax rolls of 1379, William Brockden, a freeman of the city of York in 1544, Katherine Broxton of Eccleshall, Staffordshire, in May 1655, and Henry Brockton, who married Joan Stephenson, at St Giles Cripplegate in October 1683.

Variations:

More common variations are: Boroxton, Brxton, Broxtn, Braxton, Brixton, Broxten, Brexton, Barxton, Proxton, Bruxton.

England:

The surname Broxton first appeared in the hamlet of Broxton Cheshire where still today the hamlet and a local church in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester can appear. Broxton Old Hall (or Broxton Higher Hall) is on Old Coach Road about 1km west of the hamlet of Brown Knowl in the church of Broxton. The site has existed since before 1327 and the house records from 1595. Doubtfully, the surname descended from the residents of the lands of Broxton, Roger and Picot who were undertenants of Robert FitzHugh, a Norman Baron who listed in Cheshire in the Domesday Book poll of 1086. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varietions of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Broxton had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Broxton landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 18th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Broxton who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Thomas Broxton, who arrived in America in 1742. Thomas Broxton who settled in America in 1743.

People with the surname Broxton who landed in the United States in the 19th century included Edward Broxton, who arrived in Indiana in 1853-1866. Rose Broxton at the age of 28, who landed in America from Shreusbury, in 1899.

The following century saw more Broxton surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Broxton who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Benjamin Broxton at the age of 45, who moved to America from Birmingham, England, in 1907. James William Broxton at the age of 25, who shifted to the United States from Burnley, England, in 1913. Edward Broxton at the age of 55, who landed in America from Kissallagh, Ireland, in 1916.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Broxton: United States 1,494; England 301; Australia 58; New Zealand 21; Spain 11; Wales 2; Ireland 2; Germany 2; Sweden 1; Italy 1

Notable People:

Jonathan Roy Broxton was born in June in the year 1984. He is an American professional baseball relief pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals of Major League Baseball (MLB). He played for the Los Angeles Dodgers, Kansas City Royals, Cincinnati Reds, and Milwaukee Brewers.

Broxton Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Fun. Ent. Ire., 1657). Ar. a lion ramp. tail reflexed over the head sa.
2) (Broxton, Colchester, temp. Edward III.). Or. a cross pattee fitchee sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128