Dane Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Dane Family Coat of Arms

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Dane Coat of Arms Meaning

Dane Name Origin & History

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Dane Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Dane blazon are the serpent, hind, chevron and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and sable .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The serpent Is a typical example of a mythical creature, as real to a person of the middle ages as dogs, cats and elephants are to us today.

Many different forms of the deer, hart, roe-buck and other appear in rolls of arms, though often of similar appearance. The precise choice of animal possibly being a reference to the family name. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer If there is any symbology intended it is probably that of enjoyment of the hunt, deer in all its form being a popular prey. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.14The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Dane Name

Dane Origin:

England

Origin of Dane:

This surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a geographical name for a resident of the Dale, acquiring from the Olde English pre 7th Century word “denu” which means “dale.” Geographical surnames were created in very early times, and were given as easily identifiable names in the small areas of the Middle Ages. The surname sometimes goes back to the early 14th Century. More recordings of the name consist of one Simon Dann (1332), “The premium Rolls of Sussex.” Differentiation in the phrase of the spelling of name consists of Dan, Dane, Danne, etc. Margery Dane married Jam’s Empsun in November 1539, at St. Stephen, Coleman Street, London. Dorothey Danne married Steven Willsy at St. Matthew’s, Friday Street, in August 1562, and Thomas Dann married Jone Gryphyn at St. Margaret’s, Westminster, in April 1591. While John Dan was listed in the Death records of the church of St. Michael’s, Barbados, in July 1678. Rose Dann at the age of twenty years, who was a famine traveler, moved from Liverpool aboard the “Mersey” bound for New York in May 1846.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Deane, Daine, Doane, Daney, Duane, Danne, Dayne, Dahne, Dwane, Diane.

England:

The surname Dane first was found in Sussex where they held a family seat from very early times.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Geoffrey atte Danne which was dated 1327, in the “Premium Rolls of Sussex.” It was during the time of King Edward III, who was known to be the “The Father of the Navy,” 1327 – 1377. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Dane who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas and William Dane; both shifted to the same area in 1635. Yoragh Dane landed in Virginia in 1635. John Dane who shifted from Essex, England, to Roxbury, Massachusetts, in 1636. Eustace Dane settled in Virginia in 1652.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Dane who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Daniel Dane U.E. who settled in Charlotee Division, New Brunswick near the year 1784; he was part of the Cape Ann Association. Mr. Luther Dane U.E., “Dana” who settled in Charlotee Division, New Brunswick near the year 1784, he was also a part of the Cape Ann Association.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Dane who settled in Australia in the 19th century included John Dane at the age of 23, arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Admiral Boxer.”

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Dane who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included H. Dane arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Nimroud” in 1860.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Dane: India 6,707; United States 3,816; Philippines 1,353; Turkey 1,153; England 1,081; Cameroon 793; Germany 572; Netherlands 545; Morocco 537; France 514.

Notable People:

Alexandra Dane (born 1946), is a South African actress, who performed in many movies such as Carry on Doctor, Carry on Loving, and other Carry on films, The Ups and Downs of a Handyman, Le Pétomane, and Terry Gilliam’s Jabberwocky.

Barbara Dane (born 1927), is an American musician who wrote “Bessie Smith in stereo,” and wrote as a jazz critic in late 1950s.

Claire Danes (born 1979), is an American film, television, and theater performer.

Dana Dane is an American hip-hop artist.

Eric Dane (born 1972), is an American actor. After appearing in television roles since the year 2000, he was famous for playing Dr. Mark “McSteamy” Sloan on the medical drama television series Grey’s Anatomy, and as well as movies, co-starring in Marley & Me (2008), Valentine’s Day (2010), and Burlesque (2010).

Francis Dane (1615-1697), was an administrator in colonial Massachusetts among the Salem Witch Trials.

Jordan Dane (born 1953), was an American novel writer.

Joseph Dane (1778-1858), was an American leader from Maine

Karl Dane (1886-1934), was a Danish-American silent film actor.

Lloyd Dane (1925-2015), was an American race car driver.

Maxwell Dane (1906-2004), was an American advertising chief.

Nathan Dane (1752–1835), was an American attorney.

Patricia Dane (1919-1995), was an American film performer.

Dane Family Gift Ideas

Browse Dane family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Wells, co. Somerset). Sa. a serpent entwined and erect ar. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi lizard vert.
2) (Stortford, co. Hereford. William Dane, Alderman of London, son of John Dane, of the former place. Visit. London, 1568). Or, a chev. engr. az. betw. three hinds pass. gu. Crest—A wolf statant ar.
3) Gu. on a bend cotised ar. three birds vert.
4) (Dane Court, co. Kent). Gu. four fleurs-de-lis or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
14. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45