Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Danemark - (An., 20 déc; 1748) Écartelé en sautoir de sable et d'azur au sautoir d'argent bordé d'or brochant sur le tout chaque quartier de sable ch d'une gerbe d'or et chaque quartier d'azur ch d'une tour d'argent ouverte et ajourée de sable Cimier une tour l'écu sommée d'une gerbe d'or. English: Per saltire sable and azure a saltire argent fimbriated [bordered] or covering over the partition, each sable quarter charged with a garbe [wheatsheaf] or and each azure quarter charged with a tower argent openings and portcullis sable Crest: a tower of the shield surmounted by a garbe [wheatsheaf] or.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Caspergaard Coat of Arms and Family Crest

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Caspergaard Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Caspergaard blazon are the garb and tower. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5.

Europe in the middle ages was still a largely agrarian society, and the wealth of the nobility resided in their estates and land. Since most people still lived and worked on the land they would find farm implements instantly recognisable, (an important feature for a coat of arms), even if they seem obscure to us today. 6 The garb for example is an ancient word for wheatsheaf, something now more frequently seen in Inn signs than in the field! 7

Architectural items, from individual components to entire buildings 8 feature frequently as charges In a coat of arms. Not surprisingly, considering the times from which many arms date, fortifications are common. The tower Is a typical example of an object from the world of architecture adopted, albeit in a stylised form, for use in heraldry. It can be placed alone, or frequently with three turrets on the top, known as a tower triple towered, and can have doors and windows of a different colour. 9 In continental European heraldry they are often accompanied by pictorial effects such as armoured knights scaling them on ladders.

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References

  • 1 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 4 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
  • 5 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 6 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86
  • 7 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe
  • 8 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92
  • 9 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Tower