Bruton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bruton Family Coat of Arms

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Bruton Coat of Arms Meaning

Bruton Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Brutyn.

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Bruton Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Bruton blazon are the chevron, fess and wolf. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, azure and argent .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 8A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.9The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

The wolf was the symbol of Rome long before the advent of heraldry, and before that was sacred to the ancient Egyptians. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P31 In heraldry it is probably more often just as head than the whole animal, but when whole it can be in many different poses. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wolf It is found from the earliest instances of arms, but quite often due to a derivative of its French name, loup sharing the initial sound of many family names like LOWE and LOVATT.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bruton Name

Bruton Origin:
England

Origins of Bruton:
This interesting and unusual name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a locational surname starting from the place called ‘Bruton’ in Somerset.  The place was noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 as ‘Briwetone’, and means ‘the settlement on the River Brue’, acquired from an old British (pre-Roman) river name which is related to the Celtic (Welsh) river name ‘bryw’, which means brisk, accurate, with the Old English pre 7th Century ‘tun’, settlement, information. Locational surnames were mostly acquired by those earlier inhabitants of a place who had moved to another area and were thereafter best recognized by the name of their birthplace.  The Records of the University of Oxford for 1616 records one William Bruton, of Devonshire, and the wedding of John Bruton and Mary Buckingham noted at St. Giles, Cripplegate, London in June 1648.  Since the Old and Middle English languages lacked specific spelling rules, Breton surnames have many spelling variations.  Latin and French, which were the official court languages, were also important on the spelling of surnames.  The spelling of surnames was rarely compatible in old times, and authors and church officials noted names as they sounded rather than adhering to any specific spelling rules.  Therefore, it was common to find the same individual associated to different spellings of their surname in the old records. Moreover, a large number of foreign names brought into England after the Norman Invasion, which stimulated and accentuated the alterations to the spelling of different surnames.  The name has spelled Bruton, Breton, Brutyn, Brutten, Brutone, Brewton, Brutown, Brewtowne, Bretown and much more.

Variations:
More common variations are: Brueton, Brutton, Brauton, Breuton, Brouton, Bruiton, Bruwton, Brutyon, Brutwon, Bruoton

England:
The surname Bruton first appeared in Somerset and Devon where in the latter district Auvrai le Breton held twenty-two lordships given to him by William the Champion for his service at Hastings in 1066 AD. Roger and Thomas le Breton, his followers, given Lordships in Somerset.  Bruton noted in the Domesday Book as Briwetone, and literally meant “farmstead on the River Brue,” the latter Celtic word meant “brisk.” Merged it meant, “farmstead on the brisk running river.”

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of William de Briweton (witness), dated about 1271, in the “Somerset Assize Court Records.”  It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272.  The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:
Many of the people with surname Bruton had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

 

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Bruton landed in the United States in the 17th century.  Some of the people with the name Bruton who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Bruton, aged 22, arrived in St Christopher in 1634.  William Bruton, his wife Mary, and his son Robert who settled in Barbados in 1635.  Jon Bruton, who landed in Virginia in 1635.  Edward Bruton, who arrived in Virginia in 1637.  Sarah Bruton, who landed in Maryland in 1662.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Bruton who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Charles Bruton, aged 32, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Prince Regent” in 1849.  Ellen Bruton, aged 32, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Prince Regent” in 1849.  James Bruton, aged 12, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Prince Regent” in 1849.  George Bruton, aged 10, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Prince Regent” in 1849.  William Bruton, aged 7, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Prince Regent” in 1849.

New-Zealand:
Some of the population with the surname Bruton who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included William Bruton, a baker, arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Sir George Grey” in 1864.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bruton:
United States 7,595; South Africa 1,607; England 1,576; Australia 841; Ireland 611; Canada 323; Philippines 258; Wales 226; Mexico 105; Scotland 92

Notable People:
John Bruton was an Irish Taoiseach, Ambassador of the European Union to the United States of America.
Richard Bruton was a Deputy Leader of Fine Gael and Opposition Spokesperson on Finance in Ireland.
Bill Bruton was a center fielder for the Milwaukee Braves.
Cal Bruton was a head coach of the West Sydney Razorbacks.
C. J. Bruton was a Basketball player with the New Zealand Breakers.

Bruton Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Exeter). Blazon: Per pale gules and azure a fesse between. two chevron argent (another, sable and gules). Crest— A demi wolf ducally crowned holding between. the paws a mule proper.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
8. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
9. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P31
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wolf