Carnell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Carnell Family Coat of Arms

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Carnell Coat of Arms Meaning

Carnell Name Origin & History

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Carnell Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Carnell blazon are the castle, crescent, chevron and bendlets. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Architectural items, from individual components to entire buildings 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92 feature frequently as charges In a coat of arms. Not surprisingly, considering the times from which many arms date, fortifications are common. The castle is perhaps second only to the tower in this usage, and often described in some detail as to its construction, the disposition of windows and so on. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Castle Continental examples also sometimes include attackers on scaling ladders. Wade tells us that the appearance of a castle indicates “granduer and solidity” and one can understand why. 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.13The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Carnell Name

Carnell Origin:

England, France

Origins of Carnell:

This unique name with different spellings, Carnell, Carnelley, Carbonell, and Cardinal, has two possible sources, the first of which is a professional name for a gunman whose expertise is in fighting from the battlements of manors. It derives from the Anglo-Norman French “carnel” which means fortification, indentation. The second origin may be a reduced form of the surnames Carbonell and Cardinal. Carbonell acquires from the Old French “carbon,” which means charcoal, a nickname for a person with a brown coloring or black hair as coal, the important quality of charcoal. The name was sometimes involved with the surname Cardinal and became Carnall. The surname Cardinal derives from the Old French “Cardinal,” Cardinal, the parish celebrity, a pageant name or a love name for a person like a cardinal or someone who frequently dressed in red. One Hugo de la Karnell shows in the Feet of Fines for Huntingdonshire, 1247. In September 1629, Andrew Carnall named in St. Mary’s, Whitechapel, Stepney, London.

Variations:

More common variations are: Carnelly, Carnwell, Carnello, Carnelli, Carnella, Carnelle, Carniell, Carnnell, Carrnell, Carwnell.

England:

The origins of the surname Carnell appeared in Devon where people held a family seat from early times. Someone say before the success of thee Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William de la Kernel, dated about 1244, in the “Cartulary of the Monastery in Ramsey,” Cambridgeshire. It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Carnell settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the individuals with the name Carnell who landed in the United States in the 17th century included Daniel Carnell, who landed in Maryland in 1678.

People with the surname Carnell who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Mary J. Carnell who emigrated to America, in 1895. G. Stanley Carnell landed in America, in 1896. Wm. Carnell settled in America, in 1897.

The following century saw many more Carnell surnames arrive. Some of the population with the surname Carnell who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Herbert Carnell emigrated to the United States from Hilgay, England, in 1908. George Carnell who moved to America from Honeton, England, in 1909. Hannah Carnell and Alfred Carnell, both landed in America from Hilgay, England, in 1910. Mrs. Hannah Carnell landed in America, in 1910.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Carnell who landed in Canada in the 20th century included Liesa Carnell moved to Carmenville, Newfoundland in 1908. Ethel Carnell landed in St. John’s, Newfoundland in 1922. Selby Carnell who shifted to Fogo, Newfoundland in 1924.

New-Zealand:

Some of the individuals with the surname Carnell who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included J. Carnell arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Ulcoats” in 1864.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Carnell: United States 2,869; England 1,608; Australia 574; South Africa 402; Canada 306; Wales 214; Scotland 66; New Zealand 64; France 61; Sweden 51.

Notable People:

Andrew Carnell (1877–1951), was a Canadian leader

Arthur Carnell (1862–1940), was a British sports shooter.

Bradley Carnell (born 1977), was a South African football player.

Edward John Carnell (1919–1967), was a Christian theologian.

Geoffrey Carnell (1915–1987), was a Newfoundland leader.

Ian Carnell (born 1955), was an Australian politician.

John Carnell (1912–1972), was a British composer.

Kate Carnell (born 1955), was an Australian leader.

Laura H. Carnell (1867–1929), was an American professor.

Richard S. Carnell (born 1953), was an American advocate.

Samuel Carnell (1832–1920), was a New Zealand leader.

Stanley Carnell (1903–1989), was a Canadian leader.

Carnell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Carnell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: (Ireland). Blazon: A cross engr. ar. in the first quarter a crescent of the last.
2) Notes: (Kent). Blazon: Ar. a bend sinister cotised sa. on a canton of the last a castle of the first.
3) Notes: (Yorkshire). Blazon: Ar. three bends wavy sa. on a canton of the last a tower triple-towered of the first. Crest—An arm embowed in armour holding a sword all ppr.
4) Notes: None. Blazon: Ar. three bends sa. on a canton of the second a castle of the first.
5) Notes: (co. Warwick, Har. MSS.). Blazon: Or, three chevrons vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Castle
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
13. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45