Carney Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Carney Family Coat of Arms

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Carney Coat of Arms Meaning

Carney Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Carnie, Carne.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Carney. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Carney Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Carney blazon are the buglehorn, pheon, lion rampant and pelican vulning herself. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, gules and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The hunting horn, or bugle horn has a distinctive shape, being curved almost into a semi-circle, it can be decorated with bands of a different colour and typically hangs from a string, also coloured. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:hunting horn. Apart from its obvious reference to the pursuit of hunting, it has also been used in allusion to the name of the holderr (HUNTER of Hunterston) and Woowward suggests it is also associated with those who have rights or obligations to the forest. 10A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P400

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Carney Name

Carney Origin:

Ireland

Origins of Name:

The surname of Carney is of Irish origins, and derives from the ancient Gaelic name O’ Catharnaigh, which translates to mean the male descendant of a warlike chief. The surname of Carney is specific to the Connacht province, and clustered specifically in County Mayo. The alternative spelling of Kearney is found in all four provinces. Another origin of the surname Carney is found in the Gaelic name O’ Cearnaigh, which derives from the word “cearnach” meaning to be victorious. It is said that the O’ Catharnaigh warlike chief was also nicknamed “Ai Sionnach” or “The Fox” which is another surmised meaning of this name.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Carney, Carny, Carnie, Cairney, Carrney, Careney, Cairney, Carneey, Carneay, Carneyi, Carnney, Caroney, Caarney

History:

Ireland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname Carney is in the year 1084, under the name of Tadhg O’ Catharnaigh, at Teffia in County Meath, Ireland, under the reign of King Turlough, King of Ireland, who ruled from the year 1072, to the year 1086. Other recordings of this name come through church records and surveys of this time period. Though these names have different spellings, it is important to note that this surname of Carney has derivatives in two different Gaelic words and surnames, and that the spelling varies due to location, as well as due to the phonetics and literacy ability of both the recorder and the person dictating their surname.

The next recording of someone with the surname of Carney in Ireland was in the christening of Mary Carney, who was the daughter of Edward and Mary Carney, on June 5th, 1664, in Dublin, Ireland, at St. Michas.

Another recording of this surname of Carney can be found in the marriage records of James Kearney and Catherine Martin on December 29th, 1794, at St. John’s Limerick.

In the 19th century, many Irish citizens and their families fled the country in order to escape the Irish Potato Famine. Among these Irish citizens who fled was James Corney, and his son, who was also named James Corney, who left the port of Liverpool, and boarded a ship headed to New York to escape the Irish Potato Famine. Corney and his son were among the first recorded people with the surname Carney, or it’s variant spellings, to emigrate to the New World. In the year, 1801, Thomas Carney arrived in America and settled there, and three years later, in the year of 1804, Nicholas Carney, who was nineteen years of age, Elinor Carney, who was sixteen years of age, and James Carney all settled in the city of Baltimore, Maryland. In that same year, the year of 1804, Martin Carney landed in the city of New York, New York. Many Irish settlers also emigrated to Australia, New Zealand, and Canada during the 19th century in order to escape the Irish Potato Famine, and search for a better life for them and their families, spreading the Carney surname further around the globe.

Carney Today:

United States 39,755

England 5,942

Australia 2,408

Ireland 1,561

South Africa 1,425

Canada 1,164

Germany 504

Scotland 256

Wales 226

New Zealand 211

Notable People:

Chris Carney (1980-2015) who was the singer for “The Prom Kings” from America

John Joseph Carney (1866-1925) who bore the nickname of “Handsome Jack” and was a MLB (Major League Baseball) player from the America

John Michael Carney (born in 1964) who was a former NFL (National Football League) placekicker from America

Christopher P. “Chris” Carney (born in 1959) who was a former Member of the U.S. House of Representative from the state of Pennsylvania in the year 2007 to the year 2011, and also was an American politician

Charles Joseph Carney (1913-1987) who was who was a U.S. Representative from Ohio in the year 1970 to the year 1979, and was an American politician

Alan Carney (1909-1973) who was an actor and comedian from America, and was born with the name David Boughal, but later changed his name to Alan Carney

C. S. Carney Jr., who was an Alternate Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Tennessee in the year 1936, and was an American Democratic politician

B. E. Carney, who was a former Member of the West Virginia State House of Delegates from Kanawha County in the year 1905, and was a politician from America

Andrew Carney, who was a former Alternate Delegate to the Republican National Convention from West Virginia in the year 1900, and also was a Republican politician from America

Charles Carney, who was the former Chair of the Schuyler County Democratic Party in the year 1942, and was an American Democratic politician

Carney Family Gift Ideas

Browse Carney family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. a chev. betw. three buglehorns stringed sa. Crest—A swan's head and neck erased, in the bill an annulet.
2) (Fun. Ent. of Lettice, dau. of Edward, son of Richard, son of Richard Carney, and wife of Hugh Ridgate, Councillor at Law, buried at St. Werburgh, Dublin, 11 July, 1671, and confirmed by St. George, Ulster, to Sir Richard Carney, Athlone, afterwards Ulster). Ar. three lions ramp. gu. on a chief az. a sphere betw. two pheons or. Crest—A gauntletted hand lying fessways holding a sword erect all ppr.
3) (Cashell, co. Tipperary; Fun. Ent., Ellen, wife of Edward Carney, d. 8 Jan., 1658). Ar. three lions ramp. gu. on a chief of the last a gauntletted hand couped at the wrist, holding a dagger betw. two pheons all or, quartering per pale or and sa. three lions’ gambs erased barways counterchanged. Crest—A gauntletted hand lying fessways holding a sword erect all or.
4) (Killmallock, co. Cork). Motto—Semper fidelis. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. armed and langued az. on a chief gu. three pheons or. Crest—A gauntletted hand ar. holding a sword ppr.
5) Erm. a chev. betw. three hunting horns strung sa. Crest—A hand fessways issuing from a cloud, and pointing to a crosier in pale all ppr.
6) (Nash, co. Glamorgan). (Ewenny, co. Glamorgan. The heiress m. Turberville). (Dimlands, co. Glamorgan). (St. Donats Castle, Bridgend). Mottoes—Above the shield, "En tout loyal," under the arms, "Fy ngobaith sydd yn nuw." Gu. a pelican on her nest with wings displ. or, feeding her young and vulning herself ppr. Crest—A pelican displ. with two heads sa. issuing from a ducal coronet ppr.
7) Or, three lions pass. sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:hunting horn
10. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P400
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141