Dangerfield Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Dangerfield Family Coat of Arms

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Dangerfield Coat of Arms Meaning

Dangerfield Name Origin & History

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Dangerfield Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Dangerfield blazon are the cinquefoil and bezant. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, azure and or .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Dangerfield Name

Dangerfield Origin:

England

Origins of Dangerfield:

This interesting surname, now appeared mainly in the West Midlands, is a geographical name from any of the regions in Normandy called Angerville (with the mixed preposition de), acquiring from the Old particular Norse name “Asgeirr”, from, “as” which means “God”, and “geirr”, which means weapon, and the Old French “ville” which means”agreement” or “Hamlet”. The name was first brought into England by the supporters of William the Conqueror, after the Norman conquest of 1066. The surname is sometimes dated back to the mid-12th Century, and other previous recordings such as William de Angeruill, in the 1205 Pipe Rolls of Dorset. Documentation from the London Parish Records contain the naming of Samuel, son of Richard Dangerfield, in March 1611, at St. Mary Abchurch, the christening of Richard Dangerfield in November 1616, at St. Thomas the Apostle and the naming of Sybil, daughter of Robert Dangerfield, in April 1625, at St. Martin Orgar and St. Clement Eastcheap. One Walcup Dangerfield, a traveler to the New World, moved from London aboard the “Bachelor” bound for Bristol in May 1679.

Variations:

More common variations are: Dangerfieled, Dangierfield, Dangerfieldt, Danigerfeld, Dangerfeild, Dangerfueld.

England:

The surname Dangerfield first appeared in Dorset where they held a family seat as kings of the castle. After the invasion of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having overcome to King Harold, given most of Britain to his many winning champions.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of William de Angeruill, dated about 1250, in the “pipe rolls of Dorest.” It was during the time of King John, who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199-1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Dangerfield had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Dangerfield settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. People with the name Dangerfield who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Wartus Dangerfield, who settled in Barbados in 1661. John Dangerfield, who came to Maryland in 1663. Rose Dangerfield, who landed in Maryland in 1669. James Dangerfield, who came to Virginia sometime between 1689 and 1698.

People with the surname Dangerfield who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Elizabeth Dangerfield, who settled in Pennsylvania in 1719. Richard Dangerfield, who arrived in Virginia in 1732

The following century saw many more Dangerfield surnames come. Some of the people with the name Dangerfield who came to the United States in the 19th century included W. P. Dangerfield, who came to San Francisco in 1850. Benjamin Dangerfield, who arrived in Allegheny Co, Pennsylvania in 1872. Edward Dangerfield, who came to Illinois in 1880.

Canada:

People with the surname Dangerfield who settled in Canada in the 19th century included I. F. Dangerfield, who came to Toronto in 1871. F. Dangerfield, who arrived in Ontario in 1871. C. Dangerfield, who arrived in Quebec in 1884.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Dangerfield who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Samuel Dangerfield, English prisoner from Nottingham, who shifted aboard the “Ann” in August 1809, settling in New South Wales, Australia. James Dangerfield was an English prisoner from Warwick, who moved aboard the “Asia” in October 1824, settling in New South Wales, Australia.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Dangerfield: United States 3,463; England 1,285; Australia 667; Canada 201; South Africa 164; Germany 134; New Zealand 83; Wales 56; Ireland 38; Isle of Man 21.

Notable People:

Chris Dangerfield, (born 1955), was an English football player.

Fyfe Dangerfield (born 1980), was an English composer and singer with Guillemots.

Joseph Dangerfield (born 1977), was an American singer.

George Dangerfield (1904–1986), was an English-American scholar.

Gordon Dangerfield, (born 1885), was an Australian football player.

Grahame Dangerfield was a British naturalist.

Dangerfield Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Bromyard, co. Worcester). Gu. a cinquefoil erm. within a bordure az. bezantee. Crest—A griffin’s head erased ppr.
2) Same Arms. Crest—A savage’s head wreathed about the temples with laurel leaves ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122