Douglas Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Douglas Family Coat of Arms

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Douglas Coat of Arms Meaning

Douglas Name Origin & History

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Douglas Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Douglas blazon are the heart and mullet. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The heart is represented by the conventional symbol that we see today on playing cards. In later arms it can also appear emflamed and crowned. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Heart Guillim, the 17th century heraldic author, believes that it shows the holder to be a “man of sincerity…who speaks truth from his heart”. 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P184

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Douglas Name

Douglas Origin:

Scotland, England

Origins of Douglas:

The surname of Douglas can be traced to a locational territory in the country of Scotland. Since the surname of Douglas is locational, this means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Douglas, the areas from which the name hails can be found within the lands of Douglas, which were south of the city of Glasgow, which is located in the county of Lanarkshire, called the Douglas Water. This surname derived from the Old Gaelic word of “dubh” which can be translated to mean “dark,” or “black,” and the element of “glas” which can be translated to mean “a stream,” or “a rivulet.” Thus, the surname of Douglas can be translated to mean “a dark stream.” The surname of Douglas can also be considered topographical. This means that this surname was given to someone who lived on or near a man-made or natural structure. This structure would have been a notable landmark or area within a town or village, thus making it distinguishable to those who hailed from this area. Thus, the surname of Douglas might have been given to someone who lived on the bank of, or near a dark stream.

Variations:

More common variations are: Douglass, Dougllas, Douglasi, Dougalas, Dougleas, Douglaas

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Douglas can be traced to the country of Scotland. One person, who was recorded to bear the surname of Douglas, was named as one William de Duglas, who was mentioned in the document entitled the Records of Kelso Abbey, which was located n Roxburghshire, Scotland in the year of 1175. William de Duglas was mentioned as a charter witness in the area of Kelso. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King William of Scotland, who was known throughout the ages, and commonly referred to as “The Lion of Scotland.” King William I of Scotland ruled from the year of 1165 to the year of 1214. Other mentions of the surname of Douglas within the country of Scotland include one Douglas of Douglasdale, who was known as “The Black Douglas,” and who was close to Mary, Queen of Scots. Another mention of the surname of Douglas within the country of Scotland is one Sir James Douglas, who was known as “the good,” and who was said to have made the journey to the Holy Land while carrying the heart of the dead Robert Bruce. Sir James Douglas lived from the year 1286 to the year 1330. Those who carry the surname of Douglas within the country of Scotland can be found in large concentrations in the areas of Midlothian and Lanarkshire.

United States of America:

Those who carry the surname of Douglas can be found within the United States of America. Those people can be found in Ohio, Texas, Missouri, California, Michigan, Illinois, Tennessee, New York, and in Pennsylvania.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Douglas: United States 110,930; Brazil 33,707; England 23,048; Nigeria 22,925; Australia 12,218; Canada 13,188; South Africa 9,589; Jamaica 7,175; Scotland 6,228; Uganda 5,041

Notable People:

David Glenn Douglas (1963-2016) who was an offensive lineman from America for the National Football League

Diana Douglas (1923-2015) who was born with the name Diana Love Dill and who was born in Bermuda but was an actress in America who also worked in comedy and who was married to Kirk Douglas and whose children are Michael Douglas and Joel Douglas

Kirk Douglas (1916) who was born in the year 1916 with the name Issur Danielovitch is and actor and film producer from America whose work on ending the Hollywood blacklist awarded him with the Presidential Medal of Freedom

Jesse Douglas (1897-1965) who was a mathematician from America who was one of the first recipients of a Fields Medal in the year 1936

James Henderson Douglas Jr. (1899-1988) who was a lawyer from America who was also a high level officer in the United States Government and who also served as the Assistant Secretary of the Treasury and as the United States Deputy Secretary of Defense from the year 1959 to the year 1961

Douglas Family Gift Ideas

Browse Douglas family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (William, first Earl of Douglas, and nephew of "Good Sir James," who was slain in Andalusia, on his way to Palestine with the heart of Robert Bruce). Ar. a man’s heart gu. on a chief az. three stars of the first.
2) (first and second Earls of Douglas, who were also Earls of Mar). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, as the last; 2nd and 3rd, az. a bend betw. six crosses crosslet fitchee or, for Mar.
3) (Archibald, third Earl of Douglas, natural son of “Good Sir James”). Supporters—Two savages ppr. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Douglas, as above; 2nd and 3rd, az. a lion ramp. ar. crowned or, for the lordship of Galloway; en surtout, az. three stars or, for Murray of Bothwell.
4) (Archibald, fifth Earl of Douglas and second Duke of Touraine, who fell at Verneuil). Quarterly, 1st, az. three fleurs-de-lis or, for France; 2nd, Douglas, as the last; 3rd, az. a lion ramp. ar. crowned or, for Galloway; 4th, ar. a saltire and chief gu., for Annandale.
5) (James, ninth and last Earl of Douglas). Quarterly, 1st, Douglas, as above; 2nd, sa. fretty or, for the Lordsbip of Lauderdale; 3rd, az. three stars or, for Murray, of Bothwell; 4th, or, six piles gu. for Brechin; en surtout, az. a lion ramp. ar. crowned or, for Galloway. Crest—A wolf sejant ppr. Supporters—Two savages with clubs in their exterior hands ppr.
6) (Archibald, third son of the seventh Earl of Douglas, Earl of Moray, by marriage with the Countess Mary Dunbar). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, three cushions pendent within a double tressure flory counterflory gu., for Moray; 2nd and 3rd, erm. a man’s heart gu. in chief az. three mullets ar., for Douglas. Crest—A peacock’s head issuing from a tower ppr. Supporters—Two savages with clubs in their exterior hands ppr.
7) (Drumlanrig, co. Dumfries, now Marquis of Queensberry; descended from Sir William, natural son of James, second Earl of Douglas and Mar, 1633 Earl, 1682 Marquis, and 1684 Duke of Queensberry; the dukedom, in virtue of a. new patent of 1706, went, in 1810, to the Duke of Buccleuch, as heir of line). Original Arms: Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Douglas; 2nd and 3rd, Mar, all within a bordure engr. gu. (About 1542, the heart in the Douglas coat is ensigned with an open crown gu., this being the earliest appearance of the crown in the insignia of any of the Douglas family). Arms borne by the first marquis in virtue of a royal warrant—Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a man’s heart gu. ensigned with an imperial crown ppr. on a chief az. three stars of the field; 2nd and 3rd, Mar, all within a bordure or, charged with a double tressure flory counterflory gu. Crest—A heart gu. winged and ensigned with an imperial crown or. Motto—Forward. Supporters—Two pegasi ar. winged or.
8) (Earl of March. The first earl was second son of the third Duke of Queensberry, the third earl became fourth Duke of Queensberry). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, the quartered coat of Queensberry; 2nd and 3rd, gu. a lion ramp. ar. within a bordure of the last, charged with eight roses of the first. Crest and Motto, as Duke of Queensberry. Supporters —Dexter, a pegasus ar. winged or; sinister, a lion ar.
9) (Kellhead, co. Dumfries, bart. 1668. The sixth bart. succeeded to the Marquisate of Queensberry in 1810). Motto—Forward. Quarterly, Douglas and Mar, all within a bordure engr. gu. charged with eight bezants. Crest—A man's heart ppr. powdered with bezants and crowned and winged or.
10) (Cavers, co. Roxburgh; first of the line, a natural son of James, second Earl of Douglas and, Mar). Motto—Do or die. Ar. a man’s heart gu. on a chief az. three stars ar. within a bordure of the third. Crest—A dexter hand holding a broken, lance in bend ppr.
11) (Friarshaw and Springwood Park, co. Roxburgh, bart., 1786; the third bart. m. the heiress of Scott, of Belford, and the family now take the name of Scott before Douglas). Mottoes—1st, Douglas: Do or die; 2nd, Scott: Pro patria. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a man’s heart gu. imperially crowned or, on a chief az. three mullets or, a bordure nebuly of the fourth; 2nd and 3rd, or, on a bend az. a star of six points betw. two crescents of the first, in dexter chief a sword in pale ppr. Crests—1st, Douglas: A dexter hand holding a broken lance in bend ppr.; 2nd, Scott: A lion’s head erased ppr.
12) (James Douglas, Lieut.-Col., Scots Foot Guards, 1696). Motto—Forward. 1st and 4th, Douglas; 2nd and 3rd, Mar; in the centre a crescent chequy, and all within a bordure compony gu. and ar. Crest—A man’s heart gu. crowned and winged or, charged with a crescent chequy.
13) (Earl of Angus, 1389; the first earl, son of William, first Earl of Douglas, by Margaret Stewart, Counten of Angus and Mar; Marquis of Douglas 1633. Duke of Douglas, 1703; Dukedom expired in 1761, when the Marquisate went to the Duke of Hamilton, descended from Lord William Douglas, created Duke of Hamilton for life, and Anne, Duchess of Hamilton). As borne by Archibald "Bell-the-cat," fifth Earl of Angus. Quarterly, 1st, ar. a lion ramp, gu., for Angus; 2nd, or, a lion ramp. gu. surmounted of a ribbon sa., for Abernethy; 3rd, erm. three chrevonels gu., for Liddesdale; 4th, sa. fretty or, for Lauderdale en surtout, ar. a man's heart gu. on a chief az. three stars of the first, for Douglas. Crest—A peacock's head ppr. Supporters—A lady leaning against a tree ppr. and a hart ppr. gorged and chained or, the whole surmounted by a compartment representing a park enclosed by a wreathed fence ppr.
14) Arms recorded, 1672, for James, second Marquis of Douglas.Motto—Jamais arrirere. The first marquis was the first who crowned the heart in the Douglas coat: his arms differed from those of the second in as far as he bore on a, base ar. a cross counter-embattled sa., for Auchinleck. Quarterly, 1st, az. a lion ramp. ar. crowned or, for Galloway; 2nd, or, a lion ramp. gu. debruised by a ribbon sa., for Abebnethy; 3rd, ar. three piles gu. for Brechin; 4th, or, a fess chequy az. and ar. surmounted by a bend sa. charged with three buckles of the field, for Stewart, of Bonkyl; en surtout, ar. a man's heart gu. ensigned with an imperial crown ppr. on a chief az. three stars of the field, for Douglas. Crest—A salamander vert in flames and spouting fire. Supporters—Standing on a compartment within a circle of timber stakes ppr., dexter, a savage wreathed head and middle with laurel, holding a club all ppr.; sinister, a stag ppr. attired with ten tynes or.
15) (Baron Douglas, 1790, son, according to the decision of the House of Lords in the famous “Douglas Cause,” of the sister of the Duke of Douglas, second wife of Sir John Stewart, of Grandtully). As recorded for the second Marquis of Douglas, with the addition that the Crest is placed on a ducal coronet surmounted by a chapeau.
16) (Earl of Forfar, 1661-1715. The first earl was grandson of the first Marquis of Douglas). Mottoes—Extinctus orior; Jamais arriere. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a man’s heart gu. imperially crowned ppr.; 2nd and 3rd, quarterly, 1st Galloway, 2nd Abernethy, 3rd Brechin, 4th Stewart, of Bonkyl. Crest—A salamander in flames ppr. Supporters—Dexter, a savage wreathed head and middle with laurel, holding in his dexter hand a club erect, and having suspended from his neck by a chain of gold, a man’s heart imperially crowned all ppr.; sinister, a hart ppr. attired or, with a collar az. charged with three stars ar., and suspended therefrom a man’s heart ensigned with an imperial crown all ppr.
17) (Earl of Selkirk, 1688; descended from successive younger sons of Lord William Douglas and Anne, Duchess of Hamilton). Motto—Jamais arrifere. Quarterly, 1st grand quarter, Douglas with the crown; 2nd grand quarter, counterquartered, 1st Galloway, 2nd Abernethy, 3rd Brechin, 4th Stewart, of Bonkyl; 3rd grand quarter, counterquartered, 1st and 4th, gu. three cinquefoils erm., for Hamilton, 2nd and 3rd, ar. a lymphad, sails furled sa. flagged gu., for Arran; 4th grand quarter, gu. a lion ramp. ar. within a bordure of the second, charged with eight roses of the first, for Dunbar. Crest—On a chapeau a salamander in flames ppr. Supporters— Dexter, a savage wreathed head and middle with laurel, and brandishing a club in his dexter hand all ppr.; sinister, an antelope ducally gorged and chained ppr.
18) (Earl of Dumbarton, 1675; first earl a younger son of the first Marquis of Douglas; title extinct at the death of the second earl). Quarterly, 1st, Galloway; 2nd, Abernethy; 3rd, Brechin; 4th, Stewart, of Bonkyl; en surtout, Douglas, all within a bordure, quarterly az. and gu., the first charged with three fleurs-de-lis and the last with three lions pass. guard. or. Crest—A peacock ppr. Supporters—Dexter, a savage wreathed head and middle with laurel, carrying over his shoulder a club ppr.; sinister, a hart ppr. attired or.
19) (Glenbervie, co. Kincardine; Sir William Douglas, second son of the fifth Earl of Angus, in. Elizabeth Auchinleck, heiress of Glenbervie; their son, becoming ninth Earl of Angus, Glenbervie was settled on his younger son, who was made a bart. in 1625; the last bart. d. 1812, and his nephew and heir of line, a Mackenzie, took the designation of Douglas of Glenbervie, and was made a bart. 1831). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Douglas; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a cross counterembattled sa., for Auchinleck.
20) (Bridgeford; from third son of ninth Earl of Angus). Motto—Petit ardua virtus. Quarterly, as the second Marquis of Douglas, within a bordure indented or. Crest—A dexter hand grasping a sword erect ppr.
21) (Whiteriggs; from half-brother of the ninth Earl of Angus). Motto—Fortis et aequus. Quarterly, as the second Marquis of Douglas, within a bordure ar. charged with eight holly leaves vert. Crest—A demi savage holding in his right hand a club erected ppr.
22) (Baron Glenbervie, Ireland; extinct 1823; a cadet of Whiteriggs). Ar. a heart gu. imperially crowned or, on a chief az. three mullets of the field.
23) (Cruixton, co. Forfar; represented by Gen. Sir John Douglas, K.C.B.). Motto—Jamais arrifere. As Whiteriggs, but the bordure engr. Crest—A salamander vert in flames and spouting out fire.
24) (Garrallan, co. Ayr; J. Douglas Boswell, of Garrallan, heir of line). Motto—Fortis et fidelis. Ar. a heart imperially crowned ppr. betw. two buckles az. all within a bordure gu. on a chief of the third three stars of the field. Crest—A heart ppr.
25) (Earl of Morton, as borne by the first three earls, descended from Sir James Douglas, of Dalkeith). Ar. on a chief gu. two stars of the field. Crest—A boar pass. betw. two trees ppr. Supporters—Two savages ppr.
26) (fourth Earl of Morton, Regent of Scotland, of tho Angus branch, and son-in-law of the third earl). Motto—Lock sicker. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, as the last; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a man’s heart gu. on a chief az. three stars of the field. Crest—A boar ppr. in the cleft of an oak tree fructed vert, with a lock az. holding the clefts of the tree together. Supporters—Two savages wreathed head and middle with laurel, each holding a club downwards in his dexter hand.
27) (sixth and later Earls of Morton, of the Lochleven branch). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a man’s heart gu. on a chief az. three stars of the field; 2nd and 3rd, ar. three piles gu. on a chief of the last two stars of the first. Crest, Supporters, and Motto, as the last.
28) (Longniddry, co. Haddington; from a brother of the first Earl of Morton). Ar. a lion’s head erased gu. oa a chief of the last a crescent betw. two stars of the first.
29) (Tilwhilly, co. Kincardine). Motto—Tandem fit surculus arbor. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a man's heart imperially crowned gu. on a chief az. three stars of the field; 2nd, ar. three piles gu. on a chief of the second two stars of the first; 3rd, ar. three mascles sa. on a chief of the second as many lions pass. guard. of the first, for Ogstoun. Crest—A dexter hand issuing from a cloud holding a sword erect ppr. Supporters—Two savages wreathed head and middle with oak, cach with a club in his exterior hand resting on his shoulder ppr. Motto—God for us.
30) (Inchmarlo, co. Kincardine). Quarterly, as the later Earls of Morton, within a bordure counter-compony or and sa. Crest—A dexter hand appearing out of a bush holding an oak leaf ppr.
31) (Morton, co. Dumfries, and Whittingham, 1772). Motto—Sicker. Ar. a cinquefoil sa. on a chief gu. two stars of the field. Crest—A hand grasping a man’s heart ppr.
32) (Francis Brown Douglas, 1860). Ar. a cinquefoil sa. within a bordure wavy erm. on a chief gu. two stars of the field. Crest and Motto, as the last.
33) (Fingland, co. Dumfries, 1852).Motto—Spero. Ar. three piles gu. on a chief of the second two stars of the first, a bordure erm. charged with three cross crosslets fitchee sa. Crest—A man’s heart gu. imperially crowned betw. two wings or.
34) (Earnslaw). Motto—Durate. Ar. three piles gu. on a chief az. as many stars of the first, a bordure vair. Crest—A boat in distress surrounded with clouds and stars shooting through the same all ppr.
35) (Kirkness, co. Kinross). Quarterly, as sixth Earl of Morton, within a bordure az. charged with eight buckles or. Crest and Motto, as Earl of Morton.
36) (Mains, co. Dumbarton). Motto—Quae serrata secura. Ar. a fess chequy gu. aud of the first betw. three stars in chief az. and a man’s heart in base ppr. Crest—An oak tree ppr.
37) (Douglas-Support, co. Lanark; as recorded 1832, for Mrs. Catharine Douglas, wife of General Charles Pye). Motto—Quae; serrata secura. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a man’s heart imperially crowned gu. on a chief az. three stars of the field; 2nd and 3rd, a fess chequy gu. and of the first betw. three stars in chief az. and a man’s heart in base ppr., over all in the middle chief in an escutcheon ar. a woman trampling a snake under her feet and supporting in her arms a child covered with laurel ppr. all within a bordure erm. Crest—An oak tree with a lock hanging from one of the branches ppr.
38) (Douglas-Support; as recorded 1871, for D. Campbell-Douglas). Quarterly, 1st, 2nd, and 4th, as the last, without the escutcheon; 3rd, counter-quartered as Campbell, of Blythewood, q.v. Crest and Motto, as the last.
39) (John Douglas, Albany Herald, 1780). Motto—Sursum. Same Arms as Mains, within a bordure engr. vert, charged with eight crescents or. Crest—A martlet sa.
40) (Bads, co. Linlithgow). Motto—Sapientia et virtus. Ar. a man’s heart pierced by an arrow gu. on a chief az. three stars of the field.
41) (Cliftonhall). Motto—Meliora speranda. Erm. on a chief az. three stars ar. a bordure gu. Crest—A hand holding a heart ppr. ensigned with a crescent or.
42) (Pompherstoun, co. Linlithgow). Erm. on a fess gu. two mullets ar. betw. two fillets compony ar. and az.
43) (Robert Douglas, Bailie of Musselburgh, 1673). Ar. a heart crowned gu. betw. three mullets az.
44) (Col. Robert Douglas, C.B., 1829). Motto—Jamais arriere. Ar. a man's heart ensigned with the crown of Robert Bruce gu., in chief three stars az. all within a bordure embattled of the second. Crest—A man's heart ppr.
45) (Bruntwood, Cheshire). Motto—Forward. Ar. a man's heart gu. imperially crowned ppr. within a bordure az. charged with three mullets of the first, on a chief sa. as many mascles or. Crest—A man’s heart imperially crowned ppr. and winged gu.
46) (Castle Douglas, co. Kircudbright, bart., extinct 1809). Az. on a chev. or, betw. two lions counter ramp. ar. baronially crowned of the second in chief, and in base a lymphad with sails furled, also of the second, three mullets of the field on a canton per pale of the second and third, on the dexter side a human heart ensigned with a regal crown, and on the sinister a thistle leaved and seeded all ppr.
47) (Ireland; Fun. Ent. of Mrs. Douglas, alias Stirling, d. 18 April, 1664). Erm. on a fess az. three mullets ar. a crescent for diff.
48) (Akers Douglas; exemplified to Aretas Akers, Esq., of Chilston Park, Boughton Malherbe, co. Kent, upon his assuming, by royal licence, the surname and designation of Douglas, of Baads, May 24, 1875). Ar. a man’s heart gu. ensigned with an imperial crown ppr. pierced by an arrow fessewise, the pheon towards the dexter also ppr. a chief az. thereon three mullets of the field.
49) (Monteath-Douglas; exemplified in 1851 to Colonel Thomas Monteath, upon his assuming, by royal licence, the additional surname of Douglas). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a man's heart gu. ensigned with an imperial crown or, on a chief az. three mullets of the field, a canton of the third for distinction, for Douglas, of Douglas, 2nd and 3rd, ar. a fess chequy gu. and of the first, in chief three mullets az. and in base a man’s heart gu., for Douglas, of Mains; 2nd and 3rd, or, a bend chequy az. and ar. a bordure gu. a chief embattled of the last, thereon an Eastern crown of the third, the rim inscribed “Ghuznee” in letters sa. betw. on the dexter, pendent by a ribbon per pale vert and of the fourth, a representation of the badge of the third class of the Dooranee Empire, and on the sinister, pendent from a like ribbon, a representation of the gold medal presented to him by the King of Affghanistan for his services at the siege and capture of the fortress of Ghuznee, 23 July, 1839, for Monteath. Crests— 1st, Douglas: On a chapeau turned up erm. a salamander in flames ppr. charged on the shoulder with a cross crosslet or, for distinction, with the Motto over, Jamais arriere; 2nd: An oak tree fructed with a lock hanging from one of the branches all ppr., with the Motto, Quae serata secura; 3rd, Monteath: Out of an Eastern crown or, the rim charged with three bombs fired, an oak tree, the stem transfixed by a sword, pommel and hilt to the dexter all ppr., with the Motto, Viresco.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Heart
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P184
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105