Coles Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Coles Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Coles Coat of Arms Meaning

Coles Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Colles.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Coles. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

coles coat of arms

Coles Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Coles blazon are the leopard’s face, chevron and bezant. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and argent .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.12The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

Coles Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Coles Name

Coles Origin:

Origins of Clan:

Variations:

History:

Crest Origin:

Coles Today:

Coles Family Gift Ideas

Browse Coles family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More coles Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Ireland; confirmed 1648). Gu. on a chev. betw. two lions' heads erased or, ten ogresses. Crest—A snake wreathed about a marble pillar ppr. garnished or.
2) (Dorsetshire). Gu. a chev. (another, cotised) betw. three leopards' faces ar.
3) Per pale ar. and gu. a bull pass, counterchanged. Crest—An arm embowed in armour holding in the hand ppr. a serpent entwined round the arm vert.
4) (Preston Capes, co. Northampton). Gu. a chev. ar. pellettee with two bars gemelles of the field betw. three lions’ heads erased or.
5) (Parrocks Lodge, near Chard, co. Somerset). Ar. a bull gu. within a bordure sa. bezantee. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi dragon vert holding an arrow of the first, headed and feathered ar.
6) (Somersetshire). Gu. on a chev. betw. three leopards' heads ar. an ermine spot. Crest—On a mount vert an eagle displ. ar. ducally gorged and membered or.
7) (granted to James Coles, Esq., of Old Park, Clapham Common, co. Surrey). Gu. three bezants chevronways within two chevronels or, betw. three lions’ heads erased erminois. Crest—Upon a mount vert a column erect entwined by a serpent holding in the mouth a branch of olive all ppr.
8) (Somersetshire). Gu. on a chev. betw. three leopards' heads ar. an ermine spot. Crest—On a mount vert an eagle displ. ar. ducally gorged and membered or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
12. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122