Crawley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Crawley Family Coat of Arms

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Crawley Coat of Arms Meaning

Crawley Name Origin & History

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Crawley Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Crawley blazon are the crane, pear, fleur-de-lis and bend. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and argent .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The crane, heron and stork are commonly to be found on a coat of arms but all tend to share the same stylised appearance 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164. Guillim reckons the stork to the “emblem of filial duty” and also the “symbol of a grateful man”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The spear or lance is a typical example, often borne (for obvious reasons) in allusion to the crucifixtion. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111 Sometimes only the head is shown, and on other occasions the tilting or tournament spear is specified, familiar to us from many a jousting scene in the movies. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spear

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Crawley Name

Crawley Origin:

England, Ireland

Origins of Crawley:

The surname of Crawley has derivative roots in both the countries and cultures of England and Ireland. There are two possible sources of the surname of Crawley. The first possible source of the surname of Crawley is that it is a locational surname. This means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Crawley, the locations associated with the surname itself are found in England. The surname itself derives from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “crawe” which can be translated to mean “crow,” combined with the element of “leah” which can be translated to mean “wood,” or “clearing.” This means that the surname of Crawley could also be topographical. A topographical surname is used to describe someone who lived on or near a residential landmark. This landmark could be either man made or natural, and would have been easily identifiable in the area from which it hailed, thus making the people who lived near it easily distinguished. In the case of the surname of Crawley, the original bearers of the surname could have been those who lived near a clearing. The second possible source of the surname of Crawley is that it is a Anglicization of the Gaelic surname of “O’Cruadhlaoich,” which itself hails from the descendants of “Cradhlaoch,” a personal name comprised of the elements, “cruadh,” which can be translated to mean “harsh,” or “difficult,” and “laoch,” which can be translated to mean “hero.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Crawaley, Craawley, Carawley, Corawley, Crawly, Crawle, Crwley, Crawleii, Crowley

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Crawley can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Pagan de Craweleia was mentioned in the document known as the Pipe Rolls of Berskshire in the year of 1130. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry I, who was commonly referred to throughout the ages as one “The Lion of Justice.” King Henry I of England ruled from the year of 1100 to the year of 1135.

Ireland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Crawley within the country of Ireland was one Cruadhlaoch, who was an immigrant to a territory near Durmanway, which is located in County Cork. Today, this surname is found to be very rare within County Roscommon, and is mainly found in the area of West Cork. Another mentions of the surname of Crawley in Ireland was one Cornelius Crowley, who was wed one named Joanna McDonald at St. Munchin, which is located in County Limerick, in the year 1766, on March 11th.

 

Here is the population distribution of the last name Crawley: United States 14,430; England 6,114; Australia 1,809; Canada 1,375; South Africa 1,169; Scotland 545; Ireland 420; New Zealand 400; Northern Ireland 262; Wales 226

Notable People:

Tyrone Crawley (born in 1958) who is a professional boxer from the United States of America

Sylvia Crawley (born in 1972) who is a basketball player from the United States of America

Ben Crawley (born in 1971) who is a soccer player from the United States of America, who played from the year of 1990 to the year of 2000, and who was a member of both the U-16 and the U-20 National Teams

W.B. Crawley, who served as the Mayor of Lamesa, Texas in the year of 1955, and who was a politician from America

Samuel Crawley (1780-1862) who served as a Member of Parliament for Honiton from the year of 1818 to the year of 1826, and who also served as a Member of Parliament for Bedford from the year of1832 to the year of 1837 and again in the year 1838 to the year of 1841, and who also served as the High Sheriff of Bedfordshire in the year of 1817, and who was a Whig and Liberal politician from the country of England

John Crawley (born in 1971) who is a retired cricketer from the country of England who played from the year of 1990 to the year of 2002

Ian Crawley (1962-2008) who was a footballer from the country of England

Crawley Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three cranes az.
2) (Nether Crawley, and Stockwood Park, co. Bedford). Or, on a fesse gu. betw. three storks ppr. as many crosses crosslet of the field; quartering, ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three cinquefoils of the second as many bezants, for Edgerly. Crest—A crane ppr. holding in the talon a fleur-de-lis or. Motto—Mihi coelum portus.
3) (co. Dorset). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three pears az. Crest—A lion’s head erased semee de hurts gorged with a ducal coronet gu.
4) (London). Sa. a lion pass., guard, betw. three mullets ar.
5) Ar. a chev. vert betw. three cranes (another, herons) az.
6) (impaled as a quartering by Leonard Perrott, of Drayton, co. Oxford, who m. Dorothy, dau. of Thomas Skipwirth, of St. Albans, co. Herts). Gu. on a fesse or, three fleurs-de-lis az.
7) Vert on a chev. or, a star of eight points betw. two roses gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spear
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489