Cramp Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Cramp Family Coat of Arms

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Cramp Coat of Arms Meaning

Cramp Name Origin & History

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Cramp Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Cramp blazon are the cross crosslet fitchee, chevron and demi lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and argent .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.13The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The demi-lion is a variant of the typical creature shown only from the waist upward. It can take all same poses and attitudes of its fully represented brethren and often appears to be emerging from some other device such as a fess or chief. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion No special significance should be given to the demi appearance and it should be taken to have the same meanings and interpretations as the noble king of beasts itself.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Cramp Name

Cramp Origin:

England

Origins of Cramp:

A name with possible Huguenot connections, the origin, is either from Van Crimpe or Crimpen, both names being noted heraldically in Riestaffs Armorial General for the Netherlands, or from Olde English crump pre 10th Century. In the first example, the name is an old metonymic for a Linen worker, while the second is a nickname surname for a person with a crooked back or limbs. One John Cramp, an infant, named in St. Mary Whitechapel Stepney in 1599.

Variations:

More common variations are: Crampe, Crampo, Crampi, Craump, Crampy, Crampp, Crmp, Curampa, Crampoo, Crump.

England:

The surname Cramp first appeared in Worcestershire where they held a family seat from old times.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Walter Crampe, dated about 1200, in the “Carlularly of Oseney Abbey Oxford.” It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199- 1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Cramp had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Cramp landed in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th. Some of the people with the name Cramp who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Cramp, who came to Maryland in 1657. Peter Cramp, who came to Virginia in 1664.

People with the surname Cramp who landed in the United States in the 18th century included East Cramp settled in Virginia in 1741. Charles Cramp, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1765. John Cramp, who landed in North Carolina in 1767. John, Cramp Jr., who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1772.

People with the surname Cramp who landed in the United States in the 19th century included James Cramp, who arrived in New York in 1831. Samuel Cramp, who landed in New York, NY in 1846. F. Cramp, who emigrated to the United States, in 1892. Howard Cramp, who shifted to the United States from Liverpool, in 1892. J. Cramp, who settled in America from London, in 1892.

The following century saw more Cramp surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Cramp who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Walter J. Cramp, who emigrated to America, in 1903. W.S. Cramp, aged 5, who emigrated to the United States, in 1903. Mrs. Walter S. Cramp, who moved to the United States, in 1903. Francis Cramp, aged 21, who emigrated to America, in 1906. Arthur L. Cramp, aged 20, who landed in America from Coventry, England, in 1907

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Cramp who came to Canada in the 20th century included F. H. Cramp, who moved to Toronto, in 1907. Harold Cramp, who settled in Toronto, Canada, in 1909. Mary Cramp, who settled in Newfoundland, in 1909. Reginald Cramp, who settled in Toronto, Canada, in 1909. Rose Cramp, who settled in Toronto, Canada, in 1909.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Cramp who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Julia Maria Cramp, English convict from Sussex, who was transported aboard the “Arab” in December 1835, settling in Van Diemen‘s Land, Australia. William Cramp arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship “Medina.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Cramp who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included William Cramp and Hannah Cramp, both arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Celestial Queen” in 1872.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Cramp: England 1,226; Australia 969; United States 60; Canada 336; South Africa 73; New Zealand 66; Ireland 49; Wales 45; Spain 30; Scotland 26.

Notable People:

Charlie Cramp (1876–1933), was a British trade unionist.

Stanley Cramp (1913–1987), was a British ornithologist.

Rosemary Cramp (1926– ), is a British scientist.

Sid Cramp was an Australian political leader.

Cramp Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Dudinghurst, co. Essex). Az. a chev. ar. betw. six crosses crosslet fitchee or.
2) Motto—Fide et amore. Az. a chev. betw. three mullets or. Crest—A demi lion ramp. gu. holding a mullet or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
13. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion