Davis Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Davis Family Coat of Arms

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Davis Coat of Arms Meaning

Davis Name Origin & History

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Davis Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Davis blazon are the mullet, cinquefoil, chevron and boar’s head. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.14The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Davis Name

Davis Origin:

England, Wales

Origins of Name:

The surname of Davis is itself a patronymic surname form of the given name of David. The given personal name of David derives from the Hebrew word “Dodaveha” which can be translated to mean “Beloved of Jehovah.” This given name gained popularity when it was adopted by the greatest of the kings of Israel, and thus became popular among the Jewish population of that area. The Christians later adopted this name because of its biblical connotations, and brought it to the areas of Europe during the Middle Ages. The patronymic form of this surname was created in Europe in the early 14th Century because of the popularity of the given name of David.

Variations:

More common variations are: Davies, Davise, Daveis, Deavis, Davios, Daivis, Duavis, D’Avis, Davias, Daviss

History:

Wales:

This surname gained popularity in Wales due to St. David, 6th Century Bishop of Menevia, who became the patron saint of Wales. Thus many people began to name their children David, and the patronymic form “son of David” evolved into the surname Davis.

Scotland:

The surname of Davis became popular in the country of Scotland due to both King David 1, who reigned from the year 1124 to the year 1153, and King David II, who ruled from the year 1329 to the year 1371. Many people began to name their children David after these kings, increasing the possibility for the patronymic surname to be widespread in this country.

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Davis was found in the country of England. One person who was given the name of John Dauisse was named in the Subsidy Rolls of Cambridgeshire in the year 1327. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of King Edward III, who was known as, and commonly referred to throughout history as “The Father of the Navy” and ruled from the year 1327 to the year 1377. Other mentions of the surname of Davis include Richard Barrett Davis, who lived from the year 1782 to the year 1852, and was the animal painter for William IV. Sir John Francis Davis was the Chief Superintendent of British trade in China, and was appointed the K.C.B. in the year 1854.

United States of America:

During the 1600’s, European settlers began to migrate to the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as The New World, or The Colonies. This movement was referred to as The European Migration, and lasted from the 17th Century to the 19th Century, spanning over four countries. The first person who bore the surname of Davis that was recorded to land on American soil was one Dolor Davis, who arrived in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the year 1634. Shortly after, Isbell Davis arrived in Virginia in the year 1635, and Dorothy Davis followed suit and also landed in the state of Virginia just one year later, in 1636. That same year, Christopher Davis settled in Massachusetts, and Jenkin Davis landed in Lynn, Massachusetts in the year 1637. It was over sixty years for the next person bearing this surname of Davis to arrive in the United States of America. This could be due to poor recording of those who arrived in the country, or could also be due to the poor living conditions on the transport ships. Many people died en route to the United States of America because of the living conditions in the cramped ships.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Davis: United States 1,172,346; England 69,849; Australia 41,221, Canada 32,926; Uganda 24,645; South Africa 21,551; Nigeria 21,244; Jamaica 16,384; Liberia 14,919; Ghana 10,624

Notable People:

Dennis Davis (died in 2016) who was a drummer and session musician from America, who was most notably recognized for his work with David Bowie

Howard Edward Davis Jr. (1956-2015) who was a two-time gold medalist amateur and professional boxer

Richard E. Davis (1926-2015) who was a businessman and child psychiatrist from America, and was the inventor of KC Masterpiece BBQ Sauce

Viola Davis (born in 1965) who is an Academy Award and Golden Globe nominee, Primetime Emmy Award winning actress and producer, and was the first African-American woman to be awarded an Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series

Shannon Davis (1969-1988) who was a student from Shelton, Connecticut, who was aboard the Pan Am Flight 103 from Frankfurt to Detroit, which is known as the Lockerbie Bombing in 1988, and died in the crash

Mrs. Mary Davis, who was a passenger from Chicago, Illinois aboard the American Airlines Flight 191 and died in the crash on May 25, 1979

Mrs. Pat Davis who was a passenger from Asheville, North Carolina aboard the American Airlines Flight 191 and died in the crash on May 25, 1979

Davis Family Gift Ideas

Browse Davis family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Hollywood, co. Gloucester, bart.). Motto—Utili secernere honestum. The augmentation of the Indian Spear in the crest commemorates an heroic achievement of Sir John Davis's father, the late Samuel Davis, Esq., member of the Board of Revenue in Bengal. In 1799, after the massacre of the Political Resident at Benares, he defended his house for upwards of an hour and a-half, armed with a spear only, and posted in a narrow staircase, single handed, against the treacherous attack of the usurper, Vizier Ali, and his forces, and “thus saved the settlement, by giving time for the cavalry, which were quartered at Beetabur, about ten miles from Benares, to reach Secrole, and oblige Vizier Ali to retire with his followers.” Ar. a chev. nebuly betw. three mullets in chief and another in base pierced sa. Crest—Two Indian pikes in saltire ppr. surmounted by a mullet pierced sa. betw. two wings vair ar. and sa.
2) (Bristol). Gu.a chev. erm. in chief two mounds or, in base a talbot pass, of the last. Crest—Two arms embowed, habited erm. cuffs az. hands ppr. supporting a mound, as in the arms.
3) (co. Kent; allowed June, 1772). Az. a wolf saliant erm. Crest—A wolf pass. erm.
4) (co. Kent). Or, a cross botonnee in saltire betw. four eagles displ. sa.
5) (London and Westminster; granted 1746). Per bend sinister erm. and ermines a lion ramp. reguard. erminois; on a chief az. three mullets of six points ar. Crest—A demi wolf ramp, reguard. and erased az. ducally collared and chained or, holding in the paws a mullet, as in the arms.
6) (co. Salop). Gu. a chev. betw. three boars’ heads couped ar.
7) Per fesse ar. and sa. in chief two towers of the second. Crest—A leopard’s head erased ppr.
8) Gu. a chev. betw. three boars’ heads erased ar. Crest—A boar’s head erased ppr.
9) Sa. a fesse or, betw. three cinquefoils ar. Crest—A lion’s head erased or, ducally crowned gu.
10) Sa. a fesse betw. three cinquefoils pierced erm.
11) Ar. on a bend az. cotised gu. three doves or.
12) Gu. a chev. engr. betw. three boars’ heads erased ar.
13) Az. a fesse erm. betw. three unicorns’ heads erased ar. Crest—Three arrows, two in saltire and one in pale ppr.
14) (co. Hereford). Az. a wolf saliant ar. charged on the breast with a quatrefoil gu. (another, a cinquefoil). Crest—Out of a mural coronet ppr. a demi wolf saliant ar. holding a quatrefoil gu.
15) (Leytonstone, co. Essex). Motto—Decide. Ar. a chev. pean, in base a lion ramp. sa. a chief indented of the last, and a canton ermines. Crest—A demi lion issuant sa. charged on the shoulder with the fasces or, betw. the paws a bomb fired ppr.
16) (originally co. Salop, afterwards Fenton House, Hampstead Heath). Gu. a chev. betw. three boars' heads couped ar. Crest—A fawn couchant.
17) (Kill, co. Kildare; Fun. Ent. of Gerrote Davis, of that place, d. 2 May, 1619, son of John Davis, Esq., of same place). Sa. on a chev. ar. three treloils slipped vert.
18) (Kill, co. Kildare; Fun. Ent. of Lawrence, third son of John Davis, of that place, buried at St. Andeous, 8 April, 1634). Same Arms, a martlet for diff.
19) (Viscount Mount Cashell Sir Paul Davis or Davys, Knt., of St. Katherine's, co. Dublin, and Kill, co. Kildare, was so created in the peerage of Ireland, 1706, extinct 1736). Same Arms. Crest—A dragon’s head erased vert. Supporters—Two leopards guard, cowarded ppr.
20) (Fun. Ent. of Sir William Davis, Lord Chief Justice, King’s Bench, Ireland, d. 24 Sept. 1687). Same Arms, a martlet for diff. Crest—A wyvern’s head erased vert.
21) (Reg. Ireland, to Major Thomas Davis). Sa. a fess or, betw. three cinquefoils ar. on a chief of the second three arrow heads gu. Crest—A cubit dexter arm in armour embowed, the hand holding a battle axe all ppr.
22) (Reg. Ireland). Ar. on a bend gu. betw. two caltraps sa. three cinquefoils or. Crest—A nag's head couped ar. charged on the neck with caltraps sa.
23) (Ireland, borne by Hercules Davis, Esq.). Gu. a chev. betw. three boars' heads couped ar. Crest—A boar ramp. ar.
24) (J. N. C. Atkins Davis, Surgeon-Major Royal Artillery, H.P. Deputy Inspector of Army Hospitals, eldest son of the late James Thomas Davis, Esq., Surgeon Royal Artillery and Acting Deputy-lnspector of Ordnance Hospitals in the Peninsula). Motto—I will. Gu. a chev. ar. in chief three battle axes, in base a human heart, guttee de sang, pierced with a dagger, all of the second. Crest—A dexter mailed arm holding a scimitar ppr.
25) (Sir John Davis, Attorney-General for Ireland, 1606). Sa. a fess erm. betw. three cinquefoils pierced ar.
26) (Reg. in Ireland to Major Thomas Davis, temp. Charles II.) Sa. a fess or, betw. three cinquefoils ar. on a chief of the second three caltraps gu. Crest—An arm in armour embowed, the hand gauntletted holding a battle axe all ppr.

1 Comment

  • Missick Davis says:

    There are Davis mention from all parts of the world but i have yet to see any Davis from the Bahama islands mention. There are thousands of Davis people living here in today’s world. How can we find out our origins? George Davis came to the Bahamas in the late 1600’s.from New York with the Loyalist. ,

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
14. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45