Coltman Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Coltman Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Coltman Coat of Arms Meaning

Coltman Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Coltman. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

coltman coat of arms

Coltman Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Coltman blazon are the cross patonce, mullet and nag’s head. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, or and azure .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross patonce is typical of these, whereby each arm of the cross expands and ends in a bud-like projection. These cross variations are probably largely for decorative effect, and to differentiate the arms from similar ones and hence their significance is that of the Christian cross itself.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? Nevertheless, real animals 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 are perhaps one of the most common sights on coats of arms, especially animals of European origin. The horse Is a typical example of these.The Nagbeing an affectionate term for a less-than-pedigree horse!

Coltman Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Coltman Name

Coltman Origin:

England

Origins of Coltman:

This fascinating and unusual medieval English name is a dialectal alternative of a metonymic professional name, Colt, given to a person who looked after asses or horses. The origin is from the Old English pre 7th Century “Colt,” which means a young horse, next also a young ass. In Northern England “Colt” was the general word for working horses or asses. However, it is also possible that this could be a nickname surname for a lively, spirited, person. In the new era, the spelling alternatives contain Colter, Coltman, and the next Coldman, a late southern dialectal spelling. Examples of name ancestors contain as Anselm Colt in 1020 a.d, Henry Le Colt in the Stafford Assize Rolls of 1227, Robert Le Coltier of Oxford in 1285, Peter Colthird of York in 1301 and Anote Coltman in the Premium Rolls of Cumberland for 1332. The records as Coldman is possibly the 19th century, an example being Michael Coldman, noted at the parish of St Mary Magdalene, Bermondsey, in July 1833, in the period of King William 1V (1830 – 1837).

Variations:

More common variations are: Coultman, Coldman, Goltman, Caltman, Clotman, Koltman, Chitman, Clatman, Clutman, Coltmen.

England:

The surname Coltman first appeared in Lincolnshire where they held a family seat from very ancient times. Some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Godric Colt, dated about 1017, in the “Old English Bynames.” It was during the time of King Canute, dated 1016 – 1035. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Coltman had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Coltman who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Henry Coltman settled in Virginia in 1610. Henery Coltman, who came to Virginia in 1610. Ann Coltman, who landed in Virginia in 1620. Henry Coltman, who landed in Virginia in 1622. Mrs. Coltman, who arrived in Virginia in 1623.

Canada:

People with the surname Coltman settled in Canada in 18th. Some of the people with the surname Coltman who came to Canada in the 18th century included Sgt. John Coltman U.E. who settled in Home District, [Niagara], Lincoln Division, Ontario near the year 1783.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Coltman who landed in Australia in the 19th century included James Coltman arrived in Holdfast Bay, Australia aboard the ship “Africaine” in 1836. Marion Coltman also came in Holdfast Bay, Australia aboard the ship “Africaine” in the same year 1836. Charles Coltman arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Susannah” in 1849.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Coltman: South Africa 1,278; England 1,194; United States 399; Australia 234; Canada 192; Scotland 112;New Zealand 109;Spain 17; Ukraine 4; Switzerland 2.

Notable People:

Bob Coltman (born 1937), was an American musician.

Constance Coltman (1889–1969), was an English Congregational minister.

Sir Leycester Coltman (1938–2003), was a British representative.

Liam Coltman (born 1990), is a New Zealand rugby union player.

Robert Coltman (1862–1931), was an American physician.

William Harold Coltman (1891–1974), was an English winner of the Victoria Cross.

Coltman Family Gift Ideas

Browse Coltman family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More coltman Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Hagnaby Priory, co. Lincoln). (Naburn Hall, co. York). (Leicestershire, Yorkshire, and London). Az. a cross patonce pierced or, betw. four mullets ar. Crest—A nag's head, erased, sa., maned and bridled ar. tasselled, or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191